#1274 – 1965 11c International Telecommunication Union

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.80FREE with 200 points!
$0.80
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.75
$0.75
6 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM636215x30mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM50145x30mm 50 Horizontal Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
- MM420245x30mm 50 Horizontal Clear Bottom-Weld Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
 
U.S. #1274
5¢ International Telecommunications Union
 
Issue Date: October 6, 1965
City: Washington, DC
Quantity:
26,995,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:
Giori press
Perforations
: 11
Color: Black, carmine and bister
 
On the occasion of its 100th anniversary, the International Telecommunications Union is honored by this issue. This organization now governs international radio, telephone, and telegraphic communications.
 

The International Telecommunication Union

On May 17, 1865, the International Telegraph Union (ITU), which later became the International Telecommunication Union, was founded. 

As the telegraph industry grew in the mid-1800s, the need for standardization and international cooperation became apparent.  Between 1849 and 1865, several agreements were made between Western European nations to create a set of international communication standards. 

 

Then in 1865, many of these nations agreed that they should all meet and set international standards for telegraphy equipment and instructions, as well as tariffs and accounting rules. 

From March 1 to May 17, 1865, delegations from 20 European states visited Paris as part of the first International Telegraph Conference.  These meetings led to the signing of the International Telegraph Convention on May 17.  This marked the establishment of the International Telegraph Union, which was the first international standards organization.  The union’s role was to establish basic principles for international telegraphy, including the use of Morse code as the standard telegraph alphabet, the secrecy of messages, and the right of anyone to use telegraphy.

Decades later, the International Radiotelegraph Union was established in 1906 at the first International Radiotelegraph Convention in Berlin.  A group of 29 nations met in that instance to establish radio regulations.  The International Telegraph Union helped to administer that conference.

In 1932, the International Telegraph Union and the International Radiotelegraph Union merged to become the International Telecommunication Union.  This new combined organization would oversee telegraphy, telephony, and radio.

Then in 1947, the ITU was recognized as a specialized global agency for telecommunications by the United Nations.  Two years later, the ITU officially became an agency of the United Nations. 

Now the world’s oldest international organization, the ITU oversees global use of radio spectrum, encourages cooperation in satellite orbits, strives to improve telecommunications in developing countries, and coordinates worldwide technical standards.  The ITU also works with broadband internet, wireless technology, aeronautical and maritime navigation, radio astronomy, satellite meteorology, mobile phones, TV broadcasting, and next-generation networks. 

Click here for more worldwide stamps and covers honoring the ITU.

Click here for more from the ITU’s website.

 
Read More - Click Here


  • 2020 First-Class Forever Stamps - Winter Scenes 2020 First-Class Forever Stamps - Winter Scenes

    In 2020, the United States Postal Service issued a set of 10 new Forever stamps picturing winter scenes.  Add these popular stamps to your collection now!

    $8.50- $64.95
    BUY NOW
  • 1980s First Day Covers, Collection of 100 100 First Day Covers Issued During the 1980s
    Some of the stamps I saw in my set of 100 covers honored the 1980 Winter Olympics, paid tribute to the service of American veterans,  and recalled some of the United States’ most well-known first ladies (like Abigail Adams and Eleanor Roosevelt).  There was even a cover issued for the World Stamp Expo of 1989.  Order your set today.
    $49.95
    BUY NOW
  • U.S. Used Stamp Collection - 157 stamps U.S. Used Collection of 157 stamps

    You'll receive postally used stamps issued from 1890 to 2010 – that's 120 years of history to explore!  This collection includes definitive, commemorative, and Airmail stamps, plus a few other surprises.  You'll have a great time exploring the stamps and adding them to your collection.  Order today.

    $4.95
    BUY NOW

 

U.S. #1274
5¢ International Telecommunications Union
 
Issue Date: October 6, 1965
City: Washington, DC
Quantity:
26,995,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:
Giori press
Perforations
: 11
Color: Black, carmine and bister
 
On the occasion of its 100th anniversary, the International Telecommunications Union is honored by this issue. This organization now governs international radio, telephone, and telegraphic communications.
 

The International Telecommunication Union

On May 17, 1865, the International Telegraph Union (ITU), which later became the International Telecommunication Union, was founded. 

As the telegraph industry grew in the mid-1800s, the need for standardization and international cooperation became apparent.  Between 1849 and 1865, several agreements were made between Western European nations to create a set of international communication standards. 

 

Then in 1865, many of these nations agreed that they should all meet and set international standards for telegraphy equipment and instructions, as well as tariffs and accounting rules. 

From March 1 to May 17, 1865, delegations from 20 European states visited Paris as part of the first International Telegraph Conference.  These meetings led to the signing of the International Telegraph Convention on May 17.  This marked the establishment of the International Telegraph Union, which was the first international standards organization.  The union’s role was to establish basic principles for international telegraphy, including the use of Morse code as the standard telegraph alphabet, the secrecy of messages, and the right of anyone to use telegraphy.

Decades later, the International Radiotelegraph Union was established in 1906 at the first International Radiotelegraph Convention in Berlin.  A group of 29 nations met in that instance to establish radio regulations.  The International Telegraph Union helped to administer that conference.

In 1932, the International Telegraph Union and the International Radiotelegraph Union merged to become the International Telecommunication Union.  This new combined organization would oversee telegraphy, telephony, and radio.

Then in 1947, the ITU was recognized as a specialized global agency for telecommunications by the United Nations.  Two years later, the ITU officially became an agency of the United Nations. 

Now the world’s oldest international organization, the ITU oversees global use of radio spectrum, encourages cooperation in satellite orbits, strives to improve telecommunications in developing countries, and coordinates worldwide technical standards.  The ITU also works with broadband internet, wireless technology, aeronautical and maritime navigation, radio astronomy, satellite meteorology, mobile phones, TV broadcasting, and next-generation networks. 

Click here for more worldwide stamps and covers honoring the ITU.

Click here for more from the ITU’s website.