#572 – 1923 $2 Capitol, deep blue

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- Mint Stamp(s)
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$135.00
- Used Stamp(s)
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$9.00
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$89.00
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$5.50
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- MM634 25 Horizontal Strip Mounts, Black, Split-back, 215 x 27 millimeters (8-7/16 x 1-1/16 inches)
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- MM50450 Horizontal Mounts, Black, Split-back, Pre-cut, 30 x 27 millimeters (1-3/16 x 1 inch)
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U.S. #572 was first issued on March 20, 1923.  Small quantities were released each year for the next eleven years.  In total, only two million #572 stamps were issued over a twelve-year period.  That’s less than the quantity issued in one year for most other issues during that time.

This $2 Stamp Was Expensive to Acquire in 1923

Two dollars was worth a great deal more in 1923.  Consider this: when adjusted for inflation, $2 in 1923 would be worth about $87.00 in wages today!  Obviously, many stamp collectors were unable to invest in such an expensive stamp.

New 1922 Series Subject of Widespread Newspaper Publicity

In 1922, the Post Office Department announced it was considering a new series of stamps to replace the then-current Washington/Franklin stamps, which had been in use with relatively few changes since 1908.  Naturally the news resulted in widespread newspaper publicity.  And while some papers, such as the Cleveland Plain Dealer, were in favor of the new series, many papers criticized the change, stating the new stamps were only being produced to satisfy collectors.

Postmaster General W. Irving Glover denied the statements.  Rather he attributed the change to the thousands of letters he had received from postal employees requesting the production of new stamps with distinct variations in designs and colors.  Due to the striking similarity of the current stamps, thousands of dollars in revenue were being lost each year. 

A Symbol of Our American Heritage

The $2 U.S. Capitol stamp was part of the new series.  In addition to creating distinctly different stamps, the Post Office also worked to produce stamps which were interesting and attractive.  The new stamps featured many prominent Americans, along with scenes of national interest.  Originally slated to be used on the 50¢ stamp, the Capitol building was eventually chosen as the design on the $2 stamp.

A symbol of our American heritage, the Capitol building has been the scene of many pivotal events in American history.  Since its completion in 1795, the Capitol has been the powerhouse of our government.  Even today, the House of Representatives and the Senate meet here to make the decisions that continue to affect our lives. 

The Capitol’s 540 rooms hold mementos of U.S. history as well as paintings and statues by world-famous artists.  The building also houses the old Supreme Court chamber where the court met from 1810-1860, and the famous Statuary Hall.

 

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U.S. #572 was first issued on March 20, 1923.  Small quantities were released each year for the next eleven years.  In total, only two million #572 stamps were issued over a twelve-year period.  That’s less than the quantity issued in one year for most other issues during that time.

This $2 Stamp Was Expensive to Acquire in 1923

Two dollars was worth a great deal more in 1923.  Consider this: when adjusted for inflation, $2 in 1923 would be worth about $87.00 in wages today!  Obviously, many stamp collectors were unable to invest in such an expensive stamp.

New 1922 Series Subject of Widespread Newspaper Publicity

In 1922, the Post Office Department announced it was considering a new series of stamps to replace the then-current Washington/Franklin stamps, which had been in use with relatively few changes since 1908.  Naturally the news resulted in widespread newspaper publicity.  And while some papers, such as the Cleveland Plain Dealer, were in favor of the new series, many papers criticized the change, stating the new stamps were only being produced to satisfy collectors.

Postmaster General W. Irving Glover denied the statements.  Rather he attributed the change to the thousands of letters he had received from postal employees requesting the production of new stamps with distinct variations in designs and colors.  Due to the striking similarity of the current stamps, thousands of dollars in revenue were being lost each year. 

A Symbol of Our American Heritage

The $2 U.S. Capitol stamp was part of the new series.  In addition to creating distinctly different stamps, the Post Office also worked to produce stamps which were interesting and attractive.  The new stamps featured many prominent Americans, along with scenes of national interest.  Originally slated to be used on the 50¢ stamp, the Capitol building was eventually chosen as the design on the $2 stamp.

A symbol of our American heritage, the Capitol building has been the scene of many pivotal events in American history.  Since its completion in 1795, the Capitol has been the powerhouse of our government.  Even today, the House of Representatives and the Senate meet here to make the decisions that continue to affect our lives. 

The Capitol’s 540 rooms hold mementos of U.S. history as well as paintings and statues by world-famous artists.  The building also houses the old Supreme Court chamber where the court met from 1810-1860, and the famous Statuary Hall.