#3922 – 2005 37c Advances in Aviation: Consolidated B-24 Liberator

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U.S. #3922
37¢ B-24 Liberator
American Advances in Aviation
 
Issue Date: July 29, 2005
City: Oshkosh, WI
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
Serpentine Die Cut 10.75 x 10.5
Quantity: 110,000,000
Color: Multicolored
 
Prior to U.S. entry into World War II, Consolidated Aircraft designed the B-24 Liberator, a bomber whose wing had less drag than that of the earlier B-17. The deep, slab-sided fuselage (body) held an 8,000-pound bomb load, two tons more than that of the B-17. The B-24 also had a greater range than the B-17.
 
Because of its long range, the Liberator was able to perform missions over the Pacific Ocean and to patrol the North Atlantic Ocean where German submarines preyed on Allied ships.
 
The Liberator is best remembered for “Operation Tidalwave” in August 1943. In a daring, low-altitude daylight attack by 177 aircraft on oil refineries in Romania, massive damage was inflicted on the targets at a cost of 54 planes.
 
The B-24 was the most numerous American bomber of World War II. By the end of the war, a total of 19,203 Liberators had been manufactured.
 
Though primarily a heavy bomber, the Liberator was also a fighter, transport, tanker, reconnaissance, patrol, and anti-submarine aircraft. The B-24 Liberator served the U.S. Navy and the U.S. Army Air Force throughout World War II, in addition to various British Commonwealth air forces.
 
Prior to U.S. entry into World War II, Consolidated Aircraft designed the B-24 Liberator. Because of its long range, the Liberator was able to perform missions over the Pacific Ocean and to patrol the North Atlantic Ocean where German submarines preyed on Allied ships.
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U.S. #3922
37¢ B-24 Liberator
American Advances in Aviation
 
Issue Date: July 29, 2005
City: Oshkosh, WI
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
Serpentine Die Cut 10.75 x 10.5
Quantity: 110,000,000
Color: Multicolored
 
Prior to U.S. entry into World War II, Consolidated Aircraft designed the B-24 Liberator, a bomber whose wing had less drag than that of the earlier B-17. The deep, slab-sided fuselage (body) held an 8,000-pound bomb load, two tons more than that of the B-17. The B-24 also had a greater range than the B-17.
 
Because of its long range, the Liberator was able to perform missions over the Pacific Ocean and to patrol the North Atlantic Ocean where German submarines preyed on Allied ships.
 
The Liberator is best remembered for “Operation Tidalwave” in August 1943. In a daring, low-altitude daylight attack by 177 aircraft on oil refineries in Romania, massive damage was inflicted on the targets at a cost of 54 planes.
 
The B-24 was the most numerous American bomber of World War II. By the end of the war, a total of 19,203 Liberators had been manufactured.
 
Though primarily a heavy bomber, the Liberator was also a fighter, transport, tanker, reconnaissance, patrol, and anti-submarine aircraft. The B-24 Liberator served the U.S. Navy and the U.S. Army Air Force throughout World War II, in addition to various British Commonwealth air forces.
 

Prior to U.S. entry into World War II, Consolidated Aircraft designed the B-24 Liberator. Because of its long range, the Liberator was able to perform missions over the Pacific Ocean and to patrol the North Atlantic Ocean where German submarines preyed on Allied ships.