#2031 – 1983 20c Science and Industry

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$1.00
$1.00
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.20
$0.20
7 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM50230x45mm 50 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
- MM420330x45mm 50 Vertical Clear Bottom-Weld Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
 
U.S. #2031
20¢ Science and Industry
 
Issue Date: January 19, 1983
City: Chicago, IL
Quantity: 118,555,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:
Lithographed and engraved
Perforations
: 11
Color: Multicolored
 
This stamp was issued on the 50th anniversary of Chicago's Museum of Science and Industry. The abstract depictions on this issue explore the theme of science and industry.
 

American Association for the Advancement of Science

1983 20¢ Science and Industry stamp
US #2031 was issued on the 50th anniversary of Chicago’s Museum of Science and Industry.

The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) was founded on September 20, 1848, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  It grew to become the world’s largest general scientific society with more than 120,000 members.

Prior to the founding of the AAAS, there had been other scientific organizations that were spread out across the country and were dedicated to specific scientific disciplines.  On September 20, 1848, a group of scientists from the Association of American Geologists and Naturalists met at the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  They reorganized their group as the AAAS, with the goal of promoting and representing science and engineering at the national level.

1963 5¢ Science stamp
US #1237 was issued for the 100th anniversary of the National Academy of Science.

The founding members selected meteorologist William Charles Redfield as their first president, because he had presented the best plan for the new organization.  They wrote their constitution at that first meeting, with the stated goal of encouraging scientific discussions that could lead to increased collaboration.  By working together at the national level, they hoped to make scientific progress quicker and more efficient.

2011 American Scientists: Asa Gray stamp
US #4542 – Asa Gray served as AAAS president in 1871.

One of the first projects the AAAS took on was requesting nautical observations from other countries.  At the time, many American navigators sent their logs to the US Naval Observatory, and some suggested that collecting similar information from other nations would benefit everyone.

1988 45¢ Samuel P. Langley Airmail
US #C118 – Samuel Langley was president in 1887.

The AAAS admitted its first female members in 1850.  By 1860, it had over 2,000 members.  The outbreak of the Civil War postponed meetings until 1866.  The organization continued to grow after that, admitting anyone to join, though a select few earned the title of “Fellow of the AAAS.”

1969 6¢ John Wesley Powell stamp
US #1374 – John Wesley Powell was AAAS president in 1888.

The journal Science was first founded in 1880 with financial support from Thomas Edison and Alexander Graham Bell.  The journal struggled for many years, but in 1900, it became the official journal of the AAAS, benefitting both the journal and the organization.  In 1907, the AAAS got its first permanent home at the Smithsonian Castle on the National Mall in Washington, DC.  In the years to come, the AAAS created the Committee of One Hundred on Scientific Research, established Pacific and Southwestern Divisions, and created an annual “Thousand Dollar Prize” for young scientists that presented their research at AAAS meetings.

1982 37¢ Great Americans: Robert Millikan stamp
US #1866 – Robert Millikan was AAAS president in 1929.

As other scientific organizations formed, the AAAS sometimes struggled, but it also invited them to become affiliates.  Scientists such as Thomas Hunt Morgan, Albert Einstein, Barbara McClintock, and Edwin Hubble published in Science and spoke at meetings, helping to keep the AAAS at the forefront of the field.  The AAAS also introduced programs to help improve public knowledge of scientific advancements.

1998 32¢ Celebrate the Century - 1920s: Margaret Mead
US #3184g – Mead was AAAS president in 1975.

During World War II it created the “AAAS Bulletin” to keep its members informed when they couldn’t meet.  In the 1950s and 60s, the AAAS developed its Science Teaching Improvement Program and formed the Commission on Science Education.  They introduced the Scientific Freedom and Responsibility Award in 1981 to honor scientists who risked their lives or careers for ethical standards.  The AAAS also influenced the passage of the Engineering Equal Opportunities Act, which ensured men and women from all backgrounds received the same opportunities.

Today the AAAS is the world’s largest multidisciplinary scientific society with over 120,000 members in 91 countries.  They continue to promote scientific policies, international cooperation, STEM education, public involvement, and more.  According to the AAS, “Most of all, we support science, technology, engineering and mathematics as solutions to many of the challenges the world faces today.”

 
 
Read More - Click Here


  • Latvia Map Stamps - Imperforate block of 16 with map on reverse, one imperforate single plus FREE album page and mounts Latvia Map Stamps

    Own rare World War I stamp artifacts most collectors have never even seen.  The first stamps of Latvia – printed on German military maps over 100 years ago. Order yours today!

    $36.95
    BUY NOW
  • Legends of Baseball, Artcraft First Day Portraits, Set of 5 Legends of Baseball First Day Cover Set
    This set includes five special-edition First Day Covers featuring the 2000 Legends of Baseball US stamps. Each cover was canceled on the stamps' first day of issue and includes a large vintage photograph of the baseball player pictured on the stamp. Order yours today!
    $29.95
    BUY NOW
  • Legends of Hollywood Full Pane Cover Mix - selections may vary Legends of Hollywood Full Pan Cover Mix
    These panes are really neat – they feature additional images of each star plus a brief biography.  These full pane covers were produced in small numbers. Selections vary – let us choose five covers to add to your collection today.
    $49.95
    BUY NOW

 

U.S. #2031
20¢ Science and Industry
 
Issue Date: January 19, 1983
City: Chicago, IL
Quantity: 118,555,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:
Lithographed and engraved
Perforations
: 11
Color: Multicolored
 
This stamp was issued on the 50th anniversary of Chicago's Museum of Science and Industry. The abstract depictions on this issue explore the theme of science and industry.
 

American Association for the Advancement of Science

1983 20¢ Science and Industry stamp
US #2031 was issued on the 50th anniversary of Chicago’s Museum of Science and Industry.

The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) was founded on September 20, 1848, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  It grew to become the world’s largest general scientific society with more than 120,000 members.

Prior to the founding of the AAAS, there had been other scientific organizations that were spread out across the country and were dedicated to specific scientific disciplines.  On September 20, 1848, a group of scientists from the Association of American Geologists and Naturalists met at the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  They reorganized their group as the AAAS, with the goal of promoting and representing science and engineering at the national level.

1963 5¢ Science stamp
US #1237 was issued for the 100th anniversary of the National Academy of Science.

The founding members selected meteorologist William Charles Redfield as their first president, because he had presented the best plan for the new organization.  They wrote their constitution at that first meeting, with the stated goal of encouraging scientific discussions that could lead to increased collaboration.  By working together at the national level, they hoped to make scientific progress quicker and more efficient.

2011 American Scientists: Asa Gray stamp
US #4542 – Asa Gray served as AAAS president in 1871.

One of the first projects the AAAS took on was requesting nautical observations from other countries.  At the time, many American navigators sent their logs to the US Naval Observatory, and some suggested that collecting similar information from other nations would benefit everyone.

1988 45¢ Samuel P. Langley Airmail
US #C118 – Samuel Langley was president in 1887.

The AAAS admitted its first female members in 1850.  By 1860, it had over 2,000 members.  The outbreak of the Civil War postponed meetings until 1866.  The organization continued to grow after that, admitting anyone to join, though a select few earned the title of “Fellow of the AAAS.”

1969 6¢ John Wesley Powell stamp
US #1374 – John Wesley Powell was AAAS president in 1888.

The journal Science was first founded in 1880 with financial support from Thomas Edison and Alexander Graham Bell.  The journal struggled for many years, but in 1900, it became the official journal of the AAAS, benefitting both the journal and the organization.  In 1907, the AAAS got its first permanent home at the Smithsonian Castle on the National Mall in Washington, DC.  In the years to come, the AAAS created the Committee of One Hundred on Scientific Research, established Pacific and Southwestern Divisions, and created an annual “Thousand Dollar Prize” for young scientists that presented their research at AAAS meetings.

1982 37¢ Great Americans: Robert Millikan stamp
US #1866 – Robert Millikan was AAAS president in 1929.

As other scientific organizations formed, the AAAS sometimes struggled, but it also invited them to become affiliates.  Scientists such as Thomas Hunt Morgan, Albert Einstein, Barbara McClintock, and Edwin Hubble published in Science and spoke at meetings, helping to keep the AAAS at the forefront of the field.  The AAAS also introduced programs to help improve public knowledge of scientific advancements.

1998 32¢ Celebrate the Century - 1920s: Margaret Mead
US #3184g – Mead was AAAS president in 1975.

During World War II it created the “AAAS Bulletin” to keep its members informed when they couldn’t meet.  In the 1950s and 60s, the AAAS developed its Science Teaching Improvement Program and formed the Commission on Science Education.  They introduced the Scientific Freedom and Responsibility Award in 1981 to honor scientists who risked their lives or careers for ethical standards.  The AAAS also influenced the passage of the Engineering Equal Opportunities Act, which ensured men and women from all backgrounds received the same opportunities.

Today the AAAS is the world’s largest multidisciplinary scientific society with over 120,000 members in 91 countries.  They continue to promote scientific policies, international cooperation, STEM education, public involvement, and more.  According to the AAS, “Most of all, we support science, technology, engineering and mathematics as solutions to many of the challenges the world faces today.”