2005 3c Silver Coffee Pot

# 3759 - 2005 3c Silver Coffee Pot

$0.35 - $3.20
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Image Condition Price Qty
328918
Fleetwood First Day Cover Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 3.20
$ 3.20
0
652240
Colorano Silk First Day Cover Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 2.75
$ 2.75
1
328917
Classic First Day Cover Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days. Free with 500 Points
$ 2.50
$ 2.50
2
328919
Mint Stamp(s) Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 0.35
$ 0.35
3
328920
Mint Coil Pair Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 0.75
$ 0.75
4
328921
Plate Number Coil of 3 Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 1.15
$ 1.15
5
328923
Used Single Stamp(s) Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 0.35
$ 0.35
6
328922
Plate Number Coil of 5 Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 1.95
$ 1.95
7
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U.S. #3759
3¢ Silver Coffeepot Coil
American Design
 
Issue Date: September 16, 2005
City: Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Quantity:
 210,000,000
Printed By: American Packaging Corp. for Sennett Security Products
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations:
9 ¾ Vertically
Color: Multicolored
The sixth stamp in the American Design Series shows a silver coffeepot made about 1786 in Philadelphia. Brewed tea, coffee, and chocolate became enormously popular in the late 17th and the 18th centuries. Wealthy patrons asked silversmiths to craft beautiful pots to serve these beverages.

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U.S. #3759
3¢ Silver Coffeepot Coil
American Design
 
Issue Date: September 16, 2005
City: Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Quantity:
 210,000,000
Printed By: American Packaging Corp. for Sennett Security Products
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations:
9 ¾ Vertically
Color: Multicolored
The sixth stamp in the American Design Series shows a silver coffeepot made about 1786 in Philadelphia. Brewed tea, coffee, and chocolate became enormously popular in the late 17th and the 18th centuries. Wealthy patrons asked silversmiths to craft beautiful pots to serve these beverages.