1857-61 1c Franklin, perf 15

# 19 - 1857-61 1c Franklin, perf 15

$6,295.00 - $27,500.00
Image Condition Price Qty
872725
Cover Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 7,500.00
$ 7,500.00
0
308332
Mint Stamp(s) Usually ships within 90 days. Usually ships within 90 days.
$ 17,500.00
$ 17,500.00
1
308333
Used Single Stamp(s) Usually ships within 90 days. Usually ships within 90 days.
$ 10,000.00
$ 10,000.00
2
No Image
Used Stamp(s) small flaws Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 6,295.00
$ 6,295.00
3
279008
Mint Plate or Cylinder Flaw Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 27,500.00
$ 27,500.00
4
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Mount Price Qty

One of America’s First-Ever Perforated Stamps… US #19

Enhance your serious US collection with America’s first perforated stamps – #19 is a great place to start.  I’m pleased (and extremely lucky) to have a tiny quantity of these rare 167-year-old stamps to offer you.  This stamp becomes scarcer and harder to find with each passing year, so now’s the time to get yours while it’s still available.    

 

Only 300,000 Issued

That’s right, only an estimated 300,000 were issued, a tiny fraction of today’s huge production numbers.  With the ravages of time, who knows how many remain for us collectors?  We’re fortunate to currently have any of this rare old stamp.  And now you can be one of the few lucky collectors able to own and preserve the seldom-seen stamp for future generations.  Mystic’s convenient no-interest time payments makes it easy to own the stamps you want. 

 

Share in This Historic Philatelic First…  

If you’re like me, you love important stamp firsts.  The introduction of perforated US stamps in 1857 was that and more.  It was an important part of the evolution in American stamp production.   

 

Perforations allowed postal clerks to easily separate stamps without cutting them apart or tearing them along the edge of a ruler.  Another big advantage – from that time on, stamps would adhere better to letters and packages.  And for us collectors it would become a great benefit, as it meant less damage to fragile stamps. 

       

Choose Your #19

Today you have a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to own the unique #19 plate flaw stamp in mint condition.  The “curl on shoulder” variety – position 97l4 – is extremely rare and its plate flaw greatly increases the stamps value.  (The flaw is a small wavy line appearing at far left on Franklin’s collar, almost touching the frameline.)  The stamp has a proof-like appearance with deep, rich color and two wide margins.  It’s a beautiful stamp you’ll be thrilled to have in your collection.   

 

Or you can choose the used single with small imperfections.  These tiny flaws don’t detract from the stamp’s beauty or collectability but do save you $3700.00 off Mystic’s regular price!)   

 

To get even more history into your collection of mid-19th century US stamps, choose #19 on cover.   In addition to the 1c value, the cover is franked with a 3c Washington stamp of the same issue.  It was sent from Mexico to Chicago, with both stamps cancelled and postage fees paid in the US on April 5th, 1858.  The cover even includes a Spanish-language circular.  It comes with a letter from Stanley Ashbrook and a 2005 Philatelic Foundation certificate.  A couple of tiny flaws on the #19 don’t detract from the desirability of this cover.  Truly an outstanding piece of American postal history!  

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One of America’s First-Ever Perforated Stamps… US #19

Enhance your serious US collection with America’s first perforated stamps – #19 is a great place to start.  I’m pleased (and extremely lucky) to have a tiny quantity of these rare 167-year-old stamps to offer you.  This stamp becomes scarcer and harder to find with each passing year, so now’s the time to get yours while it’s still available.    

 

Only 300,000 Issued

That’s right, only an estimated 300,000 were issued, a tiny fraction of today’s huge production numbers.  With the ravages of time, who knows how many remain for us collectors?  We’re fortunate to currently have any of this rare old stamp.  And now you can be one of the few lucky collectors able to own and preserve the seldom-seen stamp for future generations.  Mystic’s convenient no-interest time payments makes it easy to own the stamps you want. 

 

Share in This Historic Philatelic First…  

If you’re like me, you love important stamp firsts.  The introduction of perforated US stamps in 1857 was that and more.  It was an important part of the evolution in American stamp production.   

 

Perforations allowed postal clerks to easily separate stamps without cutting them apart or tearing them along the edge of a ruler.  Another big advantage – from that time on, stamps would adhere better to letters and packages.  And for us collectors it would become a great benefit, as it meant less damage to fragile stamps. 

       

Choose Your #19

Today you have a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to own the unique #19 plate flaw stamp in mint condition.  The “curl on shoulder” variety – position 97l4 – is extremely rare and its plate flaw greatly increases the stamps value.  (The flaw is a small wavy line appearing at far left on Franklin’s collar, almost touching the frameline.)  The stamp has a proof-like appearance with deep, rich color and two wide margins.  It’s a beautiful stamp you’ll be thrilled to have in your collection.   

 

Or you can choose the used single with small imperfections.  These tiny flaws don’t detract from the stamp’s beauty or collectability but do save you $3700.00 off Mystic’s regular price!)   

 

To get even more history into your collection of mid-19th century US stamps, choose #19 on cover.   In addition to the 1c value, the cover is franked with a 3c Washington stamp of the same issue.  It was sent from Mexico to Chicago, with both stamps cancelled and postage fees paid in the US on April 5th, 1858.  The cover even includes a Spanish-language circular.  It comes with a letter from Stanley Ashbrook and a 2005 Philatelic Foundation certificate.  A couple of tiny flaws on the #19 don’t detract from the desirability of this cover.  Truly an outstanding piece of American postal history!