#C150 – 2012 $1.05 Lancaster County, PA

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U.S. #C150

2012 $1.05 Lancaster County, PA

Scenic American Landscapes

 

Issue Date: January 20, 2012

City: Lancaster, PA

Quantity: 60,000,000

Printed By: Banknote Corporation of America for Sennett Security Products  

Printing Method: Offset

Color: multicolored

 

 

Lancaster County, the center of “Pennsylvania Dutch Country,” a popular tourist destination, is known as the “Garden Spot of America.” 

 

Settled in 1710, the county was named after the English city of Lancaster, home of settler John Wright.  One of the county’s most famous sons, James Buchanan, was the only President from Pennsylvania.  Another notable native, Robert Fulton, invented the first commercially successful steamboat.

 

Lancaster County is the home of several firsts.  These include the first battery-powered watch, the Hershey Company (one of the first chocolate factories in the U.S.), Woolworth’s Department Store, the Pennsylvania long rifle, the Conestoga wagon, and the stogie cigar.

 

Among the area’s protected lands are the serpentine barrens, a rare ecosystem in which toxic metals in the ground lead to the growth of various grasslands.  Pennsylvania Dutch Country is home to an Amish community that maintains a traditional, pre-industrial lifestyle.  Visitors are often delighted to share the road with horse-drawn buggies and bring home Amish quilts, high-quality wood furniture, and homemade baked goods (made, of course, without electricity).

Pennsylvania has the most covered bridges in the world – about 200.  Lancaster County has the most in the state – nearly 30 – making them another popular attraction.

 

Start Of Scenic American Landscapes Series

On May 12, 1999, the USPS introduced a new series of Airmail stamps – the Scenic American Landscapes.

These stamps are part of the Airmail series. Airmail as its own separate service came to an end in 1977. After that time, airmail stamps were issued to pay international rates. After 1995, the USPS called these “international-rate stamps,” though they still said “Airmail” on them.

Then on May 12, 1999, the USPS began a new series of Airmail stamps that would picture the “mountains, canyons, and swamps that comprise our country’s diverse and majestic terrain.” However, unlike previous issues, these stamps wouldn’t include the word “Airmail,” rather, they had a small silhouette of a jet next to the denomination. Like the stamps before them, these new issues paid the international rate. But they could also be used to pay for other postal services and make up other rates. New stamps would be issued as the rates changed. There were also postal stationary items including postal cards and aerogrammes.

There was a bit of controversy surrounding the third stamp in the series – the 2000 60¢ Grand Canyon issue. When it was first produced, it incorrectly read “Grand Canyon, Colorado.” Once they realized the mistake, the USPS ordered all stamps to be returned and destroyed (about 100 million), though some may have been sold and used on mail. Once the stamp was reissued with the correct state, it was discovered that the photo had been reversed, but the USPS chose not to reprint it again.

The final stamp in the series was issued on January 20, 2012, and pictured Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. A year later the USPS issued its first Global-rate Forever stamp (U.S. #4740) that would pay the one-ounce letter rate to Canada, Mexico, and the rest of the world.

Click the images below to learn about the rest of the stamps in the series.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
   
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U.S. #C150

2012 $1.05 Lancaster County, PA

Scenic American Landscapes

 

Issue Date: January 20, 2012

City: Lancaster, PA

Quantity: 60,000,000

Printed By: Banknote Corporation of America for Sennett Security Products

 

Printing Method: Offset

Color: multicolored

 

 

Lancaster County, the center of “Pennsylvania Dutch Country,” a popular tourist destination, is known as the “Garden Spot of America.” 

 

Settled in 1710, the county was named after the English city of Lancaster, home of settler John Wright.  One of the county’s most famous sons, James Buchanan, was the only President from Pennsylvania.  Another notable native, Robert Fulton, invented the first commercially successful steamboat.

 

Lancaster County is the home of several firsts.  These include the first battery-powered watch, the Hershey Company (one of the first chocolate factories in the U.S.), Woolworth’s Department Store, the Pennsylvania long rifle, the Conestoga wagon, and the stogie cigar.

 

Among the area’s protected lands are the serpentine barrens, a rare ecosystem in which toxic metals in the ground lead to the growth of various grasslands.  Pennsylvania Dutch Country is home to an Amish community that maintains a traditional, pre-industrial lifestyle.  Visitors are often delighted to share the road with horse-drawn buggies and bring home Amish quilts, high-quality wood furniture, and homemade baked goods (made, of course, without electricity).

Pennsylvania has the most covered bridges in the world – about 200.  Lancaster County has the most in the state – nearly 30 – making them another popular attraction.

 

Start Of Scenic American Landscapes Series

On May 12, 1999, the USPS introduced a new series of Airmail stamps – the Scenic American Landscapes.

These stamps are part of the Airmail series. Airmail as its own separate service came to an end in 1977. After that time, airmail stamps were issued to pay international rates. After 1995, the USPS called these “international-rate stamps,” though they still said “Airmail” on them.

Then on May 12, 1999, the USPS began a new series of Airmail stamps that would picture the “mountains, canyons, and swamps that comprise our country’s diverse and majestic terrain.” However, unlike previous issues, these stamps wouldn’t include the word “Airmail,” rather, they had a small silhouette of a jet next to the denomination. Like the stamps before them, these new issues paid the international rate. But they could also be used to pay for other postal services and make up other rates. New stamps would be issued as the rates changed. There were also postal stationary items including postal cards and aerogrammes.

There was a bit of controversy surrounding the third stamp in the series – the 2000 60¢ Grand Canyon issue. When it was first produced, it incorrectly read “Grand Canyon, Colorado.” Once they realized the mistake, the USPS ordered all stamps to be returned and destroyed (about 100 million), though some may have been sold and used on mail. Once the stamp was reissued with the correct state, it was discovered that the photo had been reversed, but the USPS chose not to reprint it again.

The final stamp in the series was issued on January 20, 2012, and pictured Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. A year later the USPS issued its first Global-rate Forever stamp (U.S. #4740) that would pay the one-ounce letter rate to Canada, Mexico, and the rest of the world.

Click the images below to learn about the rest of the stamps in the series.