2016 First-Class Forever Stamp,National Parks Centennial: Bandelier National Monument

# 5080k - 2016 First-Class Forever Stamp - National Parks Centennial: Bandelier National Monument

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US #5080k
2016 Bandelier National Monument – National Parks

  • Honors Bandelier National Monument
  • One of 16 stamps celebrating the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service


Stamp Category: 
Commemorative
Set:  National Parks
Value:  47¢ First Class Mail Rate (Forever)
First Day of Issue:  June 2, 2016
First Day City:  New York, New York
Quantity Issued:  100,000,000
Printed by:  Banknote Corporation of America
Printing Method:  Offset, Microprint
Format:  Panes of 16
Tagging:  Phosphor tagged paper, block

Why the stamp was issued:  To celebrate the beauty and natural wonders of Bandelier National Monument. 

About the stamp design:  Includes 16 designs, each picturing existing art or photographs of national parks or plants, animals, artwork, objects, or structures in national parks.  The margins of each stamp includes the name of the location. coincide with the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service.

First Day City:  The First Day of Issue Ceremony was held at the Javits Center in New York City as part of the World Stamp Show NY 2016.

About the National Parks set:  Includes 16 stamp designs, each picturing existing art or photographs of national parks or plants, animals, artwork, objects, or structures in national parks.  The margins of each stamp include the name of the location.  Issued to coincide with the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service.  The central image on the sheet of 16 pictures the 1¢ Yosemite postage stamp issued in 1934 along with the text “Our national parks tell distinctly American stories.  Whether they inspire you to marvel at grand vistas, travel along scenic waterways and winding paths, or visit historic buildings and homes, discovery and exploration await.”

History the stamp represents:  The Jemez Mountains region of New Mexico has been part of human existence for more than 10,000 years.  Ancient hunter-gatherers trailed migrating animals over the landscape.  Ancestral Pueblo settlements took root around the mid-12th century.  Spanish settlers followed in the 1800s.

Today, surviving below the Jemez range along canyon walls that climb to towering mesas above, are relics of ancient civilizations.  Carved into the tuff (soft rock of hardened volcanic ash) are vertically arranged dwellings of people from long ago.  This apartment-like housing once made up entire communities, which Spanish explorers referred to as pueblos.

When Swiss-American anthropologist Adolph Bandelier (1840-1914) first visited the Frijoles Canyon pueblos in 1880, he remarked that it was “the grandest thing I ever saw.”  As he traveled to different pueblos, Bandelier learned and recorded the local Native American history, traditions, folklore, and myths.

In the early 1900s, archaeologist Edward Hewett continued where Bandelier had left off.  He also sought to protect the historic ruins of the American Southwest.  Hewett’s persistent efforts directly influenced passage of the Antiquities Act of 1906, and 10 years later, the establishment of Adolph Bandelier’s namesake – the Bandelier National Monument.

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US #5080k
2016 Bandelier National Monument – National Parks

  • Honors Bandelier National Monument
  • One of 16 stamps celebrating the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service


Stamp Category: 
Commemorative
Set:  National Parks
Value:  47¢ First Class Mail Rate (Forever)
First Day of Issue:  June 2, 2016
First Day City:  New York, New York
Quantity Issued:  100,000,000
Printed by:  Banknote Corporation of America
Printing Method:  Offset, Microprint
Format:  Panes of 16
Tagging:  Phosphor tagged paper, block

Why the stamp was issued:  To celebrate the beauty and natural wonders of Bandelier National Monument. 

About the stamp design:  Includes 16 designs, each picturing existing art or photographs of national parks or plants, animals, artwork, objects, or structures in national parks.  The margins of each stamp includes the name of the location. coincide with the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service.

First Day City:  The First Day of Issue Ceremony was held at the Javits Center in New York City as part of the World Stamp Show NY 2016.

About the National Parks set:  Includes 16 stamp designs, each picturing existing art or photographs of national parks or plants, animals, artwork, objects, or structures in national parks.  The margins of each stamp include the name of the location.  Issued to coincide with the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service.  The central image on the sheet of 16 pictures the 1¢ Yosemite postage stamp issued in 1934 along with the text “Our national parks tell distinctly American stories.  Whether they inspire you to marvel at grand vistas, travel along scenic waterways and winding paths, or visit historic buildings and homes, discovery and exploration await.”

History the stamp represents:  The Jemez Mountains region of New Mexico has been part of human existence for more than 10,000 years.  Ancient hunter-gatherers trailed migrating animals over the landscape.  Ancestral Pueblo settlements took root around the mid-12th century.  Spanish settlers followed in the 1800s.

Today, surviving below the Jemez range along canyon walls that climb to towering mesas above, are relics of ancient civilizations.  Carved into the tuff (soft rock of hardened volcanic ash) are vertically arranged dwellings of people from long ago.  This apartment-like housing once made up entire communities, which Spanish explorers referred to as pueblos.

When Swiss-American anthropologist Adolph Bandelier (1840-1914) first visited the Frijoles Canyon pueblos in 1880, he remarked that it was “the grandest thing I ever saw.”  As he traveled to different pueblos, Bandelier learned and recorded the local Native American history, traditions, folklore, and myths.

In the early 1900s, archaeologist Edward Hewett continued where Bandelier had left off.  He also sought to protect the historic ruins of the American Southwest.  Hewett’s persistent efforts directly influenced passage of the Antiquities Act of 1906, and 10 years later, the establishment of Adolph Bandelier’s namesake – the Bandelier National Monument.