1983 20c Physical Fitness

# 2043 - 1983 20c Physical Fitness

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309533
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U.S. #2043
1983 20¢ Physical Fitness

  • Issued as a tribute to Americans’ dedication to good physical health
  • Issued during Physical Fitness Month
  • Electrocardiograph has an error – a U wave indicating a health problem

Stamp Category:  Commemorative
Value: 
20¢, first-class rate
First Day of Issue: 
May 14, 1983
First Day City: 
Houston, Texas
Quantity Issued: 
111,775,000
Printed by: 
Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: 
Photogravure
Format: 
Panes of 50 in sheets of 230
Perforations:  11

Why the stamp was issued:  The USPS didn’t announce this stamp until about a week before it was issued.  Some suggested it may have been inspired by President Ronald Reagan’s designation of May as Physical Fitness month.  USPS bulletins for the stamp said it recognized “the increasing enthusiasm of Americans for attaining and maintaining good physical health.”

 

About the stamp design:  Donald Moss, who’d previously designed the 1976 Olympics stamps, selected three joggers to represent physical fitness for this stamp.  One female and two male joggers in proper running attire move left to right in front of a large green block, within which appears a white line representing an electrocardiograph.

 

Special design details:  A doctor taking a close look at the electrocardiograph on this stamp claims it has an error.  He pointed out that there is a “U” wave, indicating hypokalemia, or low potassium, which is a very serious medical concern. 

 

First Day City:  This stamp had a rare evening First Day ceremony, held after the National Fitness Classic at the Houston Convention Center in Houston, Texas. 

 

History the stamp represents:  Laughter really is good medicine.  Blood flow increases for up to 45 minutes after a hardy chuckle, so watching a comedy is a fun way to improve heart health.  Making small, simple lifestyle changes like this can reduce the risk of coronary heart disease, the leading cause of death in American adults.

 

Physical activity strengthens the heart and cardiovascular system plus helps maintain a healthy weight.  Walking is a form of exercise that is easy to do.  Taking a walk through a park is a pleasant way to reduce stress while burning calories.  Every hour of walking has been shown to increase life expectancy by two hours.

 

People who enjoy their exercise are more likely to stick with it.  Some choose gardening or ballroom dancing, while others take a bike ride.  Each activity leads to a healthier heart.

 

Eating a well-balanced diet can increase heart health by lowering cholesterol.  Farmers’ markets offer fresh, locally grown produce that adds taste, color, and nutrition to a menu.

 

Planning for exercise and healthy eating is essential to success in fighting heart disease.  Raising awareness of this disease and its prevention can lead to healthier hearts and longer lives.

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U.S. #2043
1983 20¢ Physical Fitness

  • Issued as a tribute to Americans’ dedication to good physical health
  • Issued during Physical Fitness Month
  • Electrocardiograph has an error – a U wave indicating a health problem

Stamp Category:  Commemorative
Value: 
20¢, first-class rate
First Day of Issue: 
May 14, 1983
First Day City: 
Houston, Texas
Quantity Issued: 
111,775,000
Printed by: 
Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: 
Photogravure
Format: 
Panes of 50 in sheets of 230
Perforations:  11

Why the stamp was issued:  The USPS didn’t announce this stamp until about a week before it was issued.  Some suggested it may have been inspired by President Ronald Reagan’s designation of May as Physical Fitness month.  USPS bulletins for the stamp said it recognized “the increasing enthusiasm of Americans for attaining and maintaining good physical health.”

 

About the stamp design:  Donald Moss, who’d previously designed the 1976 Olympics stamps, selected three joggers to represent physical fitness for this stamp.  One female and two male joggers in proper running attire move left to right in front of a large green block, within which appears a white line representing an electrocardiograph.

 

Special design details:  A doctor taking a close look at the electrocardiograph on this stamp claims it has an error.  He pointed out that there is a “U” wave, indicating hypokalemia, or low potassium, which is a very serious medical concern. 

 

First Day City:  This stamp had a rare evening First Day ceremony, held after the National Fitness Classic at the Houston Convention Center in Houston, Texas. 

 

History the stamp represents:  Laughter really is good medicine.  Blood flow increases for up to 45 minutes after a hardy chuckle, so watching a comedy is a fun way to improve heart health.  Making small, simple lifestyle changes like this can reduce the risk of coronary heart disease, the leading cause of death in American adults.

 

Physical activity strengthens the heart and cardiovascular system plus helps maintain a healthy weight.  Walking is a form of exercise that is easy to do.  Taking a walk through a park is a pleasant way to reduce stress while burning calories.  Every hour of walking has been shown to increase life expectancy by two hours.

 

People who enjoy their exercise are more likely to stick with it.  Some choose gardening or ballroom dancing, while others take a bike ride.  Each activity leads to a healthier heart.

 

Eating a well-balanced diet can increase heart health by lowering cholesterol.  Farmers’ markets offer fresh, locally grown produce that adds taste, color, and nutrition to a menu.

 

Planning for exercise and healthy eating is essential to success in fighting heart disease.  Raising awareness of this disease and its prevention can lead to healthier hearts and longer lives.