#4455 – 2010 44c Adopt a Shelter Pet-Golden Retr

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- Mint Stamp(s)
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- MM63625 Horizontal Strip Mounts, Black, Split-back, 215 x 30 millimeters (8-7/16 x 1-3/16 inches)
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- MM773Mystic Black Mount Size 36/30 (25)
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U.S. #4455
Animal Rescue

Issue Date: April 30, 2010
City: North Hollywood, CA
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
Serpentine Die Cut 10.75
Color: Multicolored
 
Robin was a twelve-year-old Shih Tzu. All she had known her whole life was the elderly woman who cared for her. When the woman grew ill and couldn’t care for her anymore, Robin ended up in a shelter, alone and scared. The woman who came into the shelter looking for a companion was also lonely and afraid. Robin was the perfect fit and they bonded immediately. Robin will now spend the rest of her days loved and cared for, never again alone.
 
While Robin’s owner had trained her, many pet owners are uneducated in basic obedience training. Their lack of knowledge frequently results in behavioral problems, with the fault attributed to the animal rather than its owner. 
 
In a survey of nearly 4,000 owners who had given up their pets, only six percent had formal obedience training. More than half of them believed their pets had misbehaved out of spite, and one third mistakenly believed rubbing the animal’s nose in its messes would help house train the pet.
 
For first-time animal owners, education is the key to a happy relationship with their pet. Shelter workers, veterinarians, kennel clubs, and professional trainers are all good resources to help ensure a warm and loving bond between pet and owner.
 
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U.S. #4455
Animal Rescue

Issue Date: April 30, 2010
City: North Hollywood, CA
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
Serpentine Die Cut 10.75
Color: Multicolored
 
Robin was a twelve-year-old Shih Tzu. All she had known her whole life was the elderly woman who cared for her. When the woman grew ill and couldn’t care for her anymore, Robin ended up in a shelter, alone and scared. The woman who came into the shelter looking for a companion was also lonely and afraid. Robin was the perfect fit and they bonded immediately. Robin will now spend the rest of her days loved and cared for, never again alone.
 
While Robin’s owner had trained her, many pet owners are uneducated in basic obedience training. Their lack of knowledge frequently results in behavioral problems, with the fault attributed to the animal rather than its owner. 
 
In a survey of nearly 4,000 owners who had given up their pets, only six percent had formal obedience training. More than half of them believed their pets had misbehaved out of spite, and one third mistakenly believed rubbing the animal’s nose in its messes would help house train the pet.
 
For first-time animal owners, education is the key to a happy relationship with their pet. Shelter workers, veterinarians, kennel clubs, and professional trainers are all good resources to help ensure a warm and loving bond between pet and owner.