1995 32c Allies liberate Holocaust survivers

# 2981e FDC - 1995 32c Allies liberate Holocaust survivers

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U.S. #2981e
Allies liberate Holocaust survivors, early 1945 – World War II

  • Fifth and final souvenir sheet issued to commemorate the 50th anniversary of World War II
  • Includes 10 stamps plus a world map

Stamp Category:  Commemorative
Series:  World War II
Value:  32¢ (Denomination of each individual stamp)
First Day of Issue:  September 2, 1995
First Day City:  Honolulu, Hawaii
Quantity Issued (if known):  100,000,000
Printed by:  Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:  Offset, Intaglio
Format:  Sheetlets of 10 (arranged in 2 strips of 5, one across the top and one across the bottom of the sheetlet, with world map in between)
Perforations:  11.1 (Eureka off-line perforator)
Tagging:  Overall, large block covering stamps and part of selvage

Why the stamp was issued:  This souvenir sheet was issued to commemorate the 50th anniversary of World War II.  It was the last in a series of five that were issued over the course of five years.

About the stamp design:  William Bond the stamp designer used a photo taken by Margaret Bourke-White at the Buchenwald concentration camp after liberation in 1945. He altered the photo, so the people are in more grayish tones to be more somber and reflecting the subject.

First Day City:  The stamps were dedicated in Honolulu, Hawaii.  Aboard the aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson, the ceremony took place in view of the USS Arizona Memorial.

About the World War II Series:  As the 50th anniversary of World War II was approaching, the US Postal Service wanted a series that would recognize the key events of the war and the important contributions America made to the Allied victory.  Rather than issue a large number of stamps, the USPS decided to create five sheetlets, each commemorating one year of America’s involvement in the war.  Each sheetlet had 10 different stamps arranged in two horizontal strips of 5.  In the center was a world map with Allied and neutral nations in yellow and Axis-controlled areas in red.  Notes on the map highlighted key developments that occurred that year.  The stamps each featured important events that took place during the year, as well.

History the stamp represents:  The Holocaust was the mass murder of European Jews and other ethnic groups, such as Gypsies, Poles, and Slavs, by the Nazis during World War II.  Adolf Hitler considered the Jews and these other groups to be genetically inferior to his “Aryan” master race.  Removing the Jews was one of the steps in Hitler’s plan for world domination.

To facilitate this mass murder the Nazis built concentration camps.  At first these highly organized camps were used to terrorize and intimidate, but in 1941 when Hitler decided to murder all of the Jews, the camps became efficient killing factories.  About 2.5 million people were murdered at the concentration camp in Auschwitz, Poland alone.  As many as 2,000 people were killed at a single time in the gas chambers there.  Bodies were disposed of in crematoriums.

The battle-hardened Allied soldiers who liberated the camps were shocked at what they found.  By the end of the war approximately 6 million Jews, about two-thirds of all the Jews in Europe, had been killed by the Nazis.  Total number of civilians killed by the Nazis is estimated to be as least 11 million.

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U.S. #2981e
Allies liberate Holocaust survivors, early 1945 – World War II

  • Fifth and final souvenir sheet issued to commemorate the 50th anniversary of World War II
  • Includes 10 stamps plus a world map

Stamp Category:  Commemorative
Series:  World War II
Value:  32¢ (Denomination of each individual stamp)
First Day of Issue:  September 2, 1995
First Day City:  Honolulu, Hawaii
Quantity Issued (if known):  100,000,000
Printed by:  Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:  Offset, Intaglio
Format:  Sheetlets of 10 (arranged in 2 strips of 5, one across the top and one across the bottom of the sheetlet, with world map in between)
Perforations:  11.1 (Eureka off-line perforator)
Tagging:  Overall, large block covering stamps and part of selvage

Why the stamp was issued:  This souvenir sheet was issued to commemorate the 50th anniversary of World War II.  It was the last in a series of five that were issued over the course of five years.

About the stamp design:  William Bond the stamp designer used a photo taken by Margaret Bourke-White at the Buchenwald concentration camp after liberation in 1945. He altered the photo, so the people are in more grayish tones to be more somber and reflecting the subject.

First Day City:  The stamps were dedicated in Honolulu, Hawaii.  Aboard the aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson, the ceremony took place in view of the USS Arizona Memorial.

About the World War II Series:  As the 50th anniversary of World War II was approaching, the US Postal Service wanted a series that would recognize the key events of the war and the important contributions America made to the Allied victory.  Rather than issue a large number of stamps, the USPS decided to create five sheetlets, each commemorating one year of America’s involvement in the war.  Each sheetlet had 10 different stamps arranged in two horizontal strips of 5.  In the center was a world map with Allied and neutral nations in yellow and Axis-controlled areas in red.  Notes on the map highlighted key developments that occurred that year.  The stamps each featured important events that took place during the year, as well.

History the stamp represents:  The Holocaust was the mass murder of European Jews and other ethnic groups, such as Gypsies, Poles, and Slavs, by the Nazis during World War II.  Adolf Hitler considered the Jews and these other groups to be genetically inferior to his “Aryan” master race.  Removing the Jews was one of the steps in Hitler’s plan for world domination.

To facilitate this mass murder the Nazis built concentration camps.  At first these highly organized camps were used to terrorize and intimidate, but in 1941 when Hitler decided to murder all of the Jews, the camps became efficient killing factories.  About 2.5 million people were murdered at the concentration camp in Auschwitz, Poland alone.  As many as 2,000 people were killed at a single time in the gas chambers there.  Bodies were disposed of in crematoriums.

The battle-hardened Allied soldiers who liberated the camps were shocked at what they found.  By the end of the war approximately 6 million Jews, about two-thirds of all the Jews in Europe, had been killed by the Nazis.  Total number of civilians killed by the Nazis is estimated to be as least 11 million.