#1821 – 1980 15c Frances Perkins

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.70FREE with 120 points!
$0.70
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.20
$0.20
7 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM50230x45mm 50 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
- MM420330x45mm 50 Vertical Clear Bottom-Weld Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
 
U.S. #1821
1980 15¢ Frances Perkins
   
Issue Date: April 10, 1980
City: Washington, D.C.
Quantity: 163,510,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Engraved
Perforations: 10 ½ x 11
Color: Prussian blue
 
U.S. #1821 commemorates Frances Perkins, appointed by Franklin D. Roosevelt as head of the Department of Labor from 1933 to 1945.  In doing so, Perkins became the first woman to serve on a Presidential cabinet.
 
 

First Female Cabinet Member 

On February 28, 1933, President Franklin D. Roosevelt appointed Frances Perkins as head of the Department of Labor, making her the first woman to serve on a presidential cabinet.

Born on April 10, 1880, in Boston, Massachusetts, Perkins attended Mount Holyoke College, where she earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in chemistry and physics in 1902. She went on to earn a master’s in political science from Columbia in 1910.

That same year, Perkins became well known throughout New York when she served as head of that state’s Consumers League.  In that role, she fought for improved working conditions and reasonable hours.  After witnessing a tragic factory fire, Perkins decided to leave her office and become executive secretary for the Committee on Safety in the City of New York.  In the coming years, she would hold several other positions within the New York government.  This included an appointment to the state’s Industrial Commission by Governor Alfred Smith.  And in 1929, then-governor Franklin Roosevelt made her the first Industrial Commissioner of the New York State Department of Labor.

As head of the New York Department of Labor, several different political factions in the state respected Perkins. She helped make major reforms such as increased factory investigations, shortened the workweek for women, and fought for minimum wage and unemployment insurance laws.  She also worked to end child labor and improve safety for female workers.

Having seen how effectively Perkins had performed in New York, newly elected President Franklin Roosevelt wanted to bring her to Washington, DC, in a similar capacity. On February 28, 1933, he appointed her secretary of the US Department of Labor.  She was the first woman to ever be appointed to a cabinet position in the US (this also made her the first woman to enter the presidential line of succession).  She was officially sworn in on March 4, 1933, the same day Roosevelt was sworn in as president.

As head of the Labor Department, Perkins worked closely with Roosevelt in the drafting of his New Deal legislation, particularly minimum wage laws.  In 1934, she served as chair of the president’s Committee on Economic Security (CES).  In that role, she helped to create the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) and She-She-She Camps, a female version of the CCC.  And in 1935, Perkins worked on the Social Security Act.

Perkins served as head of the Labor Department for 12 years, more than anyone else in history.  In 1945, President Harry Truman asked her to serve on the US Civil Service Commission, which she did until 1952.  Perkins retired from government work after that but continued to work as a teacher in New York.  She died on May 14, 1965. The US Department of Labor headquarters was named in her honor in 1980.

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
Read More - Click Here


  • 2020 First-Class Forever Stamp - Holiday Delights 2020 First-Class Forever Stamps - Holiday Delights

    In 2020, the United States Postal Service issued a set of 4 new Forever stamps picturing Holiday Delights.  Add these popular stamps to your collection now!

    $4.50- $21.50
    BUY NOW
  • 2019 Giant US Commemorative Collection, 212 mint stamps 2019 Giant US Commemorative Collection of 212 Mint Stamps
    Save time and money with this year-set.  You'll receive every US commemorative stamp with a major Scott number issued in 2019 in one order.  Plus, get the seven mint sheets pictured in our 2019 Heirloom Supplement.  It's the easy way to keep your collection up to date. 
    $219.95
    BUY NOW
  • US Definitive Collection - 650 Used Stamps US Definitive Collection - 650 Used Stamps
    Act now to get an instant collection of 650 used U.S. definitive stamps in one easy order! Definitive stamps are the backbone of the U.S. postal system and essential additions to your collection. Take advantage of this money-saving offer and make your collection grow fast.
    $32.95
    BUY NOW

 

U.S. #1821
1980 15¢ Frances Perkins

 

 

Issue Date: April 10, 1980
City: Washington, D.C.
Quantity: 163,510,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Engraved
Perforations: 10 ½ x 11
Color: Prussian blue

 

U.S. #1821 commemorates Frances Perkins, appointed by Franklin D. Roosevelt as head of the Department of Labor from 1933 to 1945.  In doing so, Perkins became the first woman to serve on a Presidential cabinet.
 
 

First Female Cabinet Member 

On February 28, 1933, President Franklin D. Roosevelt appointed Frances Perkins as head of the Department of Labor, making her the first woman to serve on a presidential cabinet.

Born on April 10, 1880, in Boston, Massachusetts, Perkins attended Mount Holyoke College, where she earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in chemistry and physics in 1902. She went on to earn a master’s in political science from Columbia in 1910.

That same year, Perkins became well known throughout New York when she served as head of that state’s Consumers League.  In that role, she fought for improved working conditions and reasonable hours.  After witnessing a tragic factory fire, Perkins decided to leave her office and become executive secretary for the Committee on Safety in the City of New York.  In the coming years, she would hold several other positions within the New York government.  This included an appointment to the state’s Industrial Commission by Governor Alfred Smith.  And in 1929, then-governor Franklin Roosevelt made her the first Industrial Commissioner of the New York State Department of Labor.

As head of the New York Department of Labor, several different political factions in the state respected Perkins. She helped make major reforms such as increased factory investigations, shortened the workweek for women, and fought for minimum wage and unemployment insurance laws.  She also worked to end child labor and improve safety for female workers.

Having seen how effectively Perkins had performed in New York, newly elected President Franklin Roosevelt wanted to bring her to Washington, DC, in a similar capacity. On February 28, 1933, he appointed her secretary of the US Department of Labor.  She was the first woman to ever be appointed to a cabinet position in the US (this also made her the first woman to enter the presidential line of succession).  She was officially sworn in on March 4, 1933, the same day Roosevelt was sworn in as president.

As head of the Labor Department, Perkins worked closely with Roosevelt in the drafting of his New Deal legislation, particularly minimum wage laws.  In 1934, she served as chair of the president’s Committee on Economic Security (CES).  In that role, she helped to create the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) and She-She-She Camps, a female version of the CCC.  And in 1935, Perkins worked on the Social Security Act.

Perkins served as head of the Labor Department for 12 years, more than anyone else in history.  In 1945, President Harry Truman asked her to serve on the US Civil Service Commission, which she did until 1952.  Perkins retired from government work after that but continued to work as a teacher in New York.  She died on May 14, 1965. The US Department of Labor headquarters was named in her honor in 1980.