#3183f – 1998 32c Celebrate the Century - 1910s: Panama Canal Opens

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$1.95
$1.95
3 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM641215x38mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM214238x38mm 15 Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$1.50
$1.50
 
U.S. #3183f
32¢ Panama Canal Opens
 Celebrate the Century – 1910s
 
Issue Date: February 3, 1998
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 12,533,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method: Lithographed
Perforations:
11.5
Color: Multicolored
 

Opening Of The Panama Canal 

After a decade of construction, the Panama Canal opened to traffic on August 15, 1914.

For centuries, explorers, kings, and capitalists sought a way to cut their shipping times by cutting through the isthmus of Panama. In 1903, the United States helped Panama declare its independence from Colombia. President Theodore Roosevelt saw the creation of a canal across Panama as vital to America’s role as a global power. The following year began construction on the Eighth Wonder of the World – the Panama Canal. Roosevelt was so vested in the project that he visited the work site – making him the first sitting president to leave the continental U.S. during his term.

The construction was an arduous undertaking, costing the U.S. $375 million and 5,600 lives. Over the course of the 10-year project, over 75,000 people from the U.S., Barbados, Martinique, Guadeloupe, and other nearby islands braved the harsh conditions to help make the canal a reality.

A grand celebration was to be held on August 15, 1914, to celebrate the official opening of the Panama Canal. A fleet of international warships was to assemble off Hampton Roads, Virginia. From there, they would travel through the Panama Canal to San Francisco for the Panama-Pacific International Exposition.

However, World War I intervened. The grand opening was a modest affair. There were no international dignitaries in attendance, although Colonel Goethals (pictured on U.S. #856) watched from a railcar as the cement-carrying American steamship SS Ancon traveled the canal.

 
Read More - Click Here


  • Legends of Baseball Portraits First Day Covers, Set of 5 Legends of Baseball Portrait First Day Covers

    This set includes five special-edition First Day Covers featuring the 2000 Legends of Baseball US stamps.  Each cover was canceled on the stamps' first day of issue and includes a large vintage photograph of the baseball player pictured on the stamp.  You'll see Jackie Robinson, Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Roberto Clemente, and Cy Young. Order yours today!

    $29.95
    BUY NOW
  • WWI Stamp and Cover Collection:Set of 28 Worldwide Stamps & 3 US First Day Covers WWI Stamp and Cover Collection
    If you're a World War I history-buff, then this is just the collector's set for you.  It includes 8 US stamps, 20 Worldwide stamps, and 3 US First Day Covers – all honoring various events and people of World War I.  It's a great start to a new collection or addition to your current one.
    $25.95
    BUY NOW
  • 1990-2005 Giant Definitive Coll.195v, U 1990-2005 Giant Definitive Collection
    This giant set of 195 all different postally used definitive postage stamps is an instant album filler. Order yours today to get these great stamps at a great value.
    $74.95
    BUY NOW

 

U.S. #3183f
32¢ Panama Canal Opens
 Celebrate the Century – 1910s
 
Issue Date: February 3, 1998
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 12,533,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method: Lithographed
Perforations:
11.5
Color: Multicolored
 

Opening Of The Panama Canal 

After a decade of construction, the Panama Canal opened to traffic on August 15, 1914.

For centuries, explorers, kings, and capitalists sought a way to cut their shipping times by cutting through the isthmus of Panama. In 1903, the United States helped Panama declare its independence from Colombia. President Theodore Roosevelt saw the creation of a canal across Panama as vital to America’s role as a global power. The following year began construction on the Eighth Wonder of the World – the Panama Canal. Roosevelt was so vested in the project that he visited the work site – making him the first sitting president to leave the continental U.S. during his term.

The construction was an arduous undertaking, costing the U.S. $375 million and 5,600 lives. Over the course of the 10-year project, over 75,000 people from the U.S., Barbados, Martinique, Guadeloupe, and other nearby islands braved the harsh conditions to help make the canal a reality.

A grand celebration was to be held on August 15, 1914, to celebrate the official opening of the Panama Canal. A fleet of international warships was to assemble off Hampton Roads, Virginia. From there, they would travel through the Panama Canal to San Francisco for the Panama-Pacific International Exposition.

However, World War I intervened. The grand opening was a modest affair. There were no international dignitaries in attendance, although Colonel Goethals (pictured on U.S. #856) watched from a railcar as the cement-carrying American steamship SS Ancon traveled the canal.