1992 29c World War II: Italy Invaded by Allies

# 2765f - 1992 29c World War II: Italy Invaded by Allies

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U.S. #2765f

1993 29¢ Italy Invaded by Allies, September 1943

1943: Turning the Tide

World War II 50th Anniversary Series

 

·      Stamp from the third in a series of five sheetlets commemorating the 50th anniversary of World War II

 

Stamp Category:  Commemorative

Set:  WWII 50th Anniversary

Value:  29¢

First Day of Issue:  May 31, 1993

First Day City(s):  Washington, DC

Quantity Issued (if known):  12,000,000

Printed by:  Bureau of Engraving and Printing

Printing Method:  Offset printing in plates of 80; intaglio printing in sleeves of 160

Format:  Sheetlet of 10 stamps arranged in two strips of five surrounding world map

Perforations:  11.1

 

Why this stamp was issued:  By the mid-1980s, Americans were already writing in to the Citizens’ Stamp Advisory Committee (CSAC) suggesting stamps honoring the upcoming anniversary of World War II.  The challenge would be creating enough stamps to appropriately honor the war, while not adding an extra 100 stamps to each year’s schedule.

 

To aid in this process, CSAC created a three-member World War II subcommittee to figure out how to select subjects for the stamps.  The committee then worked with Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine historians to develop a list of appropriate topics.  By April 1986 they had a list they believed would “properly recognize and honor all facets of national endeavor that contributed to victory.”  They also selected the themes for each year and recommended that the center of each sheet feature a world map surrounded by 10 stamps honoring significant events.

 

At various times, the group considered issuing a variety of stamps such as singles, se-tenant blocks of four, and souvenir sheets.  They also considered beginning the series in 1989, which would have marked the 50th anniversary of the start of the war in Europe.  In the end, they decided to produce five 10-stamp sheets commemorating the years the US was in the war – 1941 to 1945.

 

About the stamp design:  British-born artist and World War II veteran William H. Bond of Virginia was selected to create the art for the stamp.  He’d never designed stamps before, and the set of 50 was quite a challenge.  The stamps had to be immediately recognizable for each event, and their designs and color schemes had to vary enough that they didn’t look similar, but also appear balanced across the sheet.  It was also extremely important that the illustrations be accurate as millions of people who had participated in the war would be looking at them with a very critical eye.  Bond took inspiration from war-time photos, with some stamps being nearly identical and others a combination of multiple photos.

 

The Italy invaded by Allies stamp pictures a PT boat setting a smoke screen behind an amphibious command ship.  This was to protect the ship from torpedoes from German E-boats, which filled the waters around Salerno.  The USS Ancon served as the model for the PT boat.  This stamp was also of special significance to Bond as he had participated in the invasion of Italy and helped establish a signal station in Salerno.

 

About the printing process:  This stamp was printed on the six-color offset, three-color intaglio webfed D press.

 

First Day City:  The sheetlet this stamp came from was issued on Memorial Day in a ceremony in the East Room of the White House.  This was President Bill Clinton’s first stamp dedication and during the ceremony he signed a proclamation making the following week one of national observance of the 50th anniversary of World War II. 

 

About the World War II 50th Anniversary Series:  Issued between 1991 and 1995, this series commemorates battles and events at home and abroad from the years America was involved in the war.  Each sheetlet features 10 stamps surrounding a detailed map.  The world maps are masterpieces of thumbnail summaries. They call attention to the major military and political developments of the year and include events not featured on the individual stamps. Color coded for easy identification of friend and foe, they’re “a year in summary” at a glance.

 

History the stamp represents: 

By late July of 1943, the island of Sicily had fallen to the Allies. The Germans had retreated and escaped to the mainland. Spurred on by the success of the Sicilian campaign, Eisenhower favored an amphibious assault on the Italian mainland.

 

Although Mussolini’s successor, Pietro Badoglio was secretly holding peace talks with the Allies, Albert Kesselring, Commander of German Forces in the Mediterranean, was prepared to fight for control of Italy. On September 3, Italy secretly surrendered. Fearing German retaliation, the Italians asked that the surrender be kept quiet until the Allies attacked. Hoping to surprise the Germans, Eisenhower agreed.

 

On September 9, Allied forces swarmed onto the beaches of Salerno, which was secured after nine days of fighting. Encouraged, the Allies pushed north to Naples. Although they met little resistance, they found the port in shambles. Following Hitler’s orders, German troops had demolished the city, reducing it to a mere shell of its former self.

 

Believing the Germans would continue to steadily retreat north, Eisenhower decided to go for the glittering prize of Rome. However, German forces south of the city held the Allies at bay for six long months.

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U.S. #2765f

1993 29¢ Italy Invaded by Allies, September 1943

1943: Turning the Tide

World War II 50th Anniversary Series

 

·      Stamp from the third in a series of five sheetlets commemorating the 50th anniversary of World War II

 

Stamp Category:  Commemorative

Set:  WWII 50th Anniversary

Value:  29¢

First Day of Issue:  May 31, 1993

First Day City(s):  Washington, DC

Quantity Issued (if known):  12,000,000

Printed by:  Bureau of Engraving and Printing

Printing Method:  Offset printing in plates of 80; intaglio printing in sleeves of 160

Format:  Sheetlet of 10 stamps arranged in two strips of five surrounding world map

Perforations:  11.1

 

Why this stamp was issued:  By the mid-1980s, Americans were already writing in to the Citizens’ Stamp Advisory Committee (CSAC) suggesting stamps honoring the upcoming anniversary of World War II.  The challenge would be creating enough stamps to appropriately honor the war, while not adding an extra 100 stamps to each year’s schedule.

 

To aid in this process, CSAC created a three-member World War II subcommittee to figure out how to select subjects for the stamps.  The committee then worked with Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine historians to develop a list of appropriate topics.  By April 1986 they had a list they believed would “properly recognize and honor all facets of national endeavor that contributed to victory.”  They also selected the themes for each year and recommended that the center of each sheet feature a world map surrounded by 10 stamps honoring significant events.

 

At various times, the group considered issuing a variety of stamps such as singles, se-tenant blocks of four, and souvenir sheets.  They also considered beginning the series in 1989, which would have marked the 50th anniversary of the start of the war in Europe.  In the end, they decided to produce five 10-stamp sheets commemorating the years the US was in the war – 1941 to 1945.

 

About the stamp design:  British-born artist and World War II veteran William H. Bond of Virginia was selected to create the art for the stamp.  He’d never designed stamps before, and the set of 50 was quite a challenge.  The stamps had to be immediately recognizable for each event, and their designs and color schemes had to vary enough that they didn’t look similar, but also appear balanced across the sheet.  It was also extremely important that the illustrations be accurate as millions of people who had participated in the war would be looking at them with a very critical eye.  Bond took inspiration from war-time photos, with some stamps being nearly identical and others a combination of multiple photos.

 

The Italy invaded by Allies stamp pictures a PT boat setting a smoke screen behind an amphibious command ship.  This was to protect the ship from torpedoes from German E-boats, which filled the waters around Salerno.  The USS Ancon served as the model for the PT boat.  This stamp was also of special significance to Bond as he had participated in the invasion of Italy and helped establish a signal station in Salerno.

 

About the printing process:  This stamp was printed on the six-color offset, three-color intaglio webfed D press.

 

First Day City:  The sheetlet this stamp came from was issued on Memorial Day in a ceremony in the East Room of the White House.  This was President Bill Clinton’s first stamp dedication and during the ceremony he signed a proclamation making the following week one of national observance of the 50th anniversary of World War II. 

 

About the World War II 50th Anniversary Series:  Issued between 1991 and 1995, this series commemorates battles and events at home and abroad from the years America was involved in the war.  Each sheetlet features 10 stamps surrounding a detailed map.  The world maps are masterpieces of thumbnail summaries. They call attention to the major military and political developments of the year and include events not featured on the individual stamps. Color coded for easy identification of friend and foe, they’re “a year in summary” at a glance.

 

History the stamp represents: 

By late July of 1943, the island of Sicily had fallen to the Allies. The Germans had retreated and escaped to the mainland. Spurred on by the success of the Sicilian campaign, Eisenhower favored an amphibious assault on the Italian mainland.

 

Although Mussolini’s successor, Pietro Badoglio was secretly holding peace talks with the Allies, Albert Kesselring, Commander of German Forces in the Mediterranean, was prepared to fight for control of Italy. On September 3, Italy secretly surrendered. Fearing German retaliation, the Italians asked that the surrender be kept quiet until the Allies attacked. Hoping to surprise the Germans, Eisenhower agreed.

 

On September 9, Allied forces swarmed onto the beaches of Salerno, which was secured after nine days of fighting. Encouraged, the Allies pushed north to Naples. Although they met little resistance, they found the port in shambles. Following Hitler’s orders, German troops had demolished the city, reducing it to a mere shell of its former self.

 

Believing the Germans would continue to steadily retreat north, Eisenhower decided to go for the glittering prize of Rome. However, German forces south of the city held the Allies at bay for six long months.