#3090 – 1996 32c Rural Free Delivery

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$1.30
$1.30
- Used Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$0.20
$0.20
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Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM63725 Horizontal Strip Mounts, Black, Split-back, 215 x 32 millimeters (8-7/16 x 1-1/4 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$7.50
$7.50
- MM67150 Horizontal Mounts, Black, Split-back, Pre-cut, 45 x 32 millimeters (1-3/4 x 1-1/4 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$8.00
$8.00
- MM4202Mystic Clear Mount 45x30mm - 50 precut drop end mounts
Ships in 1 business day. i
$1.95
$1.95
U.S. #3090
1996 32¢ Rural Free Delivery

Issue Date: August 7, 1996
City: Charleston, WV
Quantity: 134,000,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:
Lithographed and engraved
Perforations:
11.2 x 11
Color: Multicolored
 
Though rapidly industrializing, America was still an agrarian society before the turn of the century, with half its population living in rural areas. Before Rural Free Delivery, country people had to travel to a post office to send or receive mail. For the millions of families living on farms, miles from the nearest town and post office, mail was a sometime thing, a special event.
 
A group of influential Georgians, used to modern communications, hired their own private carrier who worked a scheduled route for more than 40 years. This Norwood, Georgia carrier became the model and inspiration for the RFD plan introduced to Congress in 1893. While rural mail services were being tested in communities in 28 states in 1895, groups of 100 families were allowed to petition for future service. By 1901, rural routes served 1.8 million people; by 1920, most rural communities received postal service. Today, an astounding 18 million rural families are served by 35,000 full-time carriers who cover about 730 million miles.
 
The mobile post offices of the early rural carriers opened the world to millions of Americans. Though simpler on its 100th anniversary, RFD still plays a vital role in keeping rural people informed and connected through the delivery of letters, magazines, and newspapers.
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  • 450 Black Mounts, Split-back, containing one pack each of MM501 through MM509 450 Archival-Quality Mystic Mounts

    Mystic mounts are the best way to keep your stamps safe and looking great for years to come.  Stamps are held securely in place against a black background – making the colors "pop" and adding definition to perforations.  With this mount package you'll get 50 split-back mounts of each size collectors most commonly use.

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  • 2018 First-Class Forever Stamp - The Art of Magic souvenir sheet of 3 Get The 2018 Art Of Magic Souvenir Sheet with Special Animation Effect

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  • US Stamp Starter Kit Give Your Grandchildren the Gift of Stamp Collecting

    This is a great album to start with because it pictures U.S. stamps that are easy to find and buy.  As a bonus, we’ll include 100 used U.S. stamps, 1,000 hinges for attaching stamps in their album, and Mystic’s Guide to Stamp Collecting – all for FREE.  It’s a terrific value.

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U.S. #3090
1996 32¢ Rural Free Delivery

Issue Date: August 7, 1996
City: Charleston, WV
Quantity: 134,000,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:
Lithographed and engraved
Perforations:
11.2 x 11
Color: Multicolored
 
Though rapidly industrializing, America was still an agrarian society before the turn of the century, with half its population living in rural areas. Before Rural Free Delivery, country people had to travel to a post office to send or receive mail. For the millions of families living on farms, miles from the nearest town and post office, mail was a sometime thing, a special event.
 
A group of influential Georgians, used to modern communications, hired their own private carrier who worked a scheduled route for more than 40 years. This Norwood, Georgia carrier became the model and inspiration for the RFD plan introduced to Congress in 1893. While rural mail services were being tested in communities in 28 states in 1895, groups of 100 families were allowed to petition for future service. By 1901, rural routes served 1.8 million people; by 1920, most rural communities received postal service. Today, an astounding 18 million rural families are served by 35,000 full-time carriers who cover about 730 million miles.
 
The mobile post offices of the early rural carriers opened the world to millions of Americans. Though simpler on its 100th anniversary, RFD still plays a vital role in keeping rural people informed and connected through the delivery of letters, magazines, and newspapers.