#3191l – 2000 33c Celebrate the Century - 1990s: "Titanic"

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- Mint Stamp(s)
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U.S. #3191l
2000 33¢ Blockbuster Film
Celebrate the Century – 1990s

Issue Date: May 2, 2000
City: Monterey, CA
Quantity: 8,250,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11 ½
Color: Multicolored
 
The thrilling action, astonishing special effects, and romantic story of “Titanic” combined to make this film one of the most spectacular in history. It made $1.8 billion worldwide, earned a record-tying 11 Academy Awards, and sold 50 million copies on home video. “Titanic” was so popular that many moviegoers went to the theater to see it two or more times.
 
“Titanic” opened in the U.S. on December 19, 1997. The story of the 17-year-old American aristocrat (Rose) who falls in love with a destitute free spirit (Jack) captivated audiences. Director James Cameron wanted to keep all the details related to the sinking of the Titanic true while telling the fictional love story.
 
The film also broke records as the most expensive ever made to date. Initial projections said “Titanic” would cost $110 million. The escalating costs led Cameron to sacrifice his paycheck to get the over $200 million film made as he had envisioned it.
 
A special 40-acre studio was built in Rosarita Beach, Mexico, for the filming of “Titanic.” A 780-foot replica of the ship was built there. In an effort to keep the story as historically accurate as possible, custom-made lighting fixtures, furniture, china, and other items were created – and later destroyed – when the ship “sank.”
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U.S. #3191l
2000 33¢ Blockbuster Film
Celebrate the Century – 1990s

Issue Date: May 2, 2000
City: Monterey, CA
Quantity: 8,250,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11 ½
Color: Multicolored
 
The thrilling action, astonishing special effects, and romantic story of “Titanic” combined to make this film one of the most spectacular in history. It made $1.8 billion worldwide, earned a record-tying 11 Academy Awards, and sold 50 million copies on home video. “Titanic” was so popular that many moviegoers went to the theater to see it two or more times.
 
“Titanic” opened in the U.S. on December 19, 1997. The story of the 17-year-old American aristocrat (Rose) who falls in love with a destitute free spirit (Jack) captivated audiences. Director James Cameron wanted to keep all the details related to the sinking of the Titanic true while telling the fictional love story.
 
The film also broke records as the most expensive ever made to date. Initial projections said “Titanic” would cost $110 million. The escalating costs led Cameron to sacrifice his paycheck to get the over $200 million film made as he had envisioned it.
 
A special 40-acre studio was built in Rosarita Beach, Mexico, for the filming of “Titanic.” A 780-foot replica of the ship was built there. In an effort to keep the story as historically accurate as possible, custom-made lighting fixtures, furniture, china, and other items were created – and later destroyed – when the ship “sank.”