1991 29c World War II

# 2559 FDC - 1991 29c World War II

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US #2559
1991 1941: A World at War

  • First Day Cover
  • First in a series of sheets commemorating WW2
  • Highlights events that took place in 1941
  • Contains a world map showing Allied and Axis land

Category of Stamp:  Commemorative
Set: 
World War II
Value: 
29¢, First Class Mail rate
First Day of Issue: 
September 3, 1991
First Day City: 
Phoenix, Arizona
Quantity Issued: 
15,218,000
Printed by: 
Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:
Lithographed and engraved
Format: 
Miniature sheets of 10 stamps, with a strip of five along the top and another along the bottom, with a world map in the center.
Perforations: 
11

Reason the stamp was issued:  This sheet was issued in honor of the 50th anniversary of America entering World War II.

About the stamp design:  There were many topics the USPS wanted to cover when commemorating World War II, but those planning the series didn’t want to issue a large number of stamps.  It was decided a sheetlet format would best highlight the main events of the war.  In order for all the sheetlets to have a uniform design, the same artist, William Bond, and art director, Howard Paine, were assigned to the entire project.

The 1941 sheet features Burma Road, Peacetime Draft, the Lend-Lease agreement, Civil Defense, the Atlantic Charter meeting, Pearl Harbor, and the US declaration of war. 

First Day City:  The First Day of Issue ceremony took place during the opening ceremonies of the American Legion conference in Phoenix, Arizona.

Unusual thing about this stamp:  The design for this World War II sheet was unveiled during a White House ceremony.  President George H. W. Bush, who was a US Navy pilot during the war, participated in the unveiling ceremony.

About the World War II Series:  As the 50th anniversary of World War II was approaching, the US Postal Service wanted a series that would recognize the key events of the war and the important contributions America made to the Allied victory.  Rather than issue a large number of stamps, the USPS decided to create five sheetlets, each commemorating one year of America’s involvement in the war.  Each sheetlet had 10 different stamps arranged in two horizontal strips of 5.  In the center was a world map with Allied and neutral nations in yellow and Axis-controlled areas in red.  Notes on the map highlighted key developments that occurred that year.  The stamps each featured important events that took place during the year, as well.

History the stamp represents: 

The stamps feature the following events:

Burma Road, 717-Mile Lifeline to China
The Burma Road linked Burma (now Myanmar) with China.  It was built between 1937 and 1939 so China could receive supplies.  Japan had blockaded water routes to China.  The road was 717 miles long and wound through mountains.  Burmese and Chinese laborers built much of the road.

In 1942, the Japanese invaded Burma and closed the road.  When the Allies recaptured the country in late 1944, the road was once again open to supply much needed aid to China.

America’s First Peacetime Draft, 1940
The Selective Training and Service Act of 1940 was America’s first peacetime draft.  It required men between the ages of 21 and 35 to register with the local draft boards.  Men were then chosen by a national lottery to serve one year of active service and 10 years in reserves.  The draft began in October 1940, and the first men began training the next month. 

US Supports Allies with Lend-Lease Act
The Lend-Lease Act was enacted in March 1941 to supply the United Kingdom, the Soviet Union, France China, and other Allied nations with food, oil, and materials (such as vehicles and weapons) needed to fight against the Axis Powers.  Over the course of the war, the US sent more then $50 billion worth of supplies (that’s over $700 billion in today’s wages).

Atlantic Charter Sets War Aims of Allies
The Atlantic Charter was the result of an August 1941 meeting between US President Franklin D. Roosevelt and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill.  The charter set out the goals for after the war ended.  It addressed national boundaries, self-government, better economic conditions for all people, and disarming aggressor nations.  The charter led to other international agreements and was foundational to the establishment of the United Nations.

America Becomes “Arsenal of Democracy”
During a radio broadcast on December 29, 1940, President Franklin D. Roosevelt promised to help the United Kingdom fight against Nazi Germany by offering military supplies.  America soon became “the great arsenal of democracy,” supplying our Allies without entering the war.  Industries across the nation began retooling for the war effort.

Destroyer Reuben James Sunk October 31
USS Reuben James (DD-245) was an American destroyer commissioned in 1920.  On October 31, 1941, it was part of an American escort convoy for British ships sailing near Iceland when it was torpedoed by a German U-boat.  The ship became the first US ship to be sunk during the war, and 100 lives were lost in the attack.

Civil Defense Mobilizes Americans at Home
The Office of Civilian Defense was established by executive order in May 1941.  It oversaw federal and state efforts to protect citizens in case of a war emergency, such as an air raid.  Protective measures included blackouts and functions needed during war such as child care, housing, and transportation.  The Civil Air Patrol was part of the Civil Defense.  Over 11 million Americans volunteered to participate, and children who were in the Junior Citizens Service Corps collected scrap for wartime drives.

First Liberty Ship Delivered December 30
In early 1940, the British were losing ships faster than they new ones could be built, so they ask the US for help.  Adapting a British design, the US Maritime Commission developed a ship that filled the need and could be built quickly and relatively cheaply.  The new design became known as liberty ships because President Roosevelt promised they would help bring liberty to Europe.  The first Liberty ship to be delivered was the SS Patrick Henry, who famously said, “Give me liberty, or give me death.”

A key part of the speed of construction was replacing rivets with welding.  The ships were constructed in sections then welded together.  While the first ships took about 230 days to build, by 1943 that time was cut to just 39 days.

Japanese Bomb Pearl Harbor, December 7
Just before 8:00 a.m. on Sunday December 7, 1941, the Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service attacked the US naval base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.  Aircraft flew over the harbor and dropped bombs and torpedoes on the battleships moored there.  During the course of the attack, America suffered 3,500 casualties, five ships were sunk, and thirteen more were damaged.  In addition, the base and nearby aircraft were also heavily damaged.  Later that day, Japan declared war on the US.

U.S. Declares War on Japan, December 8
The day after Pearl Harbor was attacked, President Roosevelt addressed a joint session of Congress and the American people.  Calling December 7, 1941, “a date which will live in infamy,” he asked Congress to declare war on Japan.  Both houses immediately voted to enact the President’s request.  Three days later, Germany and Italy declared war on the US.  Congress, in turn, voted unanimously to declare war on them as well.  The US had officially entered World War II.

 

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US #2559
1991 1941: A World at War

  • First Day Cover
  • First in a series of sheets commemorating WW2
  • Highlights events that took place in 1941
  • Contains a world map showing Allied and Axis land

Category of Stamp:  Commemorative
Set: 
World War II
Value: 
29¢, First Class Mail rate
First Day of Issue: 
September 3, 1991
First Day City: 
Phoenix, Arizona
Quantity Issued: 
15,218,000
Printed by: 
Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:
Lithographed and engraved
Format: 
Miniature sheets of 10 stamps, with a strip of five along the top and another along the bottom, with a world map in the center.
Perforations: 
11

Reason the stamp was issued:  This sheet was issued in honor of the 50th anniversary of America entering World War II.

About the stamp design:  There were many topics the USPS wanted to cover when commemorating World War II, but those planning the series didn’t want to issue a large number of stamps.  It was decided a sheetlet format would best highlight the main events of the war.  In order for all the sheetlets to have a uniform design, the same artist, William Bond, and art director, Howard Paine, were assigned to the entire project.

The 1941 sheet features Burma Road, Peacetime Draft, the Lend-Lease agreement, Civil Defense, the Atlantic Charter meeting, Pearl Harbor, and the US declaration of war. 

First Day City:  The First Day of Issue ceremony took place during the opening ceremonies of the American Legion conference in Phoenix, Arizona.

Unusual thing about this stamp:  The design for this World War II sheet was unveiled during a White House ceremony.  President George H. W. Bush, who was a US Navy pilot during the war, participated in the unveiling ceremony.

About the World War II Series:  As the 50th anniversary of World War II was approaching, the US Postal Service wanted a series that would recognize the key events of the war and the important contributions America made to the Allied victory.  Rather than issue a large number of stamps, the USPS decided to create five sheetlets, each commemorating one year of America’s involvement in the war.  Each sheetlet had 10 different stamps arranged in two horizontal strips of 5.  In the center was a world map with Allied and neutral nations in yellow and Axis-controlled areas in red.  Notes on the map highlighted key developments that occurred that year.  The stamps each featured important events that took place during the year, as well.

History the stamp represents: 

The stamps feature the following events:

Burma Road, 717-Mile Lifeline to China
The Burma Road linked Burma (now Myanmar) with China.  It was built between 1937 and 1939 so China could receive supplies.  Japan had blockaded water routes to China.  The road was 717 miles long and wound through mountains.  Burmese and Chinese laborers built much of the road.

In 1942, the Japanese invaded Burma and closed the road.  When the Allies recaptured the country in late 1944, the road was once again open to supply much needed aid to China.

America’s First Peacetime Draft, 1940
The Selective Training and Service Act of 1940 was America’s first peacetime draft.  It required men between the ages of 21 and 35 to register with the local draft boards.  Men were then chosen by a national lottery to serve one year of active service and 10 years in reserves.  The draft began in October 1940, and the first men began training the next month. 

US Supports Allies with Lend-Lease Act
The Lend-Lease Act was enacted in March 1941 to supply the United Kingdom, the Soviet Union, France China, and other Allied nations with food, oil, and materials (such as vehicles and weapons) needed to fight against the Axis Powers.  Over the course of the war, the US sent more then $50 billion worth of supplies (that’s over $700 billion in today’s wages).

Atlantic Charter Sets War Aims of Allies
The Atlantic Charter was the result of an August 1941 meeting between US President Franklin D. Roosevelt and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill.  The charter set out the goals for after the war ended.  It addressed national boundaries, self-government, better economic conditions for all people, and disarming aggressor nations.  The charter led to other international agreements and was foundational to the establishment of the United Nations.

America Becomes “Arsenal of Democracy”
During a radio broadcast on December 29, 1940, President Franklin D. Roosevelt promised to help the United Kingdom fight against Nazi Germany by offering military supplies.  America soon became “the great arsenal of democracy,” supplying our Allies without entering the war.  Industries across the nation began retooling for the war effort.

Destroyer Reuben James Sunk October 31
USS Reuben James (DD-245) was an American destroyer commissioned in 1920.  On October 31, 1941, it was part of an American escort convoy for British ships sailing near Iceland when it was torpedoed by a German U-boat.  The ship became the first US ship to be sunk during the war, and 100 lives were lost in the attack.

Civil Defense Mobilizes Americans at Home
The Office of Civilian Defense was established by executive order in May 1941.  It oversaw federal and state efforts to protect citizens in case of a war emergency, such as an air raid.  Protective measures included blackouts and functions needed during war such as child care, housing, and transportation.  The Civil Air Patrol was part of the Civil Defense.  Over 11 million Americans volunteered to participate, and children who were in the Junior Citizens Service Corps collected scrap for wartime drives.

First Liberty Ship Delivered December 30
In early 1940, the British were losing ships faster than they new ones could be built, so they ask the US for help.  Adapting a British design, the US Maritime Commission developed a ship that filled the need and could be built quickly and relatively cheaply.  The new design became known as liberty ships because President Roosevelt promised they would help bring liberty to Europe.  The first Liberty ship to be delivered was the SS Patrick Henry, who famously said, “Give me liberty, or give me death.”

A key part of the speed of construction was replacing rivets with welding.  The ships were constructed in sections then welded together.  While the first ships took about 230 days to build, by 1943 that time was cut to just 39 days.

Japanese Bomb Pearl Harbor, December 7
Just before 8:00 a.m. on Sunday December 7, 1941, the Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service attacked the US naval base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.  Aircraft flew over the harbor and dropped bombs and torpedoes on the battleships moored there.  During the course of the attack, America suffered 3,500 casualties, five ships were sunk, and thirteen more were damaged.  In addition, the base and nearby aircraft were also heavily damaged.  Later that day, Japan declared war on the US.

U.S. Declares War on Japan, December 8
The day after Pearl Harbor was attacked, President Roosevelt addressed a joint session of Congress and the American people.  Calling December 7, 1941, “a date which will live in infamy,” he asked Congress to declare war on Japan.  Both houses immediately voted to enact the President’s request.  Three days later, Germany and Italy declared war on the US.  Congress, in turn, voted unanimously to declare war on them as well.  The US had officially entered World War II.