1985 22c Winter Special Olympics

# 2142 - 1985 22c Winter Special Olympics

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U.S. #2142
1985 22¢ Winter Special Olympics

  • First BEP-printed stamp with metallic ink
  • Honors the third Special Olympics World Winter Games

Stamp Category:  Commemorative
Value: 
22¢; first-class rate
First Day of Issue: 
March 25, 1985
First Day City: 
Park City, Utah
Quantity Issued: 
120,580,000
Printed by: 
Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: 
Photogravure
Format: 
Panes of 40 in sheets of 160
Perforations:  11

 

Why the stamp was issued:  To recognize the 1985 Winter Special Olympics.

 

About the stamp design:  Originally, the USPS planned to honor the Winter Special Olympics with a postal card.  The Special Olympics organization hadn’t pushed for a stamp, but once they learned the USPS was planning one, they offered suggestions on the design.  The stamp’s artwork was created by children’s book illustrator Jeff Cornell, who had also designed the 1979 Special Olympics stamp. The center of the stamp features the organization’s logo, with a female skater and make skier on either side.

 

About the printing process:  These were the first US stamps printed by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) with metallic ink.  In 1984, contract printers American Bank Note Company (ABNC) and J.W. Fergusson had printed two stamps with metallic ink.  However, their oil-based metallic ink didn’t take cancellations well.  So, the BEP experimented with a water-based metallic ink for this stamp.  The phosphor tagging ink was also water-based, which was another first.  The metallic blue ink was used for the stick figures in the circle at the center of the stamp.  It doesn’t have as much shine as the ABNC stamps, but it does have silver in it, with the BEP calling it a “metallic opaque ink.” 

 

First Day City:  The First Day ceremony for this stamp was held at the Yarrow Hotel in Park City, Utah, on the opening day of the 1985 Winter Special Olympic Games.  Among the attendees at the First Day ceremony were Eunice Kennedy Shriver and her husband Sargent Shriver, chairman and president respectively of the Special Olympics.

 

History the stamp represents:  Eunice Kennedy Shriver, sister of President John F. Kennedy, was the founder of the Special Olympics. In 1962, she opened “Camp Shriver” in her backyard to provide children with intellectual disabilities a place to play. This turned into an annual event and led to the creation of similar camps across the nation.

 

Next, Shriver called for nationwide sports contests. She received a proposal from the Chicago Park District for a citywide track meet, similar to the Olympics. Excited by the idea, she asked that it be opened to athletes from around the country. Held on July 20, 1968, the event became the first Special Olympics.   One thousand athletes from the United States and Canada participated in about 200 events.  The first Winter Special Olympics was held in 1977. 

 

The Special Olympics movement has since grown to include about 4.4 million athletes in over 170 countries. There are thousands of competitions yearly, with World Summer and Winter Games every two years. The International Olympic Committee officially recognized the Special Olympics in 1988.

 

Special Olympics provide genuine sports, competition, and achievement opportunities for adults and children with intellectual disabilities. As the focus on disabilities fades, people drop the emphasis on what Special Olympics athletes cannot do, and instead celebrate their skills and accomplishments.

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U.S. #2142
1985 22¢ Winter Special Olympics

  • First BEP-printed stamp with metallic ink
  • Honors the third Special Olympics World Winter Games

Stamp Category:  Commemorative
Value: 
22¢; first-class rate
First Day of Issue: 
March 25, 1985
First Day City: 
Park City, Utah
Quantity Issued: 
120,580,000
Printed by: 
Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: 
Photogravure
Format: 
Panes of 40 in sheets of 160
Perforations:  11

 

Why the stamp was issued:  To recognize the 1985 Winter Special Olympics.

 

About the stamp design:  Originally, the USPS planned to honor the Winter Special Olympics with a postal card.  The Special Olympics organization hadn’t pushed for a stamp, but once they learned the USPS was planning one, they offered suggestions on the design.  The stamp’s artwork was created by children’s book illustrator Jeff Cornell, who had also designed the 1979 Special Olympics stamp. The center of the stamp features the organization’s logo, with a female skater and make skier on either side.

 

About the printing process:  These were the first US stamps printed by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) with metallic ink.  In 1984, contract printers American Bank Note Company (ABNC) and J.W. Fergusson had printed two stamps with metallic ink.  However, their oil-based metallic ink didn’t take cancellations well.  So, the BEP experimented with a water-based metallic ink for this stamp.  The phosphor tagging ink was also water-based, which was another first.  The metallic blue ink was used for the stick figures in the circle at the center of the stamp.  It doesn’t have as much shine as the ABNC stamps, but it does have silver in it, with the BEP calling it a “metallic opaque ink.” 

 

First Day City:  The First Day ceremony for this stamp was held at the Yarrow Hotel in Park City, Utah, on the opening day of the 1985 Winter Special Olympic Games.  Among the attendees at the First Day ceremony were Eunice Kennedy Shriver and her husband Sargent Shriver, chairman and president respectively of the Special Olympics.

 

History the stamp represents:  Eunice Kennedy Shriver, sister of President John F. Kennedy, was the founder of the Special Olympics. In 1962, she opened “Camp Shriver” in her backyard to provide children with intellectual disabilities a place to play. This turned into an annual event and led to the creation of similar camps across the nation.

 

Next, Shriver called for nationwide sports contests. She received a proposal from the Chicago Park District for a citywide track meet, similar to the Olympics. Excited by the idea, she asked that it be opened to athletes from around the country. Held on July 20, 1968, the event became the first Special Olympics.   One thousand athletes from the United States and Canada participated in about 200 events.  The first Winter Special Olympics was held in 1977. 

 

The Special Olympics movement has since grown to include about 4.4 million athletes in over 170 countries. There are thousands of competitions yearly, with World Summer and Winter Games every two years. The International Olympic Committee officially recognized the Special Olympics in 1988.

 

Special Olympics provide genuine sports, competition, and achievement opportunities for adults and children with intellectual disabilities. As the focus on disabilities fades, people drop the emphasis on what Special Olympics athletes cannot do, and instead celebrate their skills and accomplishments.