#4803 – 2013 First-Class Forever Stamp - Black Heritage: Althea Gibson

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$1.90FREE with 520 points!
$1.90
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$0.50
$0.50
7 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM644 215x46mm 15 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1 business day. i
$7.75
$7.75
- MM646215x49mm 15 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1 business day. i
$7.75
$7.75
- MM62232x47mm 50 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1 business day. i
$4.75
$4.75
- MM420932x47mm 50 Vertical Clear Bottom-Weld Mounts
Ships in 1 business day. i
$4.75
$4.75

U.S. # 4803
2013 46¢ Althea Gibson

Black Heritage

 

Before she could compete on a tennis court, Althea Gibson had to defeat racism and segregation. She proved to be a formidable opponent, breaking the color barrier in professional tennis and earning recognition for herself as the “female Jackie Robinson.” 

 

Gibson (1927-2003) was born in the South but grew up in Harlem. Unhappy in school and often absent, Gibson first explored tennis by bouncing rubber balls off a brick wall until a one-armed coach taught her how to play. With the help of supporters including boxer Sugar Ray Robinson, she won her first tournament at age 15.

 

Gibson quickly rose through the ranks of the American Tennis Association, which was founded in 1916 for black players. She won the ATA singles tournament ten years in a row, but was banned from more prestigious events because of her race. Finally, white tennis star Alice Marble wrote an open letter in protest. Gibson was allowed to compete in the U.S. Nationals beginning in 1950. 

 

Perfecting an aggressive serve-and-volley style, Gibson made history by becoming the first black person to win a Wimbledon title, the French Open in both singles and doubles, the doubles title at the Australian Open, and the U.S. Open.

 

U.S. #4803 features an oil on wood painting by Kadir Nelson of Althea Gibson at Wimbledon. 

 

Value: 46¢ 1-ounce first-class letter rate

Issued:  August 23, 2013

First Day City:  Flushing, NY

Type of Stamp: Commemorative
Printed by:
Avery Dennison
Method: Photogravure printing in sheets of 200 in 10 panes of 20
Perforation: Serpentine Die Cut 11

Self-Adhesive
Quantity Printed: 40,000,000 stamps

The Althea Gibson stamp is the 36th issue in the Black Heritage series.  The longest-running U.S. commemorative series, Black Heritage began in 1978 with an issue honoring Harriet Tubman.   Click here for more on the Black Heritage series. 

Read More - Click Here


  • 2019 First-Class Forever Stamp - First Moon Landing NEW 2019 Moon Landing Stamps

    Commemorates the 50th anniversary of man’s first footstep on the moon’s surface by Neil Armstrong, Commander of the Apollo 11 mission.  First-ever US stamps to be printed on chrome paper!

    $2.25- $195.00
    BUY NOW
  • Mystic Mystery Mix Mystic's Famous Mystery Mix

    Build your collection quickly with this mixture of U.S. stamps, foreign stamps, and stamps on covers.  Hours of fun and excitement guaranteed!

    $49.95
    BUY NOW
  • 2018 Giant US Commemorative Collection, Mint, 132 Stamps 2018 US Commemorative Collection

    Get every 2018 US commemorative issued plus several bonus sheets, souvenir sheets, and panes – all at once in mint condition.

    $120.95
    BUY NOW

U.S. # 4803
2013 46¢ Althea Gibson

Black Heritage

 

Before she could compete on a tennis court, Althea Gibson had to defeat racism and segregation. She proved to be a formidable opponent, breaking the color barrier in professional tennis and earning recognition for herself as the “female Jackie Robinson.” 

 

Gibson (1927-2003) was born in the South but grew up in Harlem. Unhappy in school and often absent, Gibson first explored tennis by bouncing rubber balls off a brick wall until a one-armed coach taught her how to play. With the help of supporters including boxer Sugar Ray Robinson, she won her first tournament at age 15.

 

Gibson quickly rose through the ranks of the American Tennis Association, which was founded in 1916 for black players. She won the ATA singles tournament ten years in a row, but was banned from more prestigious events because of her race. Finally, white tennis star Alice Marble wrote an open letter in protest. Gibson was allowed to compete in the U.S. Nationals beginning in 1950. 

 

Perfecting an aggressive serve-and-volley style, Gibson made history by becoming the first black person to win a Wimbledon title, the French Open in both singles and doubles, the doubles title at the Australian Open, and the U.S. Open.

 

U.S. #4803 features an oil on wood painting by Kadir Nelson of Althea Gibson at Wimbledon. 

 

Value: 46¢ 1-ounce first-class letter rate

Issued:  August 23, 2013

First Day City:  Flushing, NY

Type of Stamp: Commemorative
Printed by:
Avery Dennison
Method: Photogravure printing in sheets of 200 in 10 panes of 20
Perforation: Serpentine Die Cut 11

Self-Adhesive
Quantity Printed: 40,000,000 stamps

The Althea Gibson stamp is the 36th issue in the Black Heritage series.  The longest-running U.S. commemorative series, Black Heritage began in 1978 with an issue honoring Harriet Tubman.   Click here for more on the Black Heritage series.