2011 First-Class Forever Stamp,Latin Music Legends

# 4497-4501 - 2011 First-Class Forever Stamp - Latin Music Legends

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U.S. #4497-4501
2011 44¢ Latin Music Legends

Issue Date: March 16, 2011

City: Austin, TX

Printed By: Avery Dennison

Printing Method: Photogravure

Color: Multicolored

 


Passion and vitality mark the music and dance of Latin America that energized America in the 20th century. Latino music and dance was often a blend of Old World European styles with influences introduced by African slaves and travelers. The music soon made its way to the United States and prospered – greatly aided by the skill of legendary artists. Carlos Gardel, Carmen Miranda, Celia Cruz, Tito Puente, and Selena all made an impact upon American culture. 
 
Gardel brought the provocative movements of the tango from Argentina, while Miranda helped introduce the samba from the streets of Brazil. Selena’s expertise in Tejano introduced that style to many Americans, and Celia Cruz was one of the leading salsa singers in the world. Puente was called the “King of the Mambo,” and his talented orchestration helped create a Latin-Jazz merger.
 
These influences were born from backgrounds as diverse as their styles. Experiences ranged from the formally trained Puente sharpening his skills in Spanish Harlem nightclubs, to teenaged Selena perfecting her performance on dusty road tours in Texas. From Cuba with Cruz, Argentina with Gardel, and Brazil with Miranda, these artists all combined to enrich America’s musical tradition.

 

Please note:  Due to the layout of the pane, the se-tenant may or may not be provided in Scott Catalogue order.

 
 

 

Read More - Click Here
U.S. #4497-4501
2011 44¢ Latin Music Legends

Issue Date: March 16, 2011

City: Austin, TX

Printed By: Avery Dennison

Printing Method: Photogravure

Color: Multicolored

 


Passion and vitality mark the music and dance of Latin America that energized America in the 20th century. Latino music and dance was often a blend of Old World European styles with influences introduced by African slaves and travelers. The music soon made its way to the United States and prospered – greatly aided by the skill of legendary artists. Carlos Gardel, Carmen Miranda, Celia Cruz, Tito Puente, and Selena all made an impact upon American culture. 
 
Gardel brought the provocative movements of the tango from Argentina, while Miranda helped introduce the samba from the streets of Brazil. Selena’s expertise in Tejano introduced that style to many Americans, and Celia Cruz was one of the leading salsa singers in the world. Puente was called the “King of the Mambo,” and his talented orchestration helped create a Latin-Jazz merger.
 
These influences were born from backgrounds as diverse as their styles. Experiences ranged from the formally trained Puente sharpening his skills in Spanish Harlem nightclubs, to teenaged Selena perfecting her performance on dusty road tours in Texas. From Cuba with Cruz, Argentina with Gardel, and Brazil with Miranda, these artists all combined to enrich America’s musical tradition.

 

Please note:  Due to the layout of the pane, the se-tenant may or may not be provided in Scott Catalogue order.