#MDS296C – 1996 Disney's Tribute to Best Friends, Mint Souvenir Sheet, Ghana

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Mint Stamp Tribute to Best Friends:
Winnie the Pooh and Christopher Robin

Issued in 1996, this fun Ghana souvenir sheet pays tribute to one of Disney's greatest friendships, Winnie the Pooh and Christopher Robin.

The inspiration for Winnie the Pooh came from author A. A. Milne’s son, Christopher Robin Milne.  Christopher Robin had a toy bear he’d named Winnie the Pooh after an American black bear he saw at the London Zoo.  Winnie was purchased from a hunter by Canadian Lieutenant Harry Coleburn, who named her “Winnie” after his hometown of Winnipeg, Manitoba.  “Pooh” was a swan that Christopher Robin had met while on a vacation. 

The setting of the stories was based on Sussex, England’s Ashdown Forest, and the Hundred Acre Wood was based on Five Hundred Acre Wood.  Illustrations featured in Milne’s books, drawn by E. H. Shepard, perfectly capture the forest and many of its sights. 

Milne published the first collection of Winnie the Pooh stories in 1926.  Four years later, Stephen Slesinger purchased the rights to the stories and for more than 30 years produced Winne the Pooh dolls, records, board games, puzzles, a U.S. radio broadcast, animated features, and a motion picture.  Disney purchased the rights to the characters in 1961, creating the Winnie the Pooh that we know and love today. 
 

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Mint Stamp Tribute to Best Friends:
Winnie the Pooh and Christopher Robin

Issued in 1996, this fun Ghana souvenir sheet pays tribute to one of Disney's greatest friendships, Winnie the Pooh and Christopher Robin.

The inspiration for Winnie the Pooh came from author A. A. Milne’s son, Christopher Robin Milne.  Christopher Robin had a toy bear he’d named Winnie the Pooh after an American black bear he saw at the London Zoo.  Winnie was purchased from a hunter by Canadian Lieutenant Harry Coleburn, who named her “Winnie” after his hometown of Winnipeg, Manitoba.  “Pooh” was a swan that Christopher Robin had met while on a vacation. 

The setting of the stories was based on Sussex, England’s Ashdown Forest, and the Hundred Acre Wood was based on Five Hundred Acre Wood.  Illustrations featured in Milne’s books, drawn by E. H. Shepard, perfectly capture the forest and many of its sights. 

Milne published the first collection of Winnie the Pooh stories in 1926.  Four years later, Stephen Slesinger purchased the rights to the stories and for more than 30 years produced Winne the Pooh dolls, records, board games, puzzles, a U.S. radio broadcast, animated features, and a motion picture.  Disney purchased the rights to the characters in 1961, creating the Winnie the Pooh that we know and love today.