#3170 – 1997 32c Classic Movie Monsters: Boris Karloff as Frankenstein

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$1.60FREE with 320 points!
$1.60
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$1.00
$1.00
3 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM644215x46mm 15 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM214338x46mm 15 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.25
$3.25
 
U.S. #3170
1997 32¢ “Frankenstein”
Classic Movie Monsters

Issue Date: September 30, 1997
City: Universal City, CA
Quantity: 29,000,000
Printed By: Stamp Venturers
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations:
10.2
Color: Multicolored
 
In 1931 the movie Frankenstein made its shocking debut as the first major horror movie with sound. Based on Mary Shelley’s classic novel Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus, published in 1818, it is the story of Dr. Frankenstein, a scientist who creates a living being from the bodies of the dead. Despite his noble intentions, Frankenstein creates a monster.
 
Assembled from body parts stolen from graveyards, the monster is brought to life when Frankenstein raises him through a hole in the roof of his laboratory and he is struck by lightning. When the creature is lowered to the floor and begins to move, Dr. Frankenstein cries, “It’s alive!”
 
Despite his hulking size and revolting appearance, the monster is actually a gentle creature. Although he is responsible for drowning a little girl, the tragedy is due only to his childlike ignorance of the world.
 

Birth of Boris Karloff 

Boris Karloff was born William Henry Pratt on November 23, 1887, in Camberwell, London, England.

The youngest of nine children, Karloff initially pursued a career with the British Government’s Consular Service but left college before graduating.  He then went to Canada where he worked on a farm and held a variety of odd jobs before he discovered acting.  His first performances were in Canadian theater and it was at this time he adopted his stage name, possibly to prevent embarrassing his family, many of who were diplomats.

For nearly a decade, Karloff acted with several different theater companies and continued to perform odd jobs to pay the bills.  The extensive manual labor took a toll on his body and left him with back problems for the rest of his life.  By the late 1910s, Karloff reached Hollywood and appeared in several silent films, though he had yet to make his big break.  Some of these early appearances included The Masked Rider (1919), The Hope Diamond Mystery (1920), and King of the Wild (1931).  Soon Karloff received more significant roles in The Criminal Code (1931), Five Star Final (1931), and Scarface (filmed in 1931 and released in 1932).

Karloff finally got his big break with Frankenstein in 1931.  Despite the uncomfortable costume that included four-inch high, 11-pound shoes and extensive makeup, Karloff brought the monster to life, establishing himself as a horror movie icon.  Within the next year, he had starring roles in The Mummy, The Old Dark House, and The Mask of Fu Manchu.  Though he became known for his horror roles, Karloff also appeared in non-horror films such as John Ford’s epic The Lost Patrol (1934).

Soon, Karloff was paired with another horror star, Bela Lugosi.  Though the two men never had a close friendship off-screen, they would star in a number of movies together over the years including The Black Cat (1934), Gift of Gab (1934), The Raven (1935), and The Invisible Ray (1936).  Karloff would also reprise his role as Frankenstein’s monster several more times over the years.

While continuing to appear in films, Karloff returned to the stage in 1941 for Arsenic and Old Lace.  Later in the decade, he had his own radio and television series, Starring Boris Karloff.  And in 1950, he played Captain Hook in a stage production of Peter Pan, for which he received a Tony Award nomination.

Karloff appeared on a number of television shows in the 1950s and 60s.  This included his last appearance as Frankenstein’s monster for a Halloween episode of Route 66 in 1962.  Karloff enjoyed a resurgence in popularity in 1966 when he narrated and provided the voice for the Grinch in Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas.  He went on to receive a Grammy for Best Recording for Children.

Karloff continued to act in his final years before dying on February 2, 1969, in Sussex, England.

Click here to visit the official Boris Karloff website.

 

 
Read More - Click Here


  • 2020 First-Class Forever Stamps - Bugs Bunny 2020 First-Class Forever Stamps - Bugs Bunny

    In 2020, the United States Postal Service issued a set of 10 new Forever stamps picturing some of Bugs' most iconic costumes.  Add these popular stamps to your collection now!

    $10.95- $21.50
    BUY NOW
  • 2019 Complete Year Set of U.S. Commemoratives and Regular Issues - 116 Stamps 2019 Complete Year Set Stamps

    Save time and money with this year-set. You'll receive every major Scott number issued in 2019 – including the Priority and Express Mail stamps – in one order. It's the easy way to keep your collection up to date. 

    $126.00- $171.00
    BUY NOW
  • 1/2 lb. US Mixture, on/off paper US 1/2 Pound Stamp Mixture

    This fun mixture of U.S. stamps is made up of completely random years, and will contain both used stamps on and off paper. It is packaged by weight, and you will get a full 1/2 lb of stamps to sort through and identify- hours of fun at your kitchen table!

    $19.95
    BUY NOW

 

U.S. #3170
1997 32¢ “Frankenstein”
Classic Movie Monsters

Issue Date: September 30, 1997
City: Universal City, CA
Quantity: 29,000,000
Printed By: Stamp Venturers
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations:
10.2
Color: Multicolored
 
In 1931 the movie Frankenstein made its shocking debut as the first major horror movie with sound. Based on Mary Shelley’s classic novel Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus, published in 1818, it is the story of Dr. Frankenstein, a scientist who creates a living being from the bodies of the dead. Despite his noble intentions, Frankenstein creates a monster.
 
Assembled from body parts stolen from graveyards, the monster is brought to life when Frankenstein raises him through a hole in the roof of his laboratory and he is struck by lightning. When the creature is lowered to the floor and begins to move, Dr. Frankenstein cries, “It’s alive!”
 
Despite his hulking size and revolting appearance, the monster is actually a gentle creature. Although he is responsible for drowning a little girl, the tragedy is due only to his childlike ignorance of the world.
 

Birth of Boris Karloff 

Boris Karloff was born William Henry Pratt on November 23, 1887, in Camberwell, London, England.

The youngest of nine children, Karloff initially pursued a career with the British Government’s Consular Service but left college before graduating.  He then went to Canada where he worked on a farm and held a variety of odd jobs before he discovered acting.  His first performances were in Canadian theater and it was at this time he adopted his stage name, possibly to prevent embarrassing his family, many of who were diplomats.

For nearly a decade, Karloff acted with several different theater companies and continued to perform odd jobs to pay the bills.  The extensive manual labor took a toll on his body and left him with back problems for the rest of his life.  By the late 1910s, Karloff reached Hollywood and appeared in several silent films, though he had yet to make his big break.  Some of these early appearances included The Masked Rider (1919), The Hope Diamond Mystery (1920), and King of the Wild (1931).  Soon Karloff received more significant roles in The Criminal Code (1931), Five Star Final (1931), and Scarface (filmed in 1931 and released in 1932).

Karloff finally got his big break with Frankenstein in 1931.  Despite the uncomfortable costume that included four-inch high, 11-pound shoes and extensive makeup, Karloff brought the monster to life, establishing himself as a horror movie icon.  Within the next year, he had starring roles in The Mummy, The Old Dark House, and The Mask of Fu Manchu.  Though he became known for his horror roles, Karloff also appeared in non-horror films such as John Ford’s epic The Lost Patrol (1934).

Soon, Karloff was paired with another horror star, Bela Lugosi.  Though the two men never had a close friendship off-screen, they would star in a number of movies together over the years including The Black Cat (1934), Gift of Gab (1934), The Raven (1935), and The Invisible Ray (1936).  Karloff would also reprise his role as Frankenstein’s monster several more times over the years.

While continuing to appear in films, Karloff returned to the stage in 1941 for Arsenic and Old Lace.  Later in the decade, he had his own radio and television series, Starring Boris Karloff.  And in 1950, he played Captain Hook in a stage production of Peter Pan, for which he received a Tony Award nomination.

Karloff appeared on a number of television shows in the 1950s and 60s.  This included his last appearance as Frankenstein’s monster for a Halloween episode of Route 66 in 1962.  Karloff enjoyed a resurgence in popularity in 1966 when he narrated and provided the voice for the Grinch in Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas.  He went on to receive a Grammy for Best Recording for Children.

Karloff continued to act in his final years before dying on February 2, 1969, in Sussex, England.

Click here to visit the official Boris Karloff website.