1988 25c Pheasant, booklet single

# 2283 - 1988 25c Pheasant, booklet single

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U.S. #2283
1988 25¢ Pheasant, booklet single

  • First USPS stamp booklet made outside the BEP
  • First stamp booklet made for the new 25¢ first-class rate

Stamp Category:  Definitive
Value: 
25¢, first-class rate
First Day of Issue: 
April 29, 1988
First Day City: 
Rapid City, South Dakota
Quantity Issued: 
2,141,620,540
Printed by: 
American Bank Note Company
Printing Method: 
Photogravure
Format: 
Booklet panes of 10 stamps in sheets of 400
Perforations:  11 on 2 or 3 sides

 

Why the stamp was issued:  The USPS created this booklet in response to customer calls for booklets with more color and variety.

 

About the stamp design:  Wildlife artist Chuck Ripper painted the ring-necked pheasant on this stamp.  He originally produced the painting at a larger size for a priority mail stamp.  But the USPS decided to use the design for the booklet stamp instead.  He created his painting from photos, but was also familiar with the birds, having seen them frequently growing up in Pennsylvania.

 

First Day City:  The First Day ceremony for this stamp was held in Rapid City, South Dakota.  The ring-necked pheasant is the South Dakota state bird.

 

Unusual fact about this stamp:  During the initial printing of the stamp, the sky was a darker blue, make from small dots of blue and red ink.  However, the USPS decided they wanted the sky to be lighter, so in later printings, they eliminated the red dots and only printed the blue, resulting in a noticeably lighter sky.  The lighter sky is its own variety, identified by Scott Catalogue as 2283b.  Imperforate pairs and scarce imperforate panes from printers waste also exist.

 

History the stamp represents:  Until 1881, the "common pheasant," as it is sometimes referred to, was anything but. A native of China, the ring-neck was successfully introduced when Owen H. Denny, consul general at Shanghai, shipped 21 of the birds to his brother's farm in Corvallis, Oregon. Today, the ring-necked pheasant, with its colorful plumage of iridescent greens, purples, and copper is found throughout the northern continental US and lower Canada.

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U.S. #2283
1988 25¢ Pheasant, booklet single

  • First USPS stamp booklet made outside the BEP
  • First stamp booklet made for the new 25¢ first-class rate

Stamp Category:  Definitive
Value: 
25¢, first-class rate
First Day of Issue: 
April 29, 1988
First Day City: 
Rapid City, South Dakota
Quantity Issued: 
2,141,620,540
Printed by: 
American Bank Note Company
Printing Method: 
Photogravure
Format: 
Booklet panes of 10 stamps in sheets of 400
Perforations:  11 on 2 or 3 sides

 

Why the stamp was issued:  The USPS created this booklet in response to customer calls for booklets with more color and variety.

 

About the stamp design:  Wildlife artist Chuck Ripper painted the ring-necked pheasant on this stamp.  He originally produced the painting at a larger size for a priority mail stamp.  But the USPS decided to use the design for the booklet stamp instead.  He created his painting from photos, but was also familiar with the birds, having seen them frequently growing up in Pennsylvania.

 

First Day City:  The First Day ceremony for this stamp was held in Rapid City, South Dakota.  The ring-necked pheasant is the South Dakota state bird.

 

Unusual fact about this stamp:  During the initial printing of the stamp, the sky was a darker blue, make from small dots of blue and red ink.  However, the USPS decided they wanted the sky to be lighter, so in later printings, they eliminated the red dots and only printed the blue, resulting in a noticeably lighter sky.  The lighter sky is its own variety, identified by Scott Catalogue as 2283b.  Imperforate pairs and scarce imperforate panes from printers waste also exist.

 

History the stamp represents:  Until 1881, the "common pheasant," as it is sometimes referred to, was anything but. A native of China, the ring-neck was successfully introduced when Owen H. Denny, consul general at Shanghai, shipped 21 of the birds to his brother's farm in Corvallis, Oregon. Today, the ring-necked pheasant, with its colorful plumage of iridescent greens, purples, and copper is found throughout the northern continental US and lower Canada.