1952 $300 Distilled Spirits Excise Tax Stamp,yellow green & black

# RX39 - 1952 $300 Distilled Spirits Excise Tax Stamp - yellow green & black

$8.95 - $50.00
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US Revenue Stamps

Distilled Spirits Stamps

Two categories of US revenue stamps for distilled spirits were issued between 1946 and 1952.  They are the stamps for collection of the federal excise tax on distilled spirits and the stamps for the collection of the federal tax on the rectification, or the re-distillation, of condensed distilled spirits.  With  dimensions of 90 mm. x 64 mm., these two groups of revenue stamps are among the largest US stamps ever produced.

From the earliest history of the United States, liquor has been one of the most popular consumer products in our country.  The US Government tried to ban liquor during the early part of the 20th Century, but that didn't work out very well.  Liquor manufacturing and sales have been extensively taxed more than any other consumer product, and it has become a tremendous source of revenue by the federal government, state governments, and some local governments.

 

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US Revenue Stamps

Distilled Spirits Stamps

Two categories of US revenue stamps for distilled spirits were issued between 1946 and 1952.  They are the stamps for collection of the federal excise tax on distilled spirits and the stamps for the collection of the federal tax on the rectification, or the re-distillation, of condensed distilled spirits.  With  dimensions of 90 mm. x 64 mm., these two groups of revenue stamps are among the largest US stamps ever produced.

From the earliest history of the United States, liquor has been one of the most popular consumer products in our country.  The US Government tried to ban liquor during the early part of the 20th Century, but that didn't work out very well.  Liquor manufacturing and sales have been extensively taxed more than any other consumer product, and it has become a tremendous source of revenue by the federal government, state governments, and some local governments.