#1262 – 1965 5c Physical Fitness, Centennial of the Sokols

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.40
$0.40
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.20
$0.20
5 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM50230x45mm 50 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
- MM420330x45mm 50 Vertical Clear Bottom-Weld Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
 
U.S. #1262
5¢ Physical Fitness
 
Issue Date: February 15, 1965
City: Washington, D.C.
Quantity: 115,095,000
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Giori Press
Perforations:
11
Color: Maroon and black
 
U.S. #1262 commemorates the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Sokol program. It pictures the famed discus thrower statue that stands near the State Department in Washington, D.C. 
 

First American Sokol Organization

On February 14, 1865, the first Sokol organization in the United States was established in St. Louis, Missouri. 

The Sokol movement began in the Czech region of Austria-Hungary, Prague.  It was loosely based on the Ancient Greek practice of training athletes and warriors.  It was also directly influenced by the German Turnverein (also called the Turners) that were founded in 1811. 

The first Sokol organization was founded on February 16, 1862, in Prague.  The founders developed a system of calisthenics and gymnastics that would help members develop a sense of individual discipline.  Their name, Sokol, is Czech for falcon, chosen because “The Falcon, is a bird who, by his swiftness and energy, symbolizes the active, vigorous, strenuous, real Spartan life, which is the ideal of Sokol programs.” 

The Sokol motto was “A Sound Mind in a Sound Body.”  The fitness-training center provided lectures, discussions, and group outings that encouraged physical, moral, and intellectual training. They focused heavily on gymnastics, relating their studies back to those of the Ancient Greek athletes.

As more and more Czech people immigrated to the United States, they sought a sense of community and reminisced about the Sokol organizations back home.  On February 14, 1865, a group of Czech immigrants formed the first Sokol organization in America in St.  Louis, Missouri.  Soon more Sokol groups were established and by 1878, the US had 13 Sokol chapters.  At one point, there were 120 separate Sokol groups in the US.

In 1879, all the different chapters joined together to form the National Sokol Union.  And in 1897, another group formed, the Fügner-Tyrs Sokol District.  In 1917, these two major groups merged to become the American Sokol Organization.  At its height, the American Sokol Organization had some 20,000 members ranging from Texas to Canada.

Read More - Click Here


  • 1998-2019 U.S. Semi-Postal Stamps, plus FREE 2014 Imperforate Semi-Postal, 8 stamps 1998-2019 U.S. Semi-Postal Stamps

    Semi-postal stamps are issued to serve a double purpose.  Priced higher than regular postage, they pay the current mailing rate plus an added amount contributed to a charitable cause.  As of 2019, eight semi-postal (sometimes called "fundraising") stamps had been issued.  Now you can get them in one easy order and receive the B5a imperforate semi-postal FREE!

    $13.50
    BUY NOW
  • 1990s First Day Covers, Collection of 100 100 First Day Covers Issued During the 1990s
    Some of the stamps I saw in my set of 100 covers highlighted Looney Tunes characters, statehood anniversaries, Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm, Elvis Presley, Dorothy Parker, and more.  Order your set today.
    $49.95
    BUY NOW
  • 1922-32 Regular Issues, 24 stamps, used 1922-32 Regular Issues, 24 used stamps

    This set of 24 postally used 1922-32 regular issues stamps is a great addition to your collection. Order today to receive: 571, 610, 632, 634, 635, 636, 637, 638, 639, 640, 641, 642, 653,684, 685, 692, 693, 694, 697, 698, 699, 700, 701, and 720.

    $6.25
    BUY NOW

 

U.S. #1262
5¢ Physical Fitness
 
Issue Date: February 15, 1965
City: Washington, D.C.
Quantity: 115,095,000
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Giori Press
Perforations:
11
Color: Maroon and black
 
U.S. #1262 commemorates the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Sokol program. It pictures the famed discus thrower statue that stands near the State Department in Washington, D.C. 
 

First American Sokol Organization

On February 14, 1865, the first Sokol organization in the United States was established in St. Louis, Missouri. 

The Sokol movement began in the Czech region of Austria-Hungary, Prague.  It was loosely based on the Ancient Greek practice of training athletes and warriors.  It was also directly influenced by the German Turnverein (also called the Turners) that were founded in 1811. 

The first Sokol organization was founded on February 16, 1862, in Prague.  The founders developed a system of calisthenics and gymnastics that would help members develop a sense of individual discipline.  Their name, Sokol, is Czech for falcon, chosen because “The Falcon, is a bird who, by his swiftness and energy, symbolizes the active, vigorous, strenuous, real Spartan life, which is the ideal of Sokol programs.” 

The Sokol motto was “A Sound Mind in a Sound Body.”  The fitness-training center provided lectures, discussions, and group outings that encouraged physical, moral, and intellectual training. They focused heavily on gymnastics, relating their studies back to those of the Ancient Greek athletes.

As more and more Czech people immigrated to the United States, they sought a sense of community and reminisced about the Sokol organizations back home.  On February 14, 1865, a group of Czech immigrants formed the first Sokol organization in America in St.  Louis, Missouri.  Soon more Sokol groups were established and by 1878, the US had 13 Sokol chapters.  At one point, there were 120 separate Sokol groups in the US.

In 1879, all the different chapters joined together to form the National Sokol Union.  And in 1897, another group formed, the Fügner-Tyrs Sokol District.  In 1917, these two major groups merged to become the American Sokol Organization.  At its height, the American Sokol Organization had some 20,000 members ranging from Texas to Canada.