#1337 – 1967 5c Mississippi Statehood

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Issue Date:  December 11, 1967

City:  Natchez, MS

Quantity:  113,330,000

Printed By:  Bureau of Engraving and Printing

Printing Method:  Giori Press

Perforations:  11

Color:  Bright greenish blue, green and red brown

 

This stamp, which was issued to commemorate the state's centennial, pictures Mississippi's state flower, the magnolia.

 

Mississippi’s Road to Statehood

The Mississippi Territory was organized by Congress in 1798.  Development of the Territory began to flourish in 1804, when the United States gained control of the Mississippi River.  Economic development was also aided by Eli Whitney’s invention of the cotton gin in 1793 and the introduction of the improved Petit Gulf cottonseed in 1806.  These two advances made Mississippi one of the wealthiest territories of the period.  By 1812, the Mississippi Territory had been expanded to include all of present-day Alabama, Mississippi, and parts of Florida.

 

In early 1817, Mississippi was divided into the state of Mississippi and the Alabama Territory.  Mississippi was admitted as the 20th state of the Union later that same year, on December 10.  David Holmes was elected the first state governor.  Jackson, Mississippi, became the permanent capital city in 1822.

 

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Issue Date:  December 11, 1967

City:  Natchez, MS

Quantity:  113,330,000

Printed By:  Bureau of Engraving and Printing

Printing Method:  Giori Press

Perforations:  11

Color:  Bright greenish blue, green and red brown

 

This stamp, which was issued to commemorate the state's centennial, pictures Mississippi's state flower, the magnolia.

 

Mississippi’s Road to Statehood

The Mississippi Territory was organized by Congress in 1798.  Development of the Territory began to flourish in 1804, when the United States gained control of the Mississippi River.  Economic development was also aided by Eli Whitney’s invention of the cotton gin in 1793 and the introduction of the improved Petit Gulf cottonseed in 1806.  These two advances made Mississippi one of the wealthiest territories of the period.  By 1812, the Mississippi Territory had been expanded to include all of present-day Alabama, Mississippi, and parts of Florida.

 

In early 1817, Mississippi was divided into the state of Mississippi and the Alabama Territory.  Mississippi was admitted as the 20th state of the Union later that same year, on December 10.  David Holmes was elected the first state governor.  Jackson, Mississippi, became the permanent capital city in 1822.