#1116 – 1959 4¢ Statue of Lincoln

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U.S. #1116
1958-59 4¢ Lincoln Statue

Issue Date: May 30, 1959
City:  Washington, D.C.
Quantity: 126,500,000
Printed by:
Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:  Rotary Press
Perforations: 
11 x 10 ½ 
Color:  Dark Blue
 
This final issue in the Lincoln Sesquicentennial Series shows a drawing by Fritz Busse of part of the famous statue by Daniel Chester French, which stands in the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C.
 

Birth Of Daniel Chester French 

Daniel Chester French was born on April 20, 1850, in Exeter, New Hampshire.

French was the son Henry Flagg French, a lawyer, judge, and Assistant U.S. Treasury Secretary. Though he showed a talent for drawing as a child, French didn’t discover sculpture until his late teens.

After the family moved to Concord, Massachusetts, in 1867, French met artist Abigail May Alcott (sister of author Louisa May Alcott and the inspiration for Amy in Little Women). Having studied fine arts in Boston, Alcott gave French an introduction to working with clay and encouraged him to pursue a career. He went on to study with the same teachers she had – William Rimmer (anatomy) and William Morris Hunt (drawing). French then spent a year at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and several years in Florence, Italy, under the instruction of Thomas Ball.

In 1873, family friend, Ralph Waldo Emerson helped French get one of the most important commissions of his career. The city of Concord was preparing for the Centennial of the Revolutionary War Battles of Lexington and Concord and wanted to erect a statue at the North Bridge to commemorate them. Emerson recommended French for the job, and he got it. The people of Concord gave French their family’s militia uniforms so the statue could be as accurate as possible. Several locals also posed to provide models for the head, while the body was based on a famous classical sculpture. Ten Civil War Cannons were melted to provide the bronze for the seven-foot tall statue. It was unveiled on April 19, 1875, with President Ulysses S. Grant, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, and Ralph Waldo Emerson in attendance.

French was just 25 at the time, and had only a few years of education in sculpture. The Minute Man was his first full-sized sculpture and it earned him immediate acclaim. He then established his own studio in Washington, D.C., and began receiving commissions for portrait busts as well as tall figures for public buildings. His renown began to spread and soon, he was hired to sculpt three massive figures for the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition. Among them was the 65-foot tall Statue of the Republic, a personification of the ideal of the Republic covered in gold leaf. The statue towered over the expo, which was attended by some 27 million people. The recognition he received from that statue made him even more famous, and soon French had more commissions than he could handle. In fact, he often had to book them two to three years in advance.

In the coming years, French helped found the National Sculpture Society, became a member of a number of art groups, and received honorary degrees from four universities. He also designed one side of the Pulitzer Prize gold medal (picturing Benjamin Franklin).

In 1914, French was hired for perhaps one of his most famous sculptures, the seated Abraham Lincoln that sits in Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. He made three plaster casts (which are on display at his Chesterwood Studio in Massachusetts) before the final sculpture, which took a year to make, could be completed.

Over the course of his career, French made over 100 statues, memorials, sculpture and reliefs, many of which are on display in public places. He died on October 7, 1931. Several years before he’d claimed, “I’d like to live to be two thousand years old and just sculpt all the time.”

Click here to view some of Fren

 
 
Abraham Lincoln, President
Elected President in November 1860, Abraham Lincoln inherited a nation already on the brink of civil war.  An outspoken critic of slavery, Lincoln had won entirely on the strength of his support in the North.  Shortly after the election, seven Southern states seceded.  One month after Lincoln assumed the office, the first shots of the Civil War were fired.
 
The Civil War consumed much of Lincoln’s presidency.  He closely supervised his military commanders and visited key battlegrounds.  In 1862, Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, which freed slaves in Confederate territories.  This allowed the Union army to liberate slaves as it moved south.  Lincoln then focused on the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment, which permanently abolished slavery throughout the nation.
 
In spite of the Union’s advantages, the Confederate Army was victorious in many critical battles, and the fighting wore on for several years.  In 1864, Lincoln won re-election in a landslide.  In his inaugural speech, with victory nearly at hand, Lincoln promised to act “with malice toward none; with charity for all.”
 
One month later, General Robert E. Lee surrendered the Confederate Army and the Civil War ended.  Complete victory was short lived – President Lincoln was assassinated less than a week later.
 
 
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U.S. #1116
1958-59 4¢ Lincoln Statue

Issue Date: May 30, 1959
City:  Washington, D.C.
Quantity: 126,500,000
Printed by:
Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:  Rotary Press
Perforations: 
11 x 10 ½ 
Color:  Dark Blue
 
This final issue in the Lincoln Sesquicentennial Series shows a drawing by Fritz Busse of part of the famous statue by Daniel Chester French, which stands in the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C.
 

Birth Of Daniel Chester French 

Daniel Chester French was born on April 20, 1850, in Exeter, New Hampshire.

French was the son Henry Flagg French, a lawyer, judge, and Assistant U.S. Treasury Secretary. Though he showed a talent for drawing as a child, French didn’t discover sculpture until his late teens.

After the family moved to Concord, Massachusetts, in 1867, French met artist Abigail May Alcott (sister of author Louisa May Alcott and the inspiration for Amy in Little Women). Having studied fine arts in Boston, Alcott gave French an introduction to working with clay and encouraged him to pursue a career. He went on to study with the same teachers she had – William Rimmer (anatomy) and William Morris Hunt (drawing). French then spent a year at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and several years in Florence, Italy, under the instruction of Thomas Ball.

In 1873, family friend, Ralph Waldo Emerson helped French get one of the most important commissions of his career. The city of Concord was preparing for the Centennial of the Revolutionary War Battles of Lexington and Concord and wanted to erect a statue at the North Bridge to commemorate them. Emerson recommended French for the job, and he got it. The people of Concord gave French their family’s militia uniforms so the statue could be as accurate as possible. Several locals also posed to provide models for the head, while the body was based on a famous classical sculpture. Ten Civil War Cannons were melted to provide the bronze for the seven-foot tall statue. It was unveiled on April 19, 1875, with President Ulysses S. Grant, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, and Ralph Waldo Emerson in attendance.

French was just 25 at the time, and had only a few years of education in sculpture. The Minute Man was his first full-sized sculpture and it earned him immediate acclaim. He then established his own studio in Washington, D.C., and began receiving commissions for portrait busts as well as tall figures for public buildings. His renown began to spread and soon, he was hired to sculpt three massive figures for the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition. Among them was the 65-foot tall Statue of the Republic, a personification of the ideal of the Republic covered in gold leaf. The statue towered over the expo, which was attended by some 27 million people. The recognition he received from that statue made him even more famous, and soon French had more commissions than he could handle. In fact, he often had to book them two to three years in advance.

In the coming years, French helped found the National Sculpture Society, became a member of a number of art groups, and received honorary degrees from four universities. He also designed one side of the Pulitzer Prize gold medal (picturing Benjamin Franklin).

In 1914, French was hired for perhaps one of his most famous sculptures, the seated Abraham Lincoln that sits in Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. He made three plaster casts (which are on display at his Chesterwood Studio in Massachusetts) before the final sculpture, which took a year to make, could be completed.

Over the course of his career, French made over 100 statues, memorials, sculpture and reliefs, many of which are on display in public places. He died on October 7, 1931. Several years before he’d claimed, “I’d like to live to be two thousand years old and just sculpt all the time.”

Click here to view some of Fren

 
 
Abraham Lincoln, President
Elected President in November 1860, Abraham Lincoln inherited a nation already on the brink of civil war.  An outspoken critic of slavery, Lincoln had won entirely on the strength of his support in the North.  Shortly after the election, seven Southern states seceded.  One month after Lincoln assumed the office, the first shots of the Civil War were fired.
 
The Civil War consumed much of Lincoln’s presidency.  He closely supervised his military commanders and visited key battlegrounds.  In 1862, Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, which freed slaves in Confederate territories.  This allowed the Union army to liberate slaves as it moved south.  Lincoln then focused on the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment, which permanently abolished slavery throughout the nation.
 
In spite of the Union’s advantages, the Confederate Army was victorious in many critical battles, and the fighting wore on for several years.  In 1864, Lincoln won re-election in a landslide.  In his inaugural speech, with victory nearly at hand, Lincoln promised to act “with malice toward none; with charity for all.”
 
One month later, General Robert E. Lee surrendered the Confederate Army and the Civil War ended.  Complete victory was short lived – President Lincoln was assassinated less than a week later.