#17 – 1851 12c Washington imperforate, black

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Usually ships within 30 days.i$3,000.00
$3,000.00
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$390.00
$390.00
- Unused Stamp(s) (small flaws)
Usually ships within 60 days.i$1,900.00
$1,900.00
- Used Stamp(s) (small flaws)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$225.00
$225.00
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Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM637215x32mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM76830x32mm 25 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.25
$3.25

U.S. #17
Series of 1851-57 12¢ Washington
 
First Day of Issue: July 1, 1851
Quantity issued: 2,500,000 (estimate)
Printed by: Toppan, Carpenter & Co.
Printing Method: Flat plate
Watermark: None
Perforation: Imperforate
Color: Black

In 1851, Congress reduced postal rates. These new rates practically eliminated distance as a factor and created a need for new denominations. The 1¢ stamp was used on all mail up to 3 ounces and on “drop letters” which were mailed to the same town. The single letter rate, based on a half ounce, was changed to 3¢ for mail not over a distance of 3,000 miles. Mail exceeding this distance was lowered to 6¢. In 1855, the rate for letters over 3,000 miles changed to 10¢. Therefore, the 12¢ Washington stamp satisfied the double domestic rate over 3,000 miles.
 
Bisects of U.S. #17 are known and are greatly valued on cover (which helps to document their genuine postal use and eliminate the potential for fraud).
 
Prepayment was still optional. If postage was paid by the addressee upon receipt, the rate was higher. Due to increased collect rates, the use of postage stamps was greatly stimulated. In 1855, pre-payment was made compulsory.
 
Every U.S. #17 stamp was printed from the same plate onto hard, white wove paper. The plate was recut a great deal, but the work was done skillfully. A number of double transfers are known.
     
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U.S. #17
Series of 1851-57 12¢ Washington
 
First Day of Issue: July 1, 1851
Quantity issued: 2,500,000 (estimate)
Printed by: Toppan, Carpenter & Co.
Printing Method: Flat plate
Watermark: None
Perforation: Imperforate
Color: Black

In 1851, Congress reduced postal rates. These new rates practically eliminated distance as a factor and created a need for new denominations. The 1¢ stamp was used on all mail up to 3 ounces and on “drop letters” which were mailed to the same town. The single letter rate, based on a half ounce, was changed to 3¢ for mail not over a distance of 3,000 miles. Mail exceeding this distance was lowered to 6¢. In 1855, the rate for letters over 3,000 miles changed to 10¢. Therefore, the 12¢ Washington stamp satisfied the double domestic rate over 3,000 miles.
 
Bisects of U.S. #17 are known and are greatly valued on cover (which helps to document their genuine postal use and eliminate the potential for fraud).
 
Prepayment was still optional. If postage was paid by the addressee upon receipt, the rate was higher. Due to increased collect rates, the use of postage stamps was greatly stimulated. In 1855, pre-payment was made compulsory.
 
Every U.S. #17 stamp was printed from the same plate onto hard, white wove paper. The plate was recut a great deal, but the work was done skillfully. A number of double transfers are known.