#564 – 1923 12c Cleveland, perf 11

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U.S. #564
Series of 1922-25
12¢ Cleveland


Issue Date:
March 20, 1923
First City:  Boston, MA, Caldwell, NJ and Washington, DC
Issue Quantity: 447,511,777

Wheels of Progress

In 1847, when the printing presses first began to move, they didn’t roll – they “stamped” in a process known as flat plate printing.  The Regular Series of 1922 was the last to be printed by flat plate press, after which stamps were produced by rotary press printing.

 

By 1926, all denominations up to 10¢ – except the new ½¢ – were printed by rotary press.  For a while, $1 to $5 issues were done on flat plate press due to smaller demand.

 

Grover Cleveland (1837-1908)
22nd and 24th President

Grover Cleveland was the first Democrat elected to the White House after the Civil War.  He was the only president to serve two terms that were not consecutive.  Extremely honest and hardworking, Cleveland earned a reputation for saying “no” to special interests.  In fact, he used his veto power more times than all previous presidents combined.  He remains the only president to have been married in the White House.  His final words were, “I have tried so hard to do right.”

Cleveland was born in Caldwell, New Jersey, on March 18, 1837.  Later, he moved to upstate New York, where he attended school until the age of 14.  Cleveland was only 16 when his father died.  At the age of 17, he began traveling west to find his fortune, intending to go to Cleveland, Ohio.  However, he settled in Buffalo, New York, where he found work with his mother’s uncle, and eventually decided to become a lawyer.  Cleveland was admitted to the bar in 1859.

He began his involvement with politics as a ward worker for the Democratic Party in Buffalo.  In 1870, he was elected sheriff, and in 1881 he became mayor.  Cleveland quickly became known for his honesty, and in 1882, he was chosen to run for governor of New York.  Cleveland won the election by a large margin.  When the Republican Party split over the nomination of a candidate involved in a financial scandal, the dissenting members, known as “Mugwumps,” said they would vote for a Democrat... as long as he was honest.  The Democrats nominated Cleveland for President of the United States in 1884.  Cleveland’s reputation played a large role in his victory.

Cleveland’s dedication to reform upset many groups who looked for the government to aid them.  These groups included farmers, laborers, veterans, and industrialists.  By the election of 1888, the tide of popularity had turned against him.  Neither Cleveland nor the Democratic party waged a strong campaign, and the Republican candidate, Benjamin Harrison, won the election.  However, by the end of Harrison’s term, the country was frustrated by high government expenditures and rising prices.  Again, the nation turned to the sensible moderation of Cleveland.  In 1892, Cleveland was re-elected.

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U.S. #564
Series of 1922-25
12¢ Cleveland


Issue Date:
March 20, 1923
First City:  Boston, MA, Caldwell, NJ and Washington, DC
Issue Quantity: 447,511,777

Wheels of Progress

In 1847, when the printing presses first began to move, they didn’t roll – they “stamped” in a process known as flat plate printing.  The Regular Series of 1922 was the last to be printed by flat plate press, after which stamps were produced by rotary press printing.

 

By 1926, all denominations up to 10¢ – except the new ½¢ – were printed by rotary press.  For a while, $1 to $5 issues were done on flat plate press due to smaller demand.

 

Grover Cleveland (1837-1908)
22nd and 24th President

Grover Cleveland was the first Democrat elected to the White House after the Civil War.  He was the only president to serve two terms that were not consecutive.  Extremely honest and hardworking, Cleveland earned a reputation for saying “no” to special interests.  In fact, he used his veto power more times than all previous presidents combined.  He remains the only president to have been married in the White House.  His final words were, “I have tried so hard to do right.”

Cleveland was born in Caldwell, New Jersey, on March 18, 1837.  Later, he moved to upstate New York, where he attended school until the age of 14.  Cleveland was only 16 when his father died.  At the age of 17, he began traveling west to find his fortune, intending to go to Cleveland, Ohio.  However, he settled in Buffalo, New York, where he found work with his mother’s uncle, and eventually decided to become a lawyer.  Cleveland was admitted to the bar in 1859.

He began his involvement with politics as a ward worker for the Democratic Party in Buffalo.  In 1870, he was elected sheriff, and in 1881 he became mayor.  Cleveland quickly became known for his honesty, and in 1882, he was chosen to run for governor of New York.  Cleveland won the election by a large margin.  When the Republican Party split over the nomination of a candidate involved in a financial scandal, the dissenting members, known as “Mugwumps,” said they would vote for a Democrat... as long as he was honest.  The Democrats nominated Cleveland for President of the United States in 1884.  Cleveland’s reputation played a large role in his victory.

Cleveland’s dedication to reform upset many groups who looked for the government to aid them.  These groups included farmers, laborers, veterans, and industrialists.  By the election of 1888, the tide of popularity had turned against him.  Neither Cleveland nor the Democratic party waged a strong campaign, and the Republican candidate, Benjamin Harrison, won the election.  However, by the end of Harrison’s term, the country was frustrated by high government expenditures and rising prices.  Again, the nation turned to the sensible moderation of Cleveland.  In 1892, Cleveland was re-elected.