1998 32c Celebrate the Century,1900s: Immigrants Arrive

# 3182i - 1998 32c Celebrate the Century - 1900s: Immigrants Arrive

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US #3182i
1998 Immigrants Arrive – Celebrate the Century (1900s)

• Part of the first sheet in the Celebrate the Century stamp series issued from 1998-2000
• Honors the countless immigrants who made their way to America in the 1900s
• Includes text on the back with historical details


Stamp Category:
Commemorative
Series: Celebrate the Century
Value: 32¢ First Class Mail Rate
First Day of Issue: February 3, 1998
First Day City: Washington, DC
Quantity Issued: 188,000,000
Printed by: Ashton Potter (USA) Ltd.
Printing Method: Offset, Intaglio
Format: Panes of 15
Perforations: 11.6
Tagging: Block Tagging

Why the stamp was issued: To commemorate the influx of immigrants in the 1900s and their historical and cultural significance in America.

About the stamp design: Pictures gouache and colored pencil illustration of immigrants by artist Richard Waldrep. Includes the following text on the back “Ellis Island was the nation’s principal immigration station between 1892 and 1954. During the peak decade of 1900-1909, immigrants arrived on an average of 100 an hour.”

First Day City: The First Day of Issue Ceremony was held in Washington, DC, with legendary radio and television host Larry King as master of ceremonies.

About the Celebrate the Century series: The USPS launched the Celebrate the Century series in 1998 to mark the end of the 20th century and herald the arrival of the 21st. The series includes 10 sheets of 15 stamps (150 in total), with each honoring important moments from a different decade (1900s, 10s, 20s, 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s, 70s, 80s, and 90s). At the time of completion, it was the longest and most ambitious commemorative stamp series in US history.

History the stamp represents: The United States has long been known as a nation of immigrants, and indeed, more immigrants have come to this country than to any other. This was especially true from 1901 to 1910, when nearly nine million people came to the United States with the common hope of starting new and better lives. Most of these newcomers entered the country through Ellis island, which was the main reception center for immigrants of the era.

During the period of “new immigration,” which began in the 1890s, people came from Italy, Russia, Poland, Yugoslavia, Germany, and Greece. These immigrants longed to leave behind the poverty and overpopulation of southern and eastern Europe. Willing to work hard and eager to learn, they became some of the most productive Americans of the twentieth century.

Ellis Island, open as an immigration station from 1892 until 1954, has been restored and is now the site of a museum celebrating the immigrant experience. An estimated forty percent of all Americans have ancestors who first came to our country through this island’s facilities. Although immigration laws and patterns have changed, the United States continues to lead other nations in the numbers we receive, remaining still, truly a nation of immigrants.

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US #3182i
1998 Immigrants Arrive – Celebrate the Century (1900s)

• Part of the first sheet in the Celebrate the Century stamp series issued from 1998-2000
• Honors the countless immigrants who made their way to America in the 1900s
• Includes text on the back with historical details


Stamp Category:
Commemorative
Series: Celebrate the Century
Value: 32¢ First Class Mail Rate
First Day of Issue: February 3, 1998
First Day City: Washington, DC
Quantity Issued: 188,000,000
Printed by: Ashton Potter (USA) Ltd.
Printing Method: Offset, Intaglio
Format: Panes of 15
Perforations: 11.6
Tagging: Block Tagging

Why the stamp was issued: To commemorate the influx of immigrants in the 1900s and their historical and cultural significance in America.

About the stamp design: Pictures gouache and colored pencil illustration of immigrants by artist Richard Waldrep. Includes the following text on the back “Ellis Island was the nation’s principal immigration station between 1892 and 1954. During the peak decade of 1900-1909, immigrants arrived on an average of 100 an hour.”

First Day City: The First Day of Issue Ceremony was held in Washington, DC, with legendary radio and television host Larry King as master of ceremonies.

About the Celebrate the Century series: The USPS launched the Celebrate the Century series in 1998 to mark the end of the 20th century and herald the arrival of the 21st. The series includes 10 sheets of 15 stamps (150 in total), with each honoring important moments from a different decade (1900s, 10s, 20s, 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s, 70s, 80s, and 90s). At the time of completion, it was the longest and most ambitious commemorative stamp series in US history.

History the stamp represents: The United States has long been known as a nation of immigrants, and indeed, more immigrants have come to this country than to any other. This was especially true from 1901 to 1910, when nearly nine million people came to the United States with the common hope of starting new and better lives. Most of these newcomers entered the country through Ellis island, which was the main reception center for immigrants of the era.

During the period of “new immigration,” which began in the 1890s, people came from Italy, Russia, Poland, Yugoslavia, Germany, and Greece. These immigrants longed to leave behind the poverty and overpopulation of southern and eastern Europe. Willing to work hard and eager to learn, they became some of the most productive Americans of the twentieth century.

Ellis Island, open as an immigration station from 1892 until 1954, has been restored and is now the site of a museum celebrating the immigrant experience. An estimated forty percent of all Americans have ancestors who first came to our country through this island’s facilities. Although immigration laws and patterns have changed, the United States continues to lead other nations in the numbers we receive, remaining still, truly a nation of immigrants.