#1201 – 1962 4c National Apprenticeship Act

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U.S. #1201
1962 4¢ Apprenticeship 
 
Issue Date: August 31, 1962
City: Washington, D.C.
Quantity: 120,055,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations:  11 x 10 ½
Color: Black, yellow bister
 
 
U.S. #1201 commemorates the 25th anniversary of the National Apprenticeship Act. Passed in 1937, the Act established standards for apprenticeship programs. It included regulations that protected the health and welfare of its members, and promoted the hiring of apprentices. The stamp shows an older, weathered hand passing a micrometer (measuring tool) to the hand of a younger person, to symbolize the passing of knowledge.
 
The legislation was also called the “Fitzgerald Act,” after Connecticut congressman William J. Fitzgerald, who sponsored the Act. Fitzgerald had worked in a foundry (factory specializing in casting molten metal) as a young man. 
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U.S. #1201
1962 4¢ Apprenticeship 
 
Issue Date: August 31, 1962
City: Washington, D.C.
Quantity: 120,055,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations:  11 x 10 ½
Color: Black, yellow bister
 
 
U.S. #1201 commemorates the 25th anniversary of the National Apprenticeship Act. Passed in 1937, the Act established standards for apprenticeship programs. It included regulations that protected the health and welfare of its members, and promoted the hiring of apprentices. The stamp shows an older, weathered hand passing a micrometer (measuring tool) to the hand of a younger person, to symbolize the passing of knowledge.
 
The legislation was also called the “Fitzgerald Act,” after Connecticut congressman William J. Fitzgerald, who sponsored the Act. Fitzgerald had worked in a foundry (factory specializing in casting molten metal) as a young man.