#4318 – 2011 First-Class Forever Stamp - Flags of Our Nation: Puerto Rico

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$3.00
$3.00
- Used Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$0.75
$0.75
1 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM63625 Horizontal Strip Mounts, Black, Split-back, 215 x 30 millimeters (8-7/16 x 1-3/16 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$7.50
$7.50
- MM69950 Horizontal Mounts, Black, Split-back, Pre-cut, 50 x 30 millimeters (1-15/16 x 1-3/16 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$4.00
$4.00
 
U.S. #4318
2011 44¢ Puerto Rico
Flags of Our Nation

Issue Date: August 11, 2011
City: Columbus, Ohio
Printed By: Sennett Security Products
Printing Method: Photogravure
Color: multicolored
 
Flags of Our Nation, Set V: The Flags of Our Nation stamps issued in 2011 is the fifth group of the series. The stamps show historic state flags, as well as a “snapshot” image that shares some of each state’s character.
 
Puerto Rico’s flag was a symbol of rebellion, which became the national flag of the commonwealth.  The Caribbean island was ruled by Spain, then the U.S. Its people tried to gain freedom from Spain in a rebellion called El Grito de Lares (The Cry of Lares). The defeated leaders were exiled to New York City, where they continued to plan for an independent nation. A flag, based on the Cuban version, was adopted in 1895 by the Puerto Rican Revolutionary Committee. Three red stripes represented the blood of warriors. Two white stripes stood for victory and peace, which would come from independence. A white star on a blue triangle symbolized the island of Puerto Rico surrounded by the blue sky and water. The triangle stood for the three branches of government. 
 
The flag was brought to Puerto Rico and carried in a revolt in the town of Yauco. The nationals were defeated by the Spanish and the flag was outlawed. When Puerto Rico became part of the U.S. after the Spanish-American War, it was still illegal to fly the Puerto Rican flag in public or talk of independence. On March 3, 1952, the flag was adopted by the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and could finally be proudly flown all over the island. 
 
Read More - Click Here


  • 450 Black Mounts, Split-back, containing one pack each of MM501 through MM509 450 Archival-Quality Mystic Mounts

    Mystic mounts are the best way to keep your stamps safe and looking great for years to come.  Stamps are held securely in place against a black background – making the colors "pop" and adding definition to perforations.  With this mount package you'll get 50 split-back mounts of each size collectors most commonly use.

    $29.50
    BUY NOW
  • 2018 50¢ The Art of Magic souvenir sheet Get The 2018 ‘Art Of Magic’ Souvenir Sheet with Special Animation Effect

    Own a mint souvenir sheet of three Art of Magic stamps featuring a white rabbit seeming to appear and disappear out of a black top hat.  The special animation effect was created using lenticular printing and makes this souvenir sheet a fun addition to your collection.  Get yours now.

    $3.95- $6.95
    BUY NOW
  • US Stamp Starter Kit Give Your Grandchildren the Gift of Stamp Collecting

    This is a great album to start with because it pictures U.S. stamps that are easy to find and buy.  As a bonus, we’ll include 100 used U.S. stamps, 1,000 hinges for attaching stamps in their album, and Mystic’s Guide to Stamp Collecting – all for FREE.  It’s a terrific value.

    $14.95
    BUY NOW

 

U.S. #4318
2011 44¢ Puerto Rico
Flags of Our Nation

Issue Date: August 11, 2011
City: Columbus, Ohio
Printed By: Sennett Security Products
Printing Method: Photogravure
Color: multicolored
 
Flags of Our Nation, Set V: The Flags of Our Nation stamps issued in 2011 is the fifth group of the series. The stamps show historic state flags, as well as a “snapshot” image that shares some of each state’s character.
 
Puerto Rico’s flag was a symbol of rebellion, which became the national flag of the commonwealth.  The Caribbean island was ruled by Spain, then the U.S. Its people tried to gain freedom from Spain in a rebellion called El Grito de Lares (The Cry of Lares). The defeated leaders were exiled to New York City, where they continued to plan for an independent nation. A flag, based on the Cuban version, was adopted in 1895 by the Puerto Rican Revolutionary Committee. Three red stripes represented the blood of warriors. Two white stripes stood for victory and peace, which would come from independence. A white star on a blue triangle symbolized the island of Puerto Rico surrounded by the blue sky and water. The triangle stood for the three branches of government. 
 
The flag was brought to Puerto Rico and carried in a revolt in the town of Yauco. The nationals were defeated by the Spanish and the flag was outlawed. When Puerto Rico became part of the U.S. after the Spanish-American War, it was still illegal to fly the Puerto Rican flag in public or talk of independence. On March 3, 1952, the flag was adopted by the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and could finally be proudly flown all over the island.