1998 32c Celebrate the Century,1900s: St. Louis World Fair

# 3182e - 1998 32c Celebrate the Century - 1900s: St. Louis World Fair

$1.95 - $3.20
(No reviews yet) Write a Review
Image Condition Price Qty
321962
Fleetwood First Day Cover Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 3.20
$ 3.20
0
321963
Mystic First Day Cover Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 2.95
$ 2.95
1
321961
Classic First Day Cover Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 2.25
$ 2.25
2
321965
Mint Stamp(s) Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 1.95
$ 1.95
3
Show More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Mount Price Qty

US #3182e
1998 St. Louis World’s Fair – Celebrate the Century (1900s)

• Part of the first sheet in the Celebrate the Century stamp series issued from 1998-2000
• Honors the St. Louis World’s Fair
• Includes text on the back with historical details


Stamp Category:
Commemorative
Series: Celebrate the Century
Value: 32¢ First Class Mail Rate
First Day of Issue: February 3, 1998
First Day City: Washington, DC
Quantity Issued: 188,000,000
Printed by: Ashton Potter (USA) Ltd.
Printing Method: Offset, Intaglio
Format: Panes of 15
Perforations: 11.6
Tagging: Block Tagging

Why the stamp was issued: To commemorate the St. Louis World’s Fair and its historical and cultural significance in America.

About the stamp design: Pictures gouache and colored pencil illustration of two children enjoying ice cream cones at the fair by artist Richard Waldrep. Includes the following text on the back “The Louisiana Purchase Exposition of 1904 was also known as the St. Louis World’s Fair. Americans were already enjoying ice cream, but the ice cream cone was popularized at the fair.”

First Day City: The First Day of Issue Ceremony was held in Washington, DC, with legendary radio and television host Larry King as master of ceremonies.

About the Celebrate the Century series: The USPS launched the Celebrate the Century series in 1998 to mark the end of the 20th century and herald the arrival of the 21st. The series includes 10 sheets of 15 stamps (150 in total), with each honoring important moments from a different decade (1900s, 10s, 20s, 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s, 70s, 80s, and 90s). At the time of completion, it was the longest and most ambitious commemorative stamp series in US history.

History the stamp represents: The ice cream cone is an American favorite. Whether chocolate, vanilla, or any other flavor, everyone loves a classic ice cream cone on a hot summer’s day. But the inventor of this handheld treat has been the subject of debate for many years.

In 1904, St. Louis held the Louisiana Purchase Exposition. Many vendors were selling their creations at this world’s fair. One was Ernest Hamwi, who made waffle-like pastries. When the ice cream stand next to him ran out of serving cups, Hamwi reportedly rolled one of his waffles into a cone shape to hold the ice cream. The idea was a hit, and soon other vendors at the fair were following his lead.

Around the same time, Italo Marchiony filed an application for a patent to make edible ice cream cups. However, there was a big difference between Marchiony’s and Hamwi’s designs. The patent filed by Marchiony detailed a flat-bottomed cup with tapered sides. Hamwi’s pastry was a traditional cone shape with a pointed bottom. Ice cream connoisseurs disagree on who the true inventor of the cone is to this day.

Origins aside, the popularity of the ice cream cone took off. By 1924, Americans were enjoying over 245 million cones each year. Today, that number is in the billions. Hot summer day’s wouldn’t be the same without this delicious and convenient frozen treat.

Read More - Click Here

US #3182e
1998 St. Louis World’s Fair – Celebrate the Century (1900s)

• Part of the first sheet in the Celebrate the Century stamp series issued from 1998-2000
• Honors the St. Louis World’s Fair
• Includes text on the back with historical details


Stamp Category:
Commemorative
Series: Celebrate the Century
Value: 32¢ First Class Mail Rate
First Day of Issue: February 3, 1998
First Day City: Washington, DC
Quantity Issued: 188,000,000
Printed by: Ashton Potter (USA) Ltd.
Printing Method: Offset, Intaglio
Format: Panes of 15
Perforations: 11.6
Tagging: Block Tagging

Why the stamp was issued: To commemorate the St. Louis World’s Fair and its historical and cultural significance in America.

About the stamp design: Pictures gouache and colored pencil illustration of two children enjoying ice cream cones at the fair by artist Richard Waldrep. Includes the following text on the back “The Louisiana Purchase Exposition of 1904 was also known as the St. Louis World’s Fair. Americans were already enjoying ice cream, but the ice cream cone was popularized at the fair.”

First Day City: The First Day of Issue Ceremony was held in Washington, DC, with legendary radio and television host Larry King as master of ceremonies.

About the Celebrate the Century series: The USPS launched the Celebrate the Century series in 1998 to mark the end of the 20th century and herald the arrival of the 21st. The series includes 10 sheets of 15 stamps (150 in total), with each honoring important moments from a different decade (1900s, 10s, 20s, 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s, 70s, 80s, and 90s). At the time of completion, it was the longest and most ambitious commemorative stamp series in US history.

History the stamp represents: The ice cream cone is an American favorite. Whether chocolate, vanilla, or any other flavor, everyone loves a classic ice cream cone on a hot summer’s day. But the inventor of this handheld treat has been the subject of debate for many years.

In 1904, St. Louis held the Louisiana Purchase Exposition. Many vendors were selling their creations at this world’s fair. One was Ernest Hamwi, who made waffle-like pastries. When the ice cream stand next to him ran out of serving cups, Hamwi reportedly rolled one of his waffles into a cone shape to hold the ice cream. The idea was a hit, and soon other vendors at the fair were following his lead.

Around the same time, Italo Marchiony filed an application for a patent to make edible ice cream cups. However, there was a big difference between Marchiony’s and Hamwi’s designs. The patent filed by Marchiony detailed a flat-bottomed cup with tapered sides. Hamwi’s pastry was a traditional cone shape with a pointed bottom. Ice cream connoisseurs disagree on who the true inventor of the cone is to this day.

Origins aside, the popularity of the ice cream cone took off. By 1924, Americans were enjoying over 245 million cones each year. Today, that number is in the billions. Hot summer day’s wouldn’t be the same without this delicious and convenient frozen treat.