#3665-68 – 2002 37c Women in Journalism, s/a set/4

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U.S. #3665-68
37¢ Women in Journalism

Issue Date: September 14, 2002
City: Fort Worth, TX
Printed by: American Packaging Corporation for Sennett Security Products
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations:
Serpentine Die Cut 11 x 10.5
Quantity: 61,000,000
Color: Multicolored
Please note:  Due to the layout of the pane, the se-tenant may or may not be provided in Scott Catalogue order.
 
Newspapers had limited roles for women reporters in the first half of the twentieth century. These stamps honor four women who broke the mold. They persevered and won the respect of their peers for their work in investigative journalism, political reporting, and war correspondence. 
 
Marguerite Higgins (1920-66) won a Pulitzer Prize for international reporting, the first awarded to a woman, for her coverage of the Korean War. Her career as a war correspondent began at the end of World War II and continued into the Vietnam War.
 
America’s first great woman journalist, Ida M. Tarbell (1857-1944) revealed the illegal methods John D. Rockefeller used to monopolize the early oil industry. As a result, the U.S. government sued Standard Oil for violation of the nation’s anti-trust laws.
 
A tough investigative reporter, Ethel L. Payne (1911-91) was known as the “First Lady of the Black Press.” Payne reported on key events of the modern civil rights movement. She was the first black female war correspondent in Vietnam and the first black woman commentator on a major radio and television network. 
 
Nellie Bly (1867?-1922) pioneered as an undercover reporter with daring exposés about the poor and the poorly treated. In 1889, she traveled around the world in 72 days, a sensational story covered by her newspaper, the New York World.
 
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U.S. #3665-68
37¢ Women in Journalism

Issue Date: September 14, 2002
City: Fort Worth, TX
Printed by: American Packaging Corporation for Sennett Security Products
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations:
Serpentine Die Cut 11 x 10.5
Quantity: 61,000,000
Color: Multicolored
Please note:  Due to the layout of the pane, the se-tenant may or may not be provided in Scott Catalogue order.
 
Newspapers had limited roles for women reporters in the first half of the twentieth century. These stamps honor four women who broke the mold. They persevered and won the respect of their peers for their work in investigative journalism, political reporting, and war correspondence. 
 
Marguerite Higgins (1920-66) won a Pulitzer Prize for international reporting, the first awarded to a woman, for her coverage of the Korean War. Her career as a war correspondent began at the end of World War II and continued into the Vietnam War.
 
America’s first great woman journalist, Ida M. Tarbell (1857-1944) revealed the illegal methods John D. Rockefeller used to monopolize the early oil industry. As a result, the U.S. government sued Standard Oil for violation of the nation’s anti-trust laws.
 
A tough investigative reporter, Ethel L. Payne (1911-91) was known as the “First Lady of the Black Press.” Payne reported on key events of the modern civil rights movement. She was the first black female war correspondent in Vietnam and the first black woman commentator on a major radio and television network. 
 
Nellie Bly (1867?-1922) pioneered as an undercover reporter with daring exposés about the poor and the poorly treated. In 1889, she traveled around the world in 72 days, a sensational story covered by her newspaper, the New York World.