1992 29c World War II: Bonds and Stamps Help War Effort

# 2765g - 1992 29c World War II: Bonds and Stamps Help War Effort

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 U.S. #2765
29¢ Turning the Tide
World War II Sheet



Issue Date: May 31, 1993
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 6,000,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: 
Lithographed and engraved
Perforations: 
11
Color: Multicolored

 

 

World War II was the most significant event of the 20th century. The U.S. Postal Service began planning for the war’s 50th anniversary in 1985. It wanted to honor key events of the war effort as well as the various endeavors that contributed to the Allied victory. But how to do that without producing a thousand stamps?
 
The solution was a series of sheetlets, one for each year of the war, that consisted of a large center map framed by five stamps on the top and five on the bottom. Five years of commemorating World War II yielded five sheets and a total of 50 stamps – enough for an honorable tribute and enough to accomplish Postal Service goals.
 
The world maps are masterpieces of thumbnail summaries. They call attention to the major military and political developments of the year and include events not featured on the individual stamps. Color coded for easy identification of friend and foe, they’re “a year in summary” at a glance. Entitled “1943: Turning the Tide,” U.S. #2765 is the third sheet in the series of five.
Bonds and Stamps Help War Effort

 

Although the U.S. government paid for the costs of World War II in several ways, the most popular method was selling war bonds and war stamps to individuals and businesses. This form of borrowing, together with collection drives, special taxes, and rationing, joined Americans on the home front together in a morale-boosting enterprise, giving them a sense of participation in the war.
 
In addition to covering the phenomenal costs of the war, bonds and stamps also helped fight inflation by soaking up excess wages at a time when there were severe shortages of most consumer goods.
 
Initiated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1941, war bonds and stamps were extremely successful. To promote the program, Secretary of the Treasury Henry Morganthau recruited help from Madison Avenue, comic strip heroes, and big-name entertainers. Advertisers donated space and radio time worth an estimated $400 million and the popular actress, Hedy Lamar promised to kiss anyone who purchased $25,000 worth of bonds. 
 
In all, Americans purchased $135 billion in bonds during the war. Using nickels and dimes, children alone contributed more than a billion dollars.

 

 

Happy Birthday Bette Davis 

Ruth Elizabeth Davis was born on April 5, 1908, in Lowell, Massachusetts.

Known as “Betty” from an early age, she attended a Spartan boarding school before moving with her family to New York City in 1921. It was around this time that she changed her name to “Bette” after Honoré de Balzac’s novel La Cousine Bette.

In 1926 Davis attended Henrik Ibsen’s production of The Wild Duck, starting Peg Entwistle. Davis later claimed that it was Entwistle that inspired her to join the theater. She found her first paid acting job as a chorus girl in the play Broadway. Then in 1929 she was hired to play Entwistle’s role in The Wild Duck. Davis went on to perform in theaters in Philadelphia, Washington, and Boston before making her Broadway debut in Broken Dishes in 1929.

The following year Davis moved to Hollywood for her first screen test. Though her first two screen tests didn’t go well, cinematographer Karl Freund remarked that she had “lovely eyes” and recommended her for a part in Bad Sister, which would mark her film debut. Davis then had small parts in a string of unsuccessful movies, which led to plan to move back to New York. But then actor George Arliss suggested she play the female lead in The Man Who Played God. The film was a success and Davis always credited Arliss with helping her get her break in Hollywood.

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 U.S. #2765
29¢ Turning the Tide
World War II Sheet



Issue Date: May 31, 1993
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 6,000,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: 
Lithographed and engraved
Perforations: 
11
Color: Multicolored

 

 

World War II was the most significant event of the 20th century. The U.S. Postal Service began planning for the war’s 50th anniversary in 1985. It wanted to honor key events of the war effort as well as the various endeavors that contributed to the Allied victory. But how to do that without producing a thousand stamps?
 
The solution was a series of sheetlets, one for each year of the war, that consisted of a large center map framed by five stamps on the top and five on the bottom. Five years of commemorating World War II yielded five sheets and a total of 50 stamps – enough for an honorable tribute and enough to accomplish Postal Service goals.
 
The world maps are masterpieces of thumbnail summaries. They call attention to the major military and political developments of the year and include events not featured on the individual stamps. Color coded for easy identification of friend and foe, they’re “a year in summary” at a glance. Entitled “1943: Turning the Tide,” U.S. #2765 is the third sheet in the series of five.
Bonds and Stamps Help War Effort

 

Although the U.S. government paid for the costs of World War II in several ways, the most popular method was selling war bonds and war stamps to individuals and businesses. This form of borrowing, together with collection drives, special taxes, and rationing, joined Americans on the home front together in a morale-boosting enterprise, giving them a sense of participation in the war.
 
In addition to covering the phenomenal costs of the war, bonds and stamps also helped fight inflation by soaking up excess wages at a time when there were severe shortages of most consumer goods.
 
Initiated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1941, war bonds and stamps were extremely successful. To promote the program, Secretary of the Treasury Henry Morganthau recruited help from Madison Avenue, comic strip heroes, and big-name entertainers. Advertisers donated space and radio time worth an estimated $400 million and the popular actress, Hedy Lamar promised to kiss anyone who purchased $25,000 worth of bonds. 
 
In all, Americans purchased $135 billion in bonds during the war. Using nickels and dimes, children alone contributed more than a billion dollars.

 

 

Happy Birthday Bette Davis 

Ruth Elizabeth Davis was born on April 5, 1908, in Lowell, Massachusetts.

Known as “Betty” from an early age, she attended a Spartan boarding school before moving with her family to New York City in 1921. It was around this time that she changed her name to “Bette” after Honoré de Balzac’s novel La Cousine Bette.

In 1926 Davis attended Henrik Ibsen’s production of The Wild Duck, starting Peg Entwistle. Davis later claimed that it was Entwistle that inspired her to join the theater. She found her first paid acting job as a chorus girl in the play Broadway. Then in 1929 she was hired to play Entwistle’s role in The Wild Duck. Davis went on to perform in theaters in Philadelphia, Washington, and Boston before making her Broadway debut in Broken Dishes in 1929.

The following year Davis moved to Hollywood for her first screen test. Though her first two screen tests didn’t go well, cinematographer Karl Freund remarked that she had “lovely eyes” and recommended her for a part in Bad Sister, which would mark her film debut. Davis then had small parts in a string of unsuccessful movies, which led to plan to move back to New York. But then actor George Arliss suggested she play the female lead in The Man Who Played God. The film was a success and Davis always credited Arliss with helping her get her break in Hollywood.