#1107 – 1958 3¢ International Geophysical Year

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.45
$0.45
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.20
$0.20
4 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM636215x30mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM50145x30mm 50 Horizontal Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
- MM420245x30mm 50 Horizontal Clear Bottom-Weld Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
 
U.S. #1107
1958 3¢ International Geophysical Year

Issue Date: May 31, 1958
City:  Chicago, Illinois
Quantity: 125,815,200
Printed by:
Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:  Giori Press
Perforations: 
11
Color:  Black and red orange
 
U.S. #1107’s design was based on a photograph of the Sun, taken during the International Geophysical Year, an international scientific project. During the 18 months of the project, the Sun gave off tremendous bursts of energy – an event that was observed by project members during the study. That was just one of the highlights during project’s time. Others included the launching of Sputnik I, the first man-made satellite sent into orbit around the Earth. The U.S. soon followed with the Explorer I satellite – the country’s first successful launch.
 

Launch Of Explorer I 

Late in the evening of January 31, 1958, the US launched its first satellite, Explorer I.

After World War II, the United States and the Soviet Union struggled to stay one step ahead of each other in space exploration.  Both countries made substantial advancements during this time, but Russia was first to launch an artificial satellite, much to America’s chagrin.

In October of 1957, the Soviets sent Sputnik I into orbit around the Earth.  Then the Soviets sent up a second satellite, Sputnik II, the next month.  This craft carried a dog named Laika, the first animal to be sent into space.

The US quickly responded with Satellite 1958 Alpha, also known as Explorer I.  Designed and built by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Explorer I was part of the US program for the International Geophysical Year 1957-58.  The IGY – an international scientific effort – was planned to coincide with a solar maximum in order to assess the unusual effects of the sun on earth.  The Soviet Union also launched a satellite for the event.

Explorer I was smaller than the Sputniks because American launch vehicles were not as powerful as those used by the Soviet Union.  Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev later commented, “You send up oranges while we send up tons.”

America’s first satellite, Explorer I, was launched from Cape Canaveral (now Kennedy Space Center) in Florida at 10:48 p.m. on January 31, 1958.  The satellite was equipped with a Geiger counter to detect cosmic rays.  Fewer rays were discovered than what scientists had anticipated, leading to the conclusion that strong radiation was coming from a belt of charged particles trapped in space by the Earth’s magnetic field.  That led to the discovery of the Van Allen Belts.

Explorer I stopped transmitting data on May 23, 1958, when its batteries died.  The satellite remained in orbit for more than 12 years, making a fiery reentry over the Pacific Ocean on March 31, 1970.  Its successful mission gave birth to the long-running Explorer program, which launched 78 probes before the new millennium.

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) took control of the satellite program in 1958.  Over the next few years, each nation continued to send up unmanned spacecraft, including meteorological units and lunar probes.  The first communications satellite in flight was America’s Project Score in December 1958.  In February 1959, the first weather satellite, Vanguard II, transmitted pictures of clouds back to earth.

Click here for photos, videos and more about Explorer I and other early US satellites.

 
Read More - Click Here


  • Mini Mix, approximately 500 Stamps Mini Mix, 500 Worldwide Stamps

    Get an instant stamp collection in one simple step.  Order Mystic's mini-mix and you'll get 500-plus U.S. and foreign stamps on and off paper.

    $19.95
    BUY NOW
  • 1887-98  Reg Issues, 12 stamps, used 1887-98 Regular Issue, 12 Used Stamps
    Save time and effort with this collector's set of 12 postally used definitive stamps issued from 1887-1898.  These stamps are now all over 100 years old and represent a ton of neat history.  Order today!
    $30.95
    BUY NOW
  • German Zeppelin Facsimiles, 8v Mint German Zeppelin Facsimiles
    The original set of these overprinted German Graf Zeppelin stamps is very valuable. These high-quality facsimiles offered here were created in Germany and will allow you to affordably fill the spaces for these stamps in your worldwide album and enjoy their classic designs.
    $9.95
    BUY NOW

 

U.S. #1107
1958 3¢ International Geophysical Year

Issue Date: May 31, 1958
City:  Chicago, Illinois
Quantity: 125,815,200
Printed by:
Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:  Giori Press
Perforations: 
11
Color:  Black and red orange
 
U.S. #1107’s design was based on a photograph of the Sun, taken during the International Geophysical Year, an international scientific project. During the 18 months of the project, the Sun gave off tremendous bursts of energy – an event that was observed by project members during the study. That was just one of the highlights during project’s time. Others included the launching of Sputnik I, the first man-made satellite sent into orbit around the Earth. The U.S. soon followed with the Explorer I satellite – the country’s first successful launch.
 

Launch Of Explorer I 

Late in the evening of January 31, 1958, the US launched its first satellite, Explorer I.

After World War II, the United States and the Soviet Union struggled to stay one step ahead of each other in space exploration.  Both countries made substantial advancements during this time, but Russia was first to launch an artificial satellite, much to America’s chagrin.

In October of 1957, the Soviets sent Sputnik I into orbit around the Earth.  Then the Soviets sent up a second satellite, Sputnik II, the next month.  This craft carried a dog named Laika, the first animal to be sent into space.

The US quickly responded with Satellite 1958 Alpha, also known as Explorer I.  Designed and built by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Explorer I was part of the US program for the International Geophysical Year 1957-58.  The IGY – an international scientific effort – was planned to coincide with a solar maximum in order to assess the unusual effects of the sun on earth.  The Soviet Union also launched a satellite for the event.

Explorer I was smaller than the Sputniks because American launch vehicles were not as powerful as those used by the Soviet Union.  Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev later commented, “You send up oranges while we send up tons.”

America’s first satellite, Explorer I, was launched from Cape Canaveral (now Kennedy Space Center) in Florida at 10:48 p.m. on January 31, 1958.  The satellite was equipped with a Geiger counter to detect cosmic rays.  Fewer rays were discovered than what scientists had anticipated, leading to the conclusion that strong radiation was coming from a belt of charged particles trapped in space by the Earth’s magnetic field.  That led to the discovery of the Van Allen Belts.

Explorer I stopped transmitting data on May 23, 1958, when its batteries died.  The satellite remained in orbit for more than 12 years, making a fiery reentry over the Pacific Ocean on March 31, 1970.  Its successful mission gave birth to the long-running Explorer program, which launched 78 probes before the new millennium.

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) took control of the satellite program in 1958.  Over the next few years, each nation continued to send up unmanned spacecraft, including meteorological units and lunar probes.  The first communications satellite in flight was America’s Project Score in December 1958.  In February 1959, the first weather satellite, Vanguard II, transmitted pictures of clouds back to earth.

Click here for photos, videos and more about Explorer I and other early US satellites.