1875 12c Washington, greenish black

# 44 - 1875 12c Washington, greenish black

$2,300.00 - $3,300.00
Write a Review
Image Condition Price Qty
334284
Mint Stamp(s) Usually ships within 30 days. Usually ships within 30 days.
$ 3,300.00
$ 3,300.00
0
334283
Unused Stamp(s) small flaws Usually ships within 30 days. Usually ships within 30 days.
$ 2,300.00
$ 2,300.00
1
Mounts - Click Here
Mount Price Qty

U.S. #44
1875 George Washington

  • Reprint of #36 of the Series of 1857-61
  • Not valid for postage
  • Issued for the 1876 Centennial International Exposition

Stamp Category:  Definitive

Value:  12cIssue Date: 1875
Printed by:  Continental Bank Note Co.
Quantity printed:  489
Format:  Printed in single sheets of 100
Printing Method:  Engraving                                       
Perforations: 12
Color:  Greenish black 
Paper:  White and hard, without gum

Why the stamp was reprinted:  The Post Office Department requested the stamp in order to have a complete set of all US stamps to showcase at the first world’s fair – the Centennial International Exposition of 1876, held in Philadelphia.  Postal authorities also wanted to be able to fulfill collectors’ and others’ requests for the demonetized issues. 

About the printing:  The design was engraved on a die – a small, flat piece of steel.  The design was copied to a transfer roll – a blank roll of steel.  Several impressions or “reliefs” were made on the roll.  The reliefs were transferred to the plate – a large, flat piece of steel from which the stamps were printed.

 

About the design:  George Washington’s image on the #44 is based on a painting by Gilbert Stuart, who created many portraits of the first president. 

About the 1875 Reprints:  The stamps in this series are reprints of the series of 1857-61.  They were not valid for postage because the original stamps had been demonetized during the Civil War to keep the South from using them.  

Some of the reprints in the series were printed from the original plates (5c, 24c 30c, 90c).  Others (1c, 3c, 10c, 12c) whose plates couldn’t be found, had new plates made from the original transfer rolls.  Stamps with new plates were printed in single sheets of 100; the others were printed in sheets of 200 divided into two panes of 100.

The 1875 reprints can be easily distinguished from the 1857-61 stamps by their brighter colors and their perforation gauge of 12.  The originals were perforated 15½. 

On rare occasions, a used reprint surfaces, despite the fact it was never valid for postage. 

History the stamp represents:  The 12c Washington is a reprint of #36, issued in 1857.  The stamp was displayed at the 1876 Centennial International Exposition, but was not sold there.  It and the other Centennial Exposition issues were available only by special order at the Office of the Third Postmaster General in Washington DC.    

Due to its very low issue quantity, the 12c Washington reprint is so scarce it’s not offered in Mystic’s U.S. Stamp Catalog.   

Read More - Click Here

U.S. #44
1875 George Washington

  • Reprint of #36 of the Series of 1857-61
  • Not valid for postage
  • Issued for the 1876 Centennial International Exposition

Stamp Category:  Definitive

Value:  12cIssue Date: 1875
Printed by:  Continental Bank Note Co.
Quantity printed:  489
Format:  Printed in single sheets of 100
Printing Method:  Engraving                                       
Perforations: 12
Color:  Greenish black 
Paper:  White and hard, without gum

Why the stamp was reprinted:  The Post Office Department requested the stamp in order to have a complete set of all US stamps to showcase at the first world’s fair – the Centennial International Exposition of 1876, held in Philadelphia.  Postal authorities also wanted to be able to fulfill collectors’ and others’ requests for the demonetized issues. 

About the printing:  The design was engraved on a die – a small, flat piece of steel.  The design was copied to a transfer roll – a blank roll of steel.  Several impressions or “reliefs” were made on the roll.  The reliefs were transferred to the plate – a large, flat piece of steel from which the stamps were printed.

 

About the design:  George Washington’s image on the #44 is based on a painting by Gilbert Stuart, who created many portraits of the first president. 

About the 1875 Reprints:  The stamps in this series are reprints of the series of 1857-61.  They were not valid for postage because the original stamps had been demonetized during the Civil War to keep the South from using them.  

Some of the reprints in the series were printed from the original plates (5c, 24c 30c, 90c).  Others (1c, 3c, 10c, 12c) whose plates couldn’t be found, had new plates made from the original transfer rolls.  Stamps with new plates were printed in single sheets of 100; the others were printed in sheets of 200 divided into two panes of 100.

The 1875 reprints can be easily distinguished from the 1857-61 stamps by their brighter colors and their perforation gauge of 12.  The originals were perforated 15½. 

On rare occasions, a used reprint surfaces, despite the fact it was never valid for postage. 

History the stamp represents:  The 12c Washington is a reprint of #36, issued in 1857.  The stamp was displayed at the 1876 Centennial International Exposition, but was not sold there.  It and the other Centennial Exposition issues were available only by special order at the Office of the Third Postmaster General in Washington DC.    

Due to its very low issue quantity, the 12c Washington reprint is so scarce it’s not offered in Mystic’s U.S. Stamp Catalog.