#563 – 1922 11c Hayes, blue perf 11

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. iFREE with 1,050 points!
$4.25
- Used Stamp(s)
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$0.45
- Unused Stamp (small flaws)
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$2.95
- Used Stamp (small flaws)
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$0.30
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Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Plate Block of 6
Ships in 30 days. i
$70.00
camera Mint Sheet(s)
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$470.00
camera Mint Stamp(s)
Fine
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$5.25
camera Mint Stamp(s)
Fine, Never Hinged
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$6.75
camera Mint Stamp(s)
Very Fine
Ships in 1 business day. i
$6.65
camera Mint Stamp(s)
Very Fine, Never Hinged
Ships in 1 business day. i
$8.25
Grading Guide

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Condition
Price
Qty
- MM63625 Horizontal Strip Mounts, Black, Split-back, 215 x 30 millimeters (8-7/16 x 1-3/16 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$7.50
- MM636 25 Horizontal Strip Mounts, Black, Split-back, 215 x 30 millimeters (8-7/16 x 1-3/16 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$7.50
- MM50350 Vertical Mounts, Black, Split-back, Pre-cut, 27 x 30 millimeters (1 x 1-3/16 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$2.95
- MM4200Mystic Clear Mount 27x30mm - 50 precut mounts
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$1.95
U.S. #563
Series of 1922-25 11¢ Hayes
Flat Plate Printing

Issue Date: October 4, 1922
First City: Fremont, OH and Washington, DC
Quantity Issued: 298,510,877
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Flat plate
Perforation: 11 gauge
Color: Blue
 
Rutherford B. Hayes, shown on U.S. #563, was the 19th U.S. President. This was the first stamp issued in honor of Hayes. It also is regarded as the first “First Day of Issue” ceremony. The stamp was issued on October 4th, 1922 – the 100th anniversary of Hayes’ birth. It was also issued in Fremont, Ohio, where Hayes was born.
 
To meet that schedule, the Bureau of Engraving and Printing had to rush to print the stamp. The die wasn’t finished until September 28, and the stamps went to press on September 30, the same day the first plate was approved. A limited number of stamps were in the first printing – less than a quarter of a million. A ceremony was held in Fremont in which the “first sheet” was sold to Scott Hayes, the son of the former President.

The Series of 1922-25
and the Wheels of Progress
 
In 1847, when the printing presses first began to move, they didn’t roll – they “stamped” in a process known as flat plate printing. The Regular Series of 1922 was the last to be printed by flat plate press, after which stamps were produced by rotary press printing.
 
By 1926, all denominations up to 10¢ – except the new ½¢ – were printed by rotary press. For a while, $1 to $5 issues were done on flat plate press due to smaller demand.
 
In 1922, the Post Office Department announced its decision to issue a new series of stamps to replace the Washington-Franklin series, which had been in use since 1908. Many criticized the change, believing it was being made to satisfy collectors rather than to fill an actual need. However, the similar designs and colors of the current stamps caused confusion, resulting in a substantial loss in revenue each year. In busy situations, postal clerks could not tell at a glance if the correct postage was being used.
 
Postal employees requested a variety of designs which could easily be distinguished from one another. Great care was taken to make sure the new designs could not be confused. Although the frames are similar, the vignettes (central designs) are distinctive. Prominent Americans, as well as scenes of national interest, were chosen as subjects for the new series.
 
In addition to issuing new designs, the Department developed a plan to first distribute a small number of each stamp on a particular date in a selected town which was of historical and geographical significance to the subject. The plan greatly increased interest and began a new trend of collecting stamps on covers or envelopes postmarked on the first day of issue.
 
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U.S. #563
Series of 1922-25 11¢ Hayes
Flat Plate Printing

Issue Date: October 4, 1922
First City: Fremont, OH and Washington, DC
Quantity Issued: 298,510,877
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Flat plate
Perforation: 11 gauge
Color: Blue
 
Rutherford B. Hayes, shown on U.S. #563, was the 19th U.S. President. This was the first stamp issued in honor of Hayes. It also is regarded as the first “First Day of Issue” ceremony. The stamp was issued on October 4th, 1922 – the 100th anniversary of Hayes’ birth. It was also issued in Fremont, Ohio, where Hayes was born.
 
To meet that schedule, the Bureau of Engraving and Printing had to rush to print the stamp. The die wasn’t finished until September 28, and the stamps went to press on September 30, the same day the first plate was approved. A limited number of stamps were in the first printing – less than a quarter of a million. A ceremony was held in Fremont in which the “first sheet” was sold to Scott Hayes, the son of the former President.

The Series of 1922-25
and the Wheels of Progress
 
In 1847, when the printing presses first began to move, they didn’t roll – they “stamped” in a process known as flat plate printing. The Regular Series of 1922 was the last to be printed by flat plate press, after which stamps were produced by rotary press printing.
 
By 1926, all denominations up to 10¢ – except the new ½¢ – were printed by rotary press. For a while, $1 to $5 issues were done on flat plate press due to smaller demand.
 
In 1922, the Post Office Department announced its decision to issue a new series of stamps to replace the Washington-Franklin series, which had been in use since 1908. Many criticized the change, believing it was being made to satisfy collectors rather than to fill an actual need. However, the similar designs and colors of the current stamps caused confusion, resulting in a substantial loss in revenue each year. In busy situations, postal clerks could not tell at a glance if the correct postage was being used.
 
Postal employees requested a variety of designs which could easily be distinguished from one another. Great care was taken to make sure the new designs could not be confused. Although the frames are similar, the vignettes (central designs) are distinctive. Prominent Americans, as well as scenes of national interest, were chosen as subjects for the new series.
 
In addition to issuing new designs, the Department developed a plan to first distribute a small number of each stamp on a particular date in a selected town which was of historical and geographical significance to the subject. The plan greatly increased interest and began a new trend of collecting stamps on covers or envelopes postmarked on the first day of issue.