#639 – 1927 7c McKinley,black

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$5.50
- Used Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$0.20
- Unused Stamp (small flaws)
Ships in 1 business day. iFREE with 830 points!
$3.75
- Used Stamp (small flaws)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$0.15
6 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM750Mystic Black Mount Size 27/31 (50)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$2.95
- MM4200Mystic Clear Mount 27x30mm - 50 precut mounts
Ships in 1 business day. i
$1.95
U.S. #639
1926-28 Rotary Stamps
7¢ William McKinley
 
First Day of Issue: March 24, 1927
First City: Washington, D.C.
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforation: 11 x 10 ½
Color: Black
 
The portrait of William McKinley on U.S. #639 is based on a photograph by New York photographer George Rockwood. The image of the 25th president became his official portrait for use at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing.
 
Perfecting Perforations on Rotary Stamps
When the Bureau began printing sheets on the rotary press, they found 11 gauge perforations were too fine, causing the stamps to separate prematurely. This resulted in the perforations being changed back to 10 gauge perforations, which had first been used in 1915. Once again, objections were raised, and the Bureau began looking for a way to perforate the stamps so they were strong enough to resist premature separation, yet fine enough to be separated without difficulty. The solution was found in a compromise that resulted in a new perforation – the 10 1/2 gauge.
 
This perforation seemed to please everyone and was adopted as the new standard for rotary press sheets. In the words of Linn’s author Gary Griffith, the 1926-28 Compound Perforation rotary stamps represent “if not perfection, then at least a high degree of achievement...”
 
William McKinley
Prior to taking the nation’s highest office, William McKinley served as Governor of Ohio and introduced the McKinley Tariff of 1890, which set a specific rate for U.S. imports. While this provided protection to manufacturing workers, it drove up the prices of farm equipment for farmers. 
 
In 1896, McKinley became the last Civil War veteran to be elected President, as well as the last president to serve in the 19th century and the first to serve in the 20th century. His term was one of prosperity following the disastrous Panic of 1893, establishing gold as the basis of American currency. His demands that Spain end its violence in Cuba led to the Spanish-American War, which America won in under four months. As a result, the U.S. acquired the Philippines, Puerto Rico, and Guam. McKinley later allowed the Republic of Hawaii to join the U.S., making its residents American citizens.
 
McKinley was re-elected in 190,0 but was assassinated by anarchist Leon Czolgosz in 1901.
Read More - Click Here

  • U.S. Album with 100 postally used stamps, 1,000 hinges, and a free stamp collecting guide U.S. Stamp Starter Kit

    This is a great album to start with because it pictures U.S stamps that are easy to find and buy. Pages illustrated on one side only, high quality paper, every stamp identified with Scott numbers. Includes history of each stamp. Affordable - same design as Mystic's American Heirloom album.

    $14.95
    BUY NOW
  • 3-Volume American Heirloom Album and 200 Used US Stamps 3-Volume American Heirloom Album

    America's best-selling album. Pictures most every U.S. postage stamp issued 1847-2016, over 5,000 stamps with Scott numbers. Pages filled with stamp history. This album is a great value!

    $49.95
    BUY NOW
  • Mystic Premium Hingeless American Heirloom Album Volume I, 1847-1934 Premium Hingeless American Heirloom Album

    Similar to standard American Heirloom album but includes mounts that are already attached to pages, saving you time and effort. Sturdier pages than American Heirloom. Includes Scott numbers and stamp history. This volume is for stamps issued 1935-1966, over 600 stamps. Higher quality album than Heirloom.

    $99.95
    BUY NOW

U.S. #639
1926-28 Rotary Stamps
7¢ William McKinley
 
First Day of Issue: March 24, 1927
First City: Washington, D.C.
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforation: 11 x 10 ½
Color: Black
 
The portrait of William McKinley on U.S. #639 is based on a photograph by New York photographer George Rockwood. The image of the 25th president became his official portrait for use at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing.
 
Perfecting Perforations on Rotary Stamps
When the Bureau began printing sheets on the rotary press, they found 11 gauge perforations were too fine, causing the stamps to separate prematurely. This resulted in the perforations being changed back to 10 gauge perforations, which had first been used in 1915. Once again, objections were raised, and the Bureau began looking for a way to perforate the stamps so they were strong enough to resist premature separation, yet fine enough to be separated without difficulty. The solution was found in a compromise that resulted in a new perforation – the 10 1/2 gauge.
 
This perforation seemed to please everyone and was adopted as the new standard for rotary press sheets. In the words of Linn’s author Gary Griffith, the 1926-28 Compound Perforation rotary stamps represent “if not perfection, then at least a high degree of achievement...”
 
William McKinley
Prior to taking the nation’s highest office, William McKinley served as Governor of Ohio and introduced the McKinley Tariff of 1890, which set a specific rate for U.S. imports. While this provided protection to manufacturing workers, it drove up the prices of farm equipment for farmers. 
 
In 1896, McKinley became the last Civil War veteran to be elected President, as well as the last president to serve in the 19th century and the first to serve in the 20th century. His term was one of prosperity following the disastrous Panic of 1893, establishing gold as the basis of American currency. His demands that Spain end its violence in Cuba led to the Spanish-American War, which America won in under four months. As a result, the U.S. acquired the Philippines, Puerto Rico, and Guam. McKinley later allowed the Republic of Hawaii to join the U.S., making its residents American citizens.
 
McKinley was re-elected in 190,0 but was assassinated by anarchist Leon Czolgosz in 1901.