#2532 – 1991 50c Switzerland

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U.S. #2532
1991 50¢ Switzerland
   
Issue Date: February 22, 1991
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 103,648,000
Printed By: American Bank Note Co
Printing Method: Photogravure
Perforations: 11
Color: Multicolored
 
Switzerland is the oldest operating republic in the world. This commemorative stamp honors its 700th anniversary. 
 
U.S. #2532 is the first U.S. non-airmail commemorative to carry a 50¢ rate since the Trans-Mississippi Series of 1898.
 

Birth of Frances E. Willis

2006 Frances E. Willis stamp
US #4076b – from the 2006 American Diplomats issue

American diplomat Frances E. Willis was born on May 20, 1899, in Metropolis, Illinois.  She was a pioneer in her field – the first woman to become a career foreign service officer, the first US ambassador to Switzerland, and the first female career ambassador, among other notable firsts.

Willis attended Stanford University, earning a degree in history in 1920.  In 1923, she became the first person to receive a Ph.D. in political science at Stanford.  Willis went on to teach history at Goucher College for a year before transferring to Vassar College where she was an assistant professor of political science from 1924 to 1927.

Frances Willis Mystic First Day Cover
US #4076b – Mystic First Day Cover

In 1927, Willis, realized she “didn’t want to just teach political science, [she] wanted to be a part of it.”  Therefore, she left her teaching position and became the third woman in US history to enter the Foreign Service.  As she later recalled, “the more I taught, the more I realized how little I actually knew about Government.  I decided to find out firsthand what it was like.”

Frances Willis Fleetwood First Day Cover
US #4076b – Fleetwood First Day Cover

Willis’s first post was as a consular officer in Valparaiso, Chile.  Over the next few years, she served in Santiago, Stockholm, Brussels, and Luxembourg.  Willis was serving in Brussels when the Nazis invaded Belgium.  At the time, Ambassador Clare Booth Luce and her husband were visiting the ambassador in Brussels.  Willis proceeded to drive them through the German lines to Paris so they could evacuate back to the US.

Frances Willis Classic First Day Cover
US #4076b – Classic First Day Cover

Willis spent most of World War II as first secretary and consul of the US embassy in Madrid.  She was then sent to the US State Department to serve as an assistant to the secretary and assistant head of the division of European affairs.  She then went to London in 1947 as first secretary of the embassy.  In 1951, she went to Finland where she served as counselor of legation and deputy chief of mission.  She was the first woman to serve in this position.

1991 Switzerland stamp
US #2532 – Willis was America’s first ambassador to Switzerland.

In 1953, President Dwight D. Eisenhower made Willis the first US ambassador to Switzerland.  Prior to that, the highest-ranking American diplomat to Switzerland was a minister.  Willis is also considered the first woman to become an ambassador by climbing the career ladder.  Other women had been ambassadors before her, but they were usual appointed for political reasons, as opposed to their professional qualifications.  In 1955, she was the only woman to attend the Big Four Summit Conference in Geneva.  That same year she was also the first appointed career minister.

1971 Eisenhower stamp
US #1402 – Eisenhower appointed Willis to two of her three ambassador posts.

Eisenhower named Willis ambassador to Norway from 1957 to 1961.  John F. Kennedy made her ambassador to Sri Lanka (known as Ceylon at the time) from 1961 until her retirement in 1964. In 1962, she became the first woman to achieve the rank of career ambassador.  After retirement, Willis served as a delegate to the 20th UN General Assembly’s Third Commission on Human Rights and Social Development.  She was also head of the US delegation to the 15th session of the Kennedy Round of Tariffs in Geneva and chairman of the University of Redlands Johnston College Board of Overseers and Long Range Planning Committee.  Willis died in California on July 23, 1983.

Willis earned several awards during her lifetime, including Woman of the Year from the Los Angeles Times and the Eminent Achievement Award from the American Woman’s Association.  Additionally, in 1973 the Foreign Service Association gave her the Foreign Service Cup for her “outstanding contribution to the conduct of foreign relations of the United States.”

 
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U.S. #2532
1991 50¢ Switzerland

 

 

Issue Date: February 22, 1991
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 103,648,000
Printed By: American Bank Note Co
Printing Method: Photogravure
Perforations: 11
Color: Multicolored
 
Switzerland is the oldest operating republic in the world. This commemorative stamp honors its 700th anniversary. 
 
U.S. #2532 is the first U.S. non-airmail commemorative to carry a 50¢ rate since the Trans-Mississippi Series of 1898.
 

Birth of Frances E. Willis

2006 Frances E. Willis stamp
US #4076b – from the 2006 American Diplomats issue

American diplomat Frances E. Willis was born on May 20, 1899, in Metropolis, Illinois.  She was a pioneer in her field – the first woman to become a career foreign service officer, the first US ambassador to Switzerland, and the first female career ambassador, among other notable firsts.

Willis attended Stanford University, earning a degree in history in 1920.  In 1923, she became the first person to receive a Ph.D. in political science at Stanford.  Willis went on to teach history at Goucher College for a year before transferring to Vassar College where she was an assistant professor of political science from 1924 to 1927.

Frances Willis Mystic First Day Cover
US #4076b – Mystic First Day Cover

In 1927, Willis, realized she “didn’t want to just teach political science, [she] wanted to be a part of it.”  Therefore, she left her teaching position and became the third woman in US history to enter the Foreign Service.  As she later recalled, “the more I taught, the more I realized how little I actually knew about Government.  I decided to find out firsthand what it was like.”

Frances Willis Fleetwood First Day Cover
US #4076b – Fleetwood First Day Cover

Willis’s first post was as a consular officer in Valparaiso, Chile.  Over the next few years, she served in Santiago, Stockholm, Brussels, and Luxembourg.  Willis was serving in Brussels when the Nazis invaded Belgium.  At the time, Ambassador Clare Booth Luce and her husband were visiting the ambassador in Brussels.  Willis proceeded to drive them through the German lines to Paris so they could evacuate back to the US.

Frances Willis Classic First Day Cover
US #4076b – Classic First Day Cover

Willis spent most of World War II as first secretary and consul of the US embassy in Madrid.  She was then sent to the US State Department to serve as an assistant to the secretary and assistant head of the division of European affairs.  She then went to London in 1947 as first secretary of the embassy.  In 1951, she went to Finland where she served as counselor of legation and deputy chief of mission.  She was the first woman to serve in this position.

1991 Switzerland stamp
US #2532 – Willis was America’s first ambassador to Switzerland.

In 1953, President Dwight D. Eisenhower made Willis the first US ambassador to Switzerland.  Prior to that, the highest-ranking American diplomat to Switzerland was a minister.  Willis is also considered the first woman to become an ambassador by climbing the career ladder.  Other women had been ambassadors before her, but they were usual appointed for political reasons, as opposed to their professional qualifications.  In 1955, she was the only woman to attend the Big Four Summit Conference in Geneva.  That same year she was also the first appointed career minister.

1971 Eisenhower stamp
US #1402 – Eisenhower appointed Willis to two of her three ambassador posts.

Eisenhower named Willis ambassador to Norway from 1957 to 1961.  John F. Kennedy made her ambassador to Sri Lanka (known as Ceylon at the time) from 1961 until her retirement in 1964. In 1962, she became the first woman to achieve the rank of career ambassador.  After retirement, Willis served as a delegate to the 20th UN General Assembly’s Third Commission on Human Rights and Social Development.  She was also head of the US delegation to the 15th session of the Kennedy Round of Tariffs in Geneva and chairman of the University of Redlands Johnston College Board of Overseers and Long Range Planning Committee.  Willis died in California on July 23, 1983.

Willis earned several awards during her lifetime, including Woman of the Year from the Los Angeles Times and the Eminent Achievement Award from the American Woman’s Association.  Additionally, in 1973 the Foreign Service Association gave her the Foreign Service Cup for her “outstanding contribution to the conduct of foreign relations of the United States.”