#3188c – 1999 33c Man Walks on Moon

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$1.95
$1.95
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM641215x38mm 25 Horizontal Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1 business day. i
$7.75
$7.75
- MM214238x38mm 15 Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1 business day. i
$1.50
$1.50
U.S. #3188c
37¢ Man Walks on the Moon
Celebrate the Century – 1960s
 
Issue Date: September 17, 1999
City: Green Bay, WI
Quantity: 8,000,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed, engraved
Perforations:
11.5
Color: Multicolored
 
Americans made huge advances in space exploration in the 1960s. The first U.S. effort to put an astronaut in orbit was the Mercury project. The next steps into space were taken under the Gemini and Apollo programs. In 1969, Apollo 10 astronauts determined a lunar module could land on the Sea of Tranquility. After that, it was decided Apollo 11 would land Americans on the moon.
 
Neil Armstrong, Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin, and Michael Collins left for the moon at 9:32 a.m. on July 16, 1969. It took Apollo 11 four days to reach its destination. On July 20, Armstrong and Aldrin descended to the moon inside the lunar module Eagle. Collins remained in the command module ColumbiaEagle landed on the moon at 4:17 p.m., and Armstrong stepped onto the moon’s surface about six hours later. An estimated 600 million people – a fifth of the planet’s population – witnessed the live transmission of Armstrong’s “giant leap.”
 
The astronauts gathered about 46 pounds of rocks and soil. They left an Apollo 11 patch, a pouch with messages from 73 nations, an olive branch, and a plaque, which is pictured on this cover. It reads: “Here men from the planet Earth first set foot upon the moon July 1969, A.D. We came in peace for all mankind.” It was signed by the three astronauts and President Richard Nixon.
Read More - Click Here


  • Confederate Stamp Club Introductory Offer Join Mystic's Confederate Stamp Club and Save 30%

    Collect stamps over 155 years old issued by the short-lived Confederate States of America.  When the Union shut down the mail service to the South, the Confederate States had no choice but to print their own postage stamps.  The resulting stamps are full of interesting philatelic history!

    $13.95
    BUY NOW
  • 450 Black Mounts, Split-back, containing one pack each of MM501 through MM509 450 Archival-Quality Mystic Mounts

    Mystic mounts are the best way to keep your stamps safe and looking great for years to come.  Stamps are held securely in place against a black background – making the colors "pop" and adding definition to perforations.  With this mount package you'll get 50 split-back mounts of each size collectors most commonly use.

    $29.50
    BUY NOW
  • US Stamp Starter Kit Give Your Grandchildren the Gift of Stamp Collecting

    This is a great album to start with because it pictures U.S. stamps that are easy to find and buy.  As a bonus, we’ll include 100 used U.S. stamps, 1,000 hinges for attaching stamps in their album, and Mystic’s Guide to Stamp Collecting – all for FREE.  It’s a terrific value.

    $14.95
    BUY NOW

U.S. #3188c
37¢ Man Walks on the Moon
Celebrate the Century – 1960s
 
Issue Date: September 17, 1999
City: Green Bay, WI
Quantity: 8,000,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed, engraved
Perforations:
11.5
Color: Multicolored
 
Americans made huge advances in space exploration in the 1960s. The first U.S. effort to put an astronaut in orbit was the Mercury project. The next steps into space were taken under the Gemini and Apollo programs. In 1969, Apollo 10 astronauts determined a lunar module could land on the Sea of Tranquility. After that, it was decided Apollo 11 would land Americans on the moon.
 
Neil Armstrong, Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin, and Michael Collins left for the moon at 9:32 a.m. on July 16, 1969. It took Apollo 11 four days to reach its destination. On July 20, Armstrong and Aldrin descended to the moon inside the lunar module Eagle. Collins remained in the command module ColumbiaEagle landed on the moon at 4:17 p.m., and Armstrong stepped onto the moon’s surface about six hours later. An estimated 600 million people – a fifth of the planet’s population – witnessed the live transmission of Armstrong’s “giant leap.”
 
The astronauts gathered about 46 pounds of rocks and soil. They left an Apollo 11 patch, a pouch with messages from 73 nations, an olive branch, and a plaque, which is pictured on this cover. It reads: “Here men from the planet Earth first set foot upon the moon July 1969, A.D. We came in peace for all mankind.” It was signed by the three astronauts and President Richard Nixon.