#2585 – 1991 29c Contemporary Christmas: Santa and Sleigh

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$1.75
$1.75
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.50
$0.50
2 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM636215x30mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM77336x30mm 25 Horizontal Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$2.50
$2.50
 
U.S. #2585
1991 29¢ Santa and Sleigh
Contemporary Christmas – Booklet
   
Issue Date: October 17, 1991
City: Santa, Idaho
Quantity: 560,000,000
Printed By: Multi-Color Corp. for American Bank Note Company
Printing Method: Lithographed, engraved 
Perforations: 11 on 2 or 3 sides
Color: Multicolored
 
John Berkey's five designs for the contemporary Christmas stamp booklet show a sequence of five scenes of Santa Claus making a delivery on Christmas Eve. The first design, Santa waving from a chimney, was also used for the sheet stamp.
 

NORAD Tracks Santa

On December 24, 1955, NORAD’s predecessor tracked Santa Claus for the first time. 

Prior to this, on December 24, 1948, the US Air Force released a statement that an “early warning radar net to the north” was tracking “one unidentified sleigh, powered by eight reindeer, at 14,000 feet, heading 180 degrees.”  The report was shared with the public, marking the first time the US Armed Forces made a public statement about tracking Santa Claus on Christmas Eve.  No additional reports were released for several years.

Then in 1955, a legend began.  That year, the Sears department store in Colorado Springs had placed an ad in the local newspaper.  It gave a number for children to call to talk to Santa.  One digit of the phone number was incorrect, and the calls actually went to the Colorado Springs’ Continental Air Defense Command (CONAD).  The popular story claims that on December 24, 1955,  a number of children called CONAD on the “red telephone” that connected them to the Strategic Air Command.  Colonel Harry Shoup and his staff were said to have given all the children Santa’s current location.

The legend has been exaggerated over the years, but has some truth to it.  It appears one child did call, though they had misdialed the number, and their call came on November 30.  However, after one of the staff members at CONAD placed a picture of Santa on the board they used to track unidentified aircraft, Shoup saw an opportunity.  He released a statement that read, “CONAD, Army, Navy, and Marine Air Forces will continue to track and guard Santa and his sleigh on his trip to and from the US against possible attack from those who do not believe in Christmas.”

CONAD initially didn’t plan to repeat the event the following year.  When they heard that news organizations were waiting for their report, however, they decided to make it an annual tradition.  The North America Air Defense Command (NORAD) took over for CONAD in 1958.  Over the years, NORAD made these reports more elaborate and exciting.  For instance, in 1960, they reported that a sleigh operated by S. Claus had made an emergency landing on the Hudson Bay.  The Royal Canadian Air Force sent in planes to investigate and they found Santa bandaging a reindeer’s leg.  They then escorted him along part of his journey. 

NORAD also later provided a hotline number for people to call to get real-time updates on Santa’s location.  Volunteers help handle these calls – taking about 40 calls per hour each.  They usually get about 12,000 emails and over 100,000 phone calls from over 200 countries and territories.  NORAD created a website in 1997 that allows visitors to track Santa there as well through maps and videos.  Then in 2011, phone applications (apps) were developed that offer updates and games. 

Click here to visit the NORAD Tracks Santa website. 

 
Read More - Click Here


  • 1940s First Day Covers, Collection of 60 1940s First Day Covers, Collection of 60

    The 1940s were packed with history, and this is your chance to add some of that history to your collection with 60 limited-edition First Day Covers.  You'll see Airmail stamps, commemorative stamps, and definitives.  Order yours now.

    $75.95
    BUY NOW
  • 2002 US Definitive Coll. set of 36, used 2002 US Definitive Collection, Used, 36 Stamps
    Now is a great time to add these stamps to your collection.  You’ll get 36 used stamps SAVE off the regular stamp prices.  Order your 2002 US Definitive Stamp Collection today.
    $6.95
    BUY NOW
  • 1887-98  Reg Issues, 12 stamps, used Classic Definitives, 12 stamps, Used

    Save time and effort with this collector's set of 12 postally used definitive stamps issued from 1887-1898.  These stamps are now all over 110 years old and represent a ton of neat history.  Order today and you'll receive 212, 219, 220, 222, 223, 226, 268, 272, 279, 280, 281 and 283.

    $30.95
    BUY NOW

 

U.S. #2585
1991 29¢ Santa and Sleigh
Contemporary Christmas – Booklet

 

 

Issue Date: October 17, 1991
City: Santa, Idaho
Quantity: 560,000,000
Printed By: Multi-Color Corp. for American Bank Note Company
Printing Method: Lithographed, engraved 
Perforations: 11 on 2 or 3 sides
Color: Multicolored
 
John Berkey's five designs for the contemporary Christmas stamp booklet show a sequence of five scenes of Santa Claus making a delivery on Christmas Eve. The first design, Santa waving from a chimney, was also used for the sheet stamp.
 

NORAD Tracks Santa

On December 24, 1955, NORAD’s predecessor tracked Santa Claus for the first time. 

Prior to this, on December 24, 1948, the US Air Force released a statement that an “early warning radar net to the north” was tracking “one unidentified sleigh, powered by eight reindeer, at 14,000 feet, heading 180 degrees.”  The report was shared with the public, marking the first time the US Armed Forces made a public statement about tracking Santa Claus on Christmas Eve.  No additional reports were released for several years.

Then in 1955, a legend began.  That year, the Sears department store in Colorado Springs had placed an ad in the local newspaper.  It gave a number for children to call to talk to Santa.  One digit of the phone number was incorrect, and the calls actually went to the Colorado Springs’ Continental Air Defense Command (CONAD).  The popular story claims that on December 24, 1955,  a number of children called CONAD on the “red telephone” that connected them to the Strategic Air Command.  Colonel Harry Shoup and his staff were said to have given all the children Santa’s current location.

The legend has been exaggerated over the years, but has some truth to it.  It appears one child did call, though they had misdialed the number, and their call came on November 30.  However, after one of the staff members at CONAD placed a picture of Santa on the board they used to track unidentified aircraft, Shoup saw an opportunity.  He released a statement that read, “CONAD, Army, Navy, and Marine Air Forces will continue to track and guard Santa and his sleigh on his trip to and from the US against possible attack from those who do not believe in Christmas.”

CONAD initially didn’t plan to repeat the event the following year.  When they heard that news organizations were waiting for their report, however, they decided to make it an annual tradition.  The North America Air Defense Command (NORAD) took over for CONAD in 1958.  Over the years, NORAD made these reports more elaborate and exciting.  For instance, in 1960, they reported that a sleigh operated by S. Claus had made an emergency landing on the Hudson Bay.  The Royal Canadian Air Force sent in planes to investigate and they found Santa bandaging a reindeer’s leg.  They then escorted him along part of his journey. 

NORAD also later provided a hotline number for people to call to get real-time updates on Santa’s location.  Volunteers help handle these calls – taking about 40 calls per hour each.  They usually get about 12,000 emails and over 100,000 phone calls from over 200 countries and territories.  NORAD created a website in 1997 that allows visitors to track Santa there as well through maps and videos.  Then in 2011, phone applications (apps) were developed that offer updates and games. 

Click here to visit the NORAD Tracks Santa website.