#3937a – 2005 37c More Perfect Union-Exec. Order

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$2.00
$2.00
3 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM642215x41mm 15 Horizontal Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1 business day. i
$7.75
$7.75
- MM212650x41mm 2 Horizontal Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1 business day. i
$1.00
$1.00
U.S. #3937a
37¢ Executive Order 9981
To Form a More Perfect Union
 
Issue Date: August 27, 2005
City: Washington, DC
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method: Lithographed
Perforations:
Serpentine Die Cut 10.75 x 10.5
Quantity: 5,000,000
Color: Multicolored
 
Early American laws barred blacks from the military, but in times of war, white leaders recruited both slave and free blacks. The Continental Army had 5,000 African-Americans, and at least 216,000 black men served in the Union forces during the Civil War.
 
In that war, blacks suffered unequal pay, promotion, supplies, and services. “Jim Crow” discrimination in the military continued for decades after the Civil War.
 
Even so, large numbers of African-Americans still volunteered to fight for their country. One million African-Americans served in the military during World War II. Many black servicemen hoped their military service would earn them equal status in U.S. society. When they returned home, they were impatient with continuing anti-Negro discrimination and violence.
 
Black leaders pressed President Harry Truman to end military segregation. Truman was aware how important the black vote was to his Democratic Party. He knew that integration would also help America win Cold War allies among Third World countries.
 
On July 26, 1948, Truman signed Executive Order 9981 ordering “...equality of treatment and opportunity for all persons in the armed services without regard to race, color, religion or national origin.”
Read More - Click Here


  • Imperforate Stamp Club Introductory Offer - 2015 49c A Charlie Brown Christmas Join Mystic's Imperforate Stamp Club and Save 30%

    Collect some of the scarcest US stamps issued in the last decade.  From 2012 to 2016, the USPS issued extremely limited quantities of imperforate stamps (as few as 10,000 in some cases).  On sale for just four years, it can be difficult to find them anywhere today.

    $18.95
    BUY NOW
  • 450 Black Mounts, Split-back, containing one pack each of MM501 through MM509 450 Archival-Quality Mystic Mounts

    Mystic mounts are the best way to keep your stamps safe and looking great for years to come.  Stamps are held securely in place against a black background – making the colors "pop" and adding definition to perforations.  With this mount package you'll get 50 split-back mounts of each size collectors most commonly use.

    $29.50
    BUY NOW
  • US Stamp Starter Kit U.S. Stamp Starter Kit

    This is a great album to start with because it pictures U.S. stamps that are easy to find and buy.  As a bonus, we’ll include 100 used U.S. stamps, 1,000 hinges for attaching stamps in their album, and Mystic’s Guide to Stamp Collecting – all for FREE.  It’s a terrific value.

    $14.95
    BUY NOW

U.S. #3937a
37¢ Executive Order 9981
To Form a More Perfect Union
 
Issue Date: August 27, 2005
City: Washington, DC
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method: Lithographed
Perforations:
Serpentine Die Cut 10.75 x 10.5
Quantity: 5,000,000
Color: Multicolored
 
Early American laws barred blacks from the military, but in times of war, white leaders recruited both slave and free blacks. The Continental Army had 5,000 African-Americans, and at least 216,000 black men served in the Union forces during the Civil War.
 
In that war, blacks suffered unequal pay, promotion, supplies, and services. “Jim Crow” discrimination in the military continued for decades after the Civil War.
 
Even so, large numbers of African-Americans still volunteered to fight for their country. One million African-Americans served in the military during World War II. Many black servicemen hoped their military service would earn them equal status in U.S. society. When they returned home, they were impatient with continuing anti-Negro discrimination and violence.
 
Black leaders pressed President Harry Truman to end military segregation. Truman was aware how important the black vote was to his Democratic Party. He knew that integration would also help America win Cold War allies among Third World countries.
 
On July 26, 1948, Truman signed Executive Order 9981 ordering “...equality of treatment and opportunity for all persons in the armed services without regard to race, color, religion or national origin.”