#602 – 1924 5c Theodore Roosevelt, dark blue

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U.S. #602
Series of 1923-26 5¢ Theodore Roosevelt

Issue Date: March 5, 1924
First City: Washington, D.C.
Quantity Issued: Unknown
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforation: 10 Vertically
Color: Dark Blue
 
The 5¢ Series of 1923-26 stamp pictures Theodore Roosevelt. No release date for U.S. #602 was announced – similar to most of the coil stamps in the Series of 1923-26. But alert collectors were able to secure First Day Covers. The 5¢ rate paid for letters to foreign countries, where Roosevelt was still popular.
 
Teddy Roosevelt Suffers Family Tragedy at Age 25 
 
Theodore Roosevelt was a young, promising politician in New York State when his wife, Alice, died of kidney failure two days after the birth of their daughter. The tragedy was even greater as his mother, Mittie, died of typhoid fever in the same house earlier in the same day. The 25-year-old Roosevelt withdrew from public life and moved to the North Dakota Territory. 
 
Roosevelt built a ranch in the Dakota Badlands and over the next two years slowly recovered in the solitude of the wild. Once, acting as a deputy sheriff, he tracked and captured three outlaws and brought them back for trial. He stayed awake for the entire 40-hour trip, keeping himself awake by reading. After his cattle herd was wiped out in the harsh winter of 1886-87, Roosevelt returned to his home in Oyster Bay, New York. Of his time spent in the Dakota Territory, he said, “I have always said I would not have been President had it not been for my experience in North Dakota.”
 
 
 
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U.S. #602
Series of 1923-26 5¢ Theodore Roosevelt

Issue Date: March 5, 1924
First City: Washington, D.C.
Quantity Issued: Unknown
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforation: 10 Vertically
Color: Dark Blue
 
The 5¢ Series of 1923-26 stamp pictures Theodore Roosevelt. No release date for U.S. #602 was announced – similar to most of the coil stamps in the Series of 1923-26. But alert collectors were able to secure First Day Covers. The 5¢ rate paid for letters to foreign countries, where Roosevelt was still popular.
 
Teddy Roosevelt Suffers Family Tragedy at Age 25 
 
Theodore Roosevelt was a young, promising politician in New York State when his wife, Alice, died of kidney failure two days after the birth of their daughter. The tragedy was even greater as his mother, Mittie, died of typhoid fever in the same house earlier in the same day. The 25-year-old Roosevelt withdrew from public life and moved to the North Dakota Territory. 
 
Roosevelt built a ranch in the Dakota Badlands and over the next two years slowly recovered in the solitude of the wild. Once, acting as a deputy sheriff, he tracked and captured three outlaws and brought them back for trial. He stayed awake for the entire 40-hour trip, keeping himself awake by reading. After his cattle herd was wiped out in the harsh winter of 1886-87, Roosevelt returned to his home in Oyster Bay, New York. Of his time spent in the Dakota Territory, he said, “I have always said I would not have been President had it not been for my experience in North Dakota.”