#3291 – 1999 33c Arctic Animals: Polar Bear

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$1.60
$1.60
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.70
$0.70
2 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM644215x46mm 15 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM50636x46mm 50 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
U.S. #3291
33¢ Polar Bear
Arctic Animals
 
Issue Date: March 12, 1999
City: Barrow, AK
Quantity: 73,155,000
Printed By: Banknote Corp. of America
Printing Method: Lithographed
Perforations:
11
Color: Multicolored
 
People long believed that the Arctic area was a cold, barren place where life could not exist. But after many years of exploration, scientists discovered that a variety of plants and animals are able to survive there.
 
The region includes the Arctic Ocean, thousands of islands, and the northern parts of Europe, Asia, and North America. During winter, when temperatures can drop to -65 degrees, sunshine never reaches much of the Arctic. But with temperatures in the 50s in summer months, berries, flowers, and other plants are able to grow.
 
Animal life in the Arctic is limited in species but rich in numbers. Herds of caribou and reindeer, the most common arctic animals, roam the pastures. Wolves, sables, bears, foxes, and hares provide food and fur for man. The female lemming can be responsible for more than 100 offspring in a year. Under extreme conditions, some animals, such as the snowy owl, may migrate south for the winter. The plant life which feeds the animals completes this virtually self-sufficient circle of life.
 
Unlike other warm-blooded mammals, animals living in the Arctic do not hibernate in winter because warm shelters are impossible to find. A few animals, including the Arctic ground squirrel, attempt to hibernate, but shiver themselves awake after only a few days.
Read More - Click Here


  • Mini Mix, approximately 500 Stamps Mini Mix, 500 Worldwide Stamps

    Get an instant stamp collection in one simple step.  Order Mystic's mini-mix and you'll get 500-plus U.S. and foreign stamps on and off paper.

    $19.95
    BUY NOW
  • 1887-98  Reg Issues, 12 stamps, used 1887-98 Regular Issue, 12 Used Stamps
    Save time and effort with this collector's set of 12 postally used definitive stamps issued from 1887-1898.  These stamps are now all over 100 years old and represent a ton of neat history.  Order today!
    $30.95
    BUY NOW
  • German Zeppelin Facsimiles, 8v Mint German Zeppelin Facsimiles
    The original set of these overprinted German Graf Zeppelin stamps is very valuable. These high-quality facsimiles offered here were created in Germany and will allow you to affordably fill the spaces for these stamps in your worldwide album and enjoy their classic designs.
    $9.95
    BUY NOW

U.S. #3291
33¢ Polar Bear
Arctic Animals
 
Issue Date: March 12, 1999
City: Barrow, AK
Quantity: 73,155,000
Printed By: Banknote Corp. of America
Printing Method: Lithographed
Perforations:
11
Color: Multicolored
 
People long believed that the Arctic area was a cold, barren place where life could not exist. But after many years of exploration, scientists discovered that a variety of plants and animals are able to survive there.
 
The region includes the Arctic Ocean, thousands of islands, and the northern parts of Europe, Asia, and North America. During winter, when temperatures can drop to -65 degrees, sunshine never reaches much of the Arctic. But with temperatures in the 50s in summer months, berries, flowers, and other plants are able to grow.
 
Animal life in the Arctic is limited in species but rich in numbers. Herds of caribou and reindeer, the most common arctic animals, roam the pastures. Wolves, sables, bears, foxes, and hares provide food and fur for man. The female lemming can be responsible for more than 100 offspring in a year. Under extreme conditions, some animals, such as the snowy owl, may migrate south for the winter. The plant life which feeds the animals completes this virtually self-sufficient circle of life.
 
Unlike other warm-blooded mammals, animals living in the Arctic do not hibernate in winter because warm shelters are impossible to find. A few animals, including the Arctic ground squirrel, attempt to hibernate, but shiver themselves awake after only a few days.