#1108 – 1958 3¢ Gunston Hall

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U.S. #1108
3¢ Gunston Hall
 
Issue Date: June 12, 1958
City: Lorton, VA
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:
Rotary press
Perforations:
11 x 10.5
Quantity: 108,415,200
Color: Light green
 
Located on the shore of the Potomac River, just down-river from Mount Vernon, Gunston Hall was the residence of the early American patriot George Mason. This 550-acre plantation was built between 1755-60. It is said that Mason personally oversaw every aspect of the construction.
 
Two of the most captivating features of this plantation are the grove of boxwood trees (many of which were there in Mason’s time on the plantation), and the intricate woodwork inside the house itself.
 
George Mason (1725-92)
American Patriot
As the author of the Virginia Declaration of Rights, George Mason is credited with providing the framework for the U.S. Bill of Rights. Although he served as the Virginia delegate to the Constitutional Convention, he refused to sign the finished document, because “...there is no Declaration of Rights, and the laws of the general government being paramount to the laws and constitution of the several states, the Declaration of Rights in the separate states are no security.”
 
Following his retirement from politics, Mason continued to give advice from his home. Thomas Jefferson said of Mason, “Whenever I pass your road, I shall do myself the favor of turning into it.” Unfortunately, Mason’s friendship with George Washington did not withstand the volatile issues facing the Continental Congress. Washington referred to Mason as a “quondum (former) friend,” and the neighbors seldom spoke in later years.
 
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U.S. #1108
3¢ Gunston Hall
 
Issue Date: June 12, 1958
City: Lorton, VA
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:
Rotary press
Perforations:
11 x 10.5
Quantity: 108,415,200
Color: Light green
 
Located on the shore of the Potomac River, just down-river from Mount Vernon, Gunston Hall was the residence of the early American patriot George Mason. This 550-acre plantation was built between 1755-60. It is said that Mason personally oversaw every aspect of the construction.
 
Two of the most captivating features of this plantation are the grove of boxwood trees (many of which were there in Mason’s time on the plantation), and the intricate woodwork inside the house itself.
 
George Mason (1725-92)
American Patriot
As the author of the Virginia Declaration of Rights, George Mason is credited with providing the framework for the U.S. Bill of Rights. Although he served as the Virginia delegate to the Constitutional Convention, he refused to sign the finished document, because “...there is no Declaration of Rights, and the laws of the general government being paramount to the laws and constitution of the several states, the Declaration of Rights in the separate states are no security.”
 
Following his retirement from politics, Mason continued to give advice from his home. Thomas Jefferson said of Mason, “Whenever I pass your road, I shall do myself the favor of turning into it.” Unfortunately, Mason’s friendship with George Washington did not withstand the volatile issues facing the Continental Congress. Washington referred to Mason as a “quondum (former) friend,” and the neighbors seldom spoke in later years.