#3343 – 1999 33c Hollywood Composers: Alfred Newman

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U.S. #3343
33¢ Alfred Newman

Hollywood Composers

Issue Date: September 16, 1999
City: Los Angeles, CA
Quantity: 8,500,000
Printed By: Sterling Sommer for Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11
Color: Multicolored
 
Alfred Newman (1907-1970) was one of the most respected music composers and directors in Hollywood. He was nominated to receive an Academy Award for best music a record 44 times. His nine Oscar wins set a record that is unlikely ever to be broken.
 
The oldest of ten children born to a poor produce seller in New Haven, Connecticut, Newman displayed a musical talent at a young age. He worked his way up from vaudeville to the Broadway orchestra pit, and eventually gained the attention of composer Irving Berlin. Berlin made the move to Hollywood when sound pictures had just started being produced, and arranged for Newman to go with him.
 
In the early years of his career, Newman worked with Samuel Goldwyn and United Artists. Later he worked as the music director at 20th Century Fox. Newman’s first Academy Award came in 1939 for “Alexander’s Ragtime Band.” His last Oscar was for the 1967 film “Camelot.”
 
Newman’s 40-year career as a Hollywood composer made him an authority on film music. He was often approached by other music arrangers and composers when the movie they were working on ran into trouble. His final soundtrack, for “Airport” (1970), earned Alfred Newman his last Academy Award nomination.
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U.S. #3343
33¢ Alfred Newman

Hollywood Composers

Issue Date: September 16, 1999
City: Los Angeles, CA
Quantity: 8,500,000
Printed By: Sterling Sommer for Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11
Color: Multicolored
 
Alfred Newman (1907-1970) was one of the most respected music composers and directors in Hollywood. He was nominated to receive an Academy Award for best music a record 44 times. His nine Oscar wins set a record that is unlikely ever to be broken.
 
The oldest of ten children born to a poor produce seller in New Haven, Connecticut, Newman displayed a musical talent at a young age. He worked his way up from vaudeville to the Broadway orchestra pit, and eventually gained the attention of composer Irving Berlin. Berlin made the move to Hollywood when sound pictures had just started being produced, and arranged for Newman to go with him.
 
In the early years of his career, Newman worked with Samuel Goldwyn and United Artists. Later he worked as the music director at 20th Century Fox. Newman’s first Academy Award came in 1939 for “Alexander’s Ragtime Band.” His last Oscar was for the 1967 film “Camelot.”
 
Newman’s 40-year career as a Hollywood composer made him an authority on film music. He was often approached by other music arrangers and composers when the movie they were working on ran into trouble. His final soundtrack, for “Airport” (1970), earned Alfred Newman his last Academy Award nomination.