2019 70c California Dogface Butterfly

# 5346 - 2019 70c California Dogface Butterfly

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US #5346
2019 California Dogface Butterfly – Non-Machinable Butterfly Series

• The 7th stamp in the Non-Machinable Butterfly series
• Pictures the elusive California Dogface Butterfly

Stamp Category:  Definitive
Series:  Non-Machinable Butterfly
Value:  70¢ Non-Machinable Surcharge Rate
First Day of Issue:  January 27, 2019
First Day City:  Kansas City, Missouri
Quantity Issued:  100,000,000
Printed by:  Banknote Corporation of America
Printing Method:  Offset, Microprint
Format:  Panes of 20
Tagging:  Phosphor, Block Tagged

Why the stamp was issued:  To cover the non-machinable surcharge rate and continue the Non-Machinabe Butterfly stamp series.

About the stamp design:  Pictures a digital illustration of a California dogface butterfly. Images of preserved butterflies were used as references. Original artwork by Tom Engeman.

First Day City:  The First Day of Issue postmark was from Kansas City, Missouri, the headquarters of Stamp Cancellation Services.

About the Non-Machinable Butterfly series:  The Non-Machinable Butterfly stamp series began on May 17, 2010, with the issue of the 64¢ Monarch Butterfly design. The series was created to be used on greeting cards or other envelopes that required additional postage and/or could not be sorted on the USPS’s automated equipment (known as “non-machinable”). This may include oddly-shaped, vertical, lumpy, or rigid envelopes. Even if an envelope weighs less than one ounce but is unmachinable, it would need a non-machinable surcharge rate stamp.

The USPS worked closely with the greeting card industry on the new Butterfly series. Reflecting this close working relationship, the 64¢ Monarch Butterfly stamp was issued at the National Stationery Show in New York City. The first stamp remained in use for two years before being replaced by the Baltimore Checkerspot Butterfly design in 2012 when the non-machinable rate increased to 65¢. New stamps followed every year through 2016, with the 2015 and 2016 being the first two without the actual denominations printed on the stamps.

The California Dogface Butterfly stamp was announced in 2016 and was expected to be issued in 2017. However, the USPS held off on printing the new design until supplies of existing butterfly stamps were nearly depleted. The California Dogface Butterfly stamp was finally issued in 2019.

History the stamp represents:  While many other butterfly species can be found across North America, the California dogface butterfly’s range is limited to Central and Southern California. This led California to adopt the dogface butterfly as its official state insect in 1972.

Commonly located in wooded areas of the Santa Ana Mountains, the California dogface is picky about its habitat. Adult butterflies feed mainly on nectar from purple flowers, like thistles. Eggs are laid only on false indigo plants, with caterpillars feeding on the vegetation until they pupate.

Male dogface butterflies’ wings are yellow-orange with black sections on the upper pair (forewings) – a design that resembles a dog’s face. This earned the species its strange name. Females, on the other hand, are completely yellow with a single dark spot on each forewing.

The California dogface butterfly’s unique wing pattern makes it a sought-after species by many nature photographers. However, the California dogface flies exceptionally fast, making it difficult to spot one with its wings open long enough to take a photo. These butterflies only remain still while they are drinking nectar – making them a rare and beautiful sight.

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US #5346
2019 California Dogface Butterfly – Non-Machinable Butterfly Series

• The 7th stamp in the Non-Machinable Butterfly series
• Pictures the elusive California Dogface Butterfly

Stamp Category:  Definitive
Series:  Non-Machinable Butterfly
Value:  70¢ Non-Machinable Surcharge Rate
First Day of Issue:  January 27, 2019
First Day City:  Kansas City, Missouri
Quantity Issued:  100,000,000
Printed by:  Banknote Corporation of America
Printing Method:  Offset, Microprint
Format:  Panes of 20
Tagging:  Phosphor, Block Tagged

Why the stamp was issued:  To cover the non-machinable surcharge rate and continue the Non-Machinabe Butterfly stamp series.

About the stamp design:  Pictures a digital illustration of a California dogface butterfly. Images of preserved butterflies were used as references. Original artwork by Tom Engeman.

First Day City:  The First Day of Issue postmark was from Kansas City, Missouri, the headquarters of Stamp Cancellation Services.

About the Non-Machinable Butterfly series:  The Non-Machinable Butterfly stamp series began on May 17, 2010, with the issue of the 64¢ Monarch Butterfly design. The series was created to be used on greeting cards or other envelopes that required additional postage and/or could not be sorted on the USPS’s automated equipment (known as “non-machinable”). This may include oddly-shaped, vertical, lumpy, or rigid envelopes. Even if an envelope weighs less than one ounce but is unmachinable, it would need a non-machinable surcharge rate stamp.

The USPS worked closely with the greeting card industry on the new Butterfly series. Reflecting this close working relationship, the 64¢ Monarch Butterfly stamp was issued at the National Stationery Show in New York City. The first stamp remained in use for two years before being replaced by the Baltimore Checkerspot Butterfly design in 2012 when the non-machinable rate increased to 65¢. New stamps followed every year through 2016, with the 2015 and 2016 being the first two without the actual denominations printed on the stamps.

The California Dogface Butterfly stamp was announced in 2016 and was expected to be issued in 2017. However, the USPS held off on printing the new design until supplies of existing butterfly stamps were nearly depleted. The California Dogface Butterfly stamp was finally issued in 2019.

History the stamp represents:  While many other butterfly species can be found across North America, the California dogface butterfly’s range is limited to Central and Southern California. This led California to adopt the dogface butterfly as its official state insect in 1972.

Commonly located in wooded areas of the Santa Ana Mountains, the California dogface is picky about its habitat. Adult butterflies feed mainly on nectar from purple flowers, like thistles. Eggs are laid only on false indigo plants, with caterpillars feeding on the vegetation until they pupate.

Male dogface butterflies’ wings are yellow-orange with black sections on the upper pair (forewings) – a design that resembles a dog’s face. This earned the species its strange name. Females, on the other hand, are completely yellow with a single dark spot on each forewing.

The California dogface butterfly’s unique wing pattern makes it a sought-after species by many nature photographers. However, the California dogface flies exceptionally fast, making it difficult to spot one with its wings open long enough to take a photo. These butterflies only remain still while they are drinking nectar – making them a rare and beautiful sight.