1982 20c U.S. and Netherlands Relations

# 2003 - 1982 20c U.S. and Netherlands Relations

$0.35 - $50.00
(No reviews yet) Write a Review
Image Condition Price Qty
309216
Fleetwood First Day Cover Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days. Free with 420 Points
$ 2.95
$ 2.95
0
309217
Fleetwood First Day Cover (Plate Block) Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 3.75
$ 3.75
1
309218
Colorano Silk First Day Cover Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 2.25
$ 2.25
2
309215
Classic First Day Cover Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 1.75
$ 1.75
3
309220
Mint Plate Block Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 25.00
$ 25.00
4
309219
Mint Stamp(s) Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days. Free with 290 Points
$ 1.00
$ 1.00
5
309221
Mint Sheet(s) Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 50.00
$ 50.00
6
309222
Used Single Stamp(s) Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 0.35
$ 0.35
7
Show More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Mount Price Qty

U.S. #2003
1982 20¢ US and Netherlands Relations

  • Commemorates 200th anniversary of diplomatic relations between the US and Netherlands
  • 1st joint issue with the Netherlands, 9th overall
  • Design inspired by red, white and blue-striped flags of both countries

Stamp Category:  Commemorative
Value: 
20¢, first-class rate
First Day of Issue: 
April 20, 1982
First Day City: 
Washington, DC
Quantity Issued: 
109,245,000
Printed by: 
Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: 
Photogravure
Format: 
Panes of 50 in sheets of 200
Perforations:  11
Joint Issue: 
Netherlands 640-41

 

Why the stamp was issued:  This stamp was issued to commemorate the 200th anniversary of peaceful relations between the United States and Netherlands. Today, this continues to be the longest period of peace between the United States and any other foreign power.

 

About the stamp design:  Netherlands artist Heleen Tigler Wybrandi-Raue of Studio Dumber designed the US stamp as well as the two Netherlands joint-issue stamps.  They all feature the same red, white, and blue design.  The two Netherlands stamps have different denominations – when used together, they covered the airmail rate the US.  The design is inspired by the flags of both countries, which contain each contain red, white, and blue stripes.  The flag of the Netherlands was previously featured on a US stamp – #913 – as part of the World War II Overrun Countries Series.

 

First Day City:  The First Day ceremony for these joint issue stamps was held at the Meridian House International in Washington, DC.  The Netherlands’ Queen Beatrix attended the ceremony and participated in the dedication of the two Netherlands stamps.  This marked Beatrix’s first visit to the US as queen.

 

Unusual fact about this stamp:  Imperforate error stamps have been found.

 

History the stamp represents:  On April 19, 1782, John Adams secured recognition from the Dutch Republic of the United States as an independent government. This marked the start of one of America’s longest unbroken peaceful relationships with another nation.

 

The link between the Netherlands and America began more than a century earlier. In the late 1500s, the Dutch were among several Europeans to colonize the eastern coast of North America.

 

These early Dutch settlements comprised the territory of New Netherland, which became a colony of the Dutch Republic in 1624. The Dutch also established New Amsterdam, which later became New York City. And today, the flag of New York City is based on that of the Prince’s Flag (referring to Prince William of Orange) of the Republic of the United Netherlands.

 

On November 16, 1776, the Dutch fort at St. Eustatius fired its guns nine times as a ship flying the US flag sailed into the harbor. This was the first time another country gave America a formal salute, in effect recognizing the nation’s independence.

 

In July 1780, John Adams was made ambassador to the Dutch Republic. In this role, he traveled to the Netherlands and on April 19, 1782, was received by the States General in The Hague and recognized as Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States. This officially secured Dutch recognition of the United States as an independent government. The Netherlands was the second foreign country to recognize the US, after France, which had done so in 1778.

 

While in the Netherlands, Adams purchased a home in The Hague, which became the first American embassy in the world. Also during that trip, he negotiated a loan of five million guilders with two wealthy Dutch businessmen. By 1794, the Dutch would grant the US a total of 11 loans worth 29 million guilders. On September 6, 1782, Adams negotiated the Dutch-American Treaty of Amity and Commerce, the second such treaty with a foreign nation, again after France.

 

To mark the 200th anniversary of Adams’s first meeting with the Dutch, President Ronald Reagan declared April 19, 1982, to be Dutch-American Friendship Day, which is still celebrated today.

Read More - Click Here

U.S. #2003
1982 20¢ US and Netherlands Relations

  • Commemorates 200th anniversary of diplomatic relations between the US and Netherlands
  • 1st joint issue with the Netherlands, 9th overall
  • Design inspired by red, white and blue-striped flags of both countries

Stamp Category:  Commemorative
Value: 
20¢, first-class rate
First Day of Issue: 
April 20, 1982
First Day City: 
Washington, DC
Quantity Issued: 
109,245,000
Printed by: 
Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: 
Photogravure
Format: 
Panes of 50 in sheets of 200
Perforations:  11
Joint Issue: 
Netherlands 640-41

 

Why the stamp was issued:  This stamp was issued to commemorate the 200th anniversary of peaceful relations between the United States and Netherlands. Today, this continues to be the longest period of peace between the United States and any other foreign power.

 

About the stamp design:  Netherlands artist Heleen Tigler Wybrandi-Raue of Studio Dumber designed the US stamp as well as the two Netherlands joint-issue stamps.  They all feature the same red, white, and blue design.  The two Netherlands stamps have different denominations – when used together, they covered the airmail rate the US.  The design is inspired by the flags of both countries, which contain each contain red, white, and blue stripes.  The flag of the Netherlands was previously featured on a US stamp – #913 – as part of the World War II Overrun Countries Series.

 

First Day City:  The First Day ceremony for these joint issue stamps was held at the Meridian House International in Washington, DC.  The Netherlands’ Queen Beatrix attended the ceremony and participated in the dedication of the two Netherlands stamps.  This marked Beatrix’s first visit to the US as queen.

 

Unusual fact about this stamp:  Imperforate error stamps have been found.

 

History the stamp represents:  On April 19, 1782, John Adams secured recognition from the Dutch Republic of the United States as an independent government. This marked the start of one of America’s longest unbroken peaceful relationships with another nation.

 

The link between the Netherlands and America began more than a century earlier. In the late 1500s, the Dutch were among several Europeans to colonize the eastern coast of North America.

 

These early Dutch settlements comprised the territory of New Netherland, which became a colony of the Dutch Republic in 1624. The Dutch also established New Amsterdam, which later became New York City. And today, the flag of New York City is based on that of the Prince’s Flag (referring to Prince William of Orange) of the Republic of the United Netherlands.

 

On November 16, 1776, the Dutch fort at St. Eustatius fired its guns nine times as a ship flying the US flag sailed into the harbor. This was the first time another country gave America a formal salute, in effect recognizing the nation’s independence.

 

In July 1780, John Adams was made ambassador to the Dutch Republic. In this role, he traveled to the Netherlands and on April 19, 1782, was received by the States General in The Hague and recognized as Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States. This officially secured Dutch recognition of the United States as an independent government. The Netherlands was the second foreign country to recognize the US, after France, which had done so in 1778.

 

While in the Netherlands, Adams purchased a home in The Hague, which became the first American embassy in the world. Also during that trip, he negotiated a loan of five million guilders with two wealthy Dutch businessmen. By 1794, the Dutch would grant the US a total of 11 loans worth 29 million guilders. On September 6, 1782, Adams negotiated the Dutch-American Treaty of Amity and Commerce, the second such treaty with a foreign nation, again after France.

 

To mark the 200th anniversary of Adams’s first meeting with the Dutch, President Ronald Reagan declared April 19, 1982, to be Dutch-American Friendship Day, which is still celebrated today.