#2491 – 1993 29c Pine Cone,self-adh,single

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U.S. #2491
29¢ Pinecone

Issue Date: November 5, 1993
City: Kansas City, MO
Quantity: 150,000,000
Printed By: Banknote Corporation of America
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations:
Die cut
Color: Multicolored
 
Although pine trees can be found in a wide range of environments throughout the world, these tall, stately trees are especially common in the mountains of western and southeastern North America, southern Europe, and southeastern Asia. There are over 100 species of pines. Some grow as tall as 200 feet, while others remain small and shrublike.
 
Pine trees belong to a group of plants called conifers, which reproduce by means of cones that produce pollen and seeds. There are actually male and female cones, but when people think of “pine cones” they are usually referring to the females that have woody scales and are much larger than males. Fertilized in the spring by the pollen of male cones, the egg cells of females develop into seeds, which usually take several years to mature. In some species the cones open at maturity, while others remain closed until they are opened by food-seeking animals.
 
Pines are the world’s most important source of timber. Because they grow rapidly and form straight, tall trunks, they are ideal for lumber. Some pine trees produce resin, a substance used to make paint, turpentine, and soap. In addition, the wood pulp of many species is used in manufacturing paper.
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U.S. #2491
29¢ Pinecone

Issue Date: November 5, 1993
City: Kansas City, MO
Quantity: 150,000,000
Printed By: Banknote Corporation of America
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations:
Die cut
Color: Multicolored
 
Although pine trees can be found in a wide range of environments throughout the world, these tall, stately trees are especially common in the mountains of western and southeastern North America, southern Europe, and southeastern Asia. There are over 100 species of pines. Some grow as tall as 200 feet, while others remain small and shrublike.
 
Pine trees belong to a group of plants called conifers, which reproduce by means of cones that produce pollen and seeds. There are actually male and female cones, but when people think of “pine cones” they are usually referring to the females that have woody scales and are much larger than males. Fertilized in the spring by the pollen of male cones, the egg cells of females develop into seeds, which usually take several years to mature. In some species the cones open at maturity, while others remain closed until they are opened by food-seeking animals.
 
Pines are the world’s most important source of timber. Because they grow rapidly and form straight, tall trunks, they are ideal for lumber. Some pine trees produce resin, a substance used to make paint, turpentine, and soap. In addition, the wood pulp of many species is used in manufacturing paper.